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Leviticus 20; The Wages of Sin and the Gift of God

01/29 Leviticus 20; The Wages of Sin and the Gift of God; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20170129_leviticus-20.mp3

After a bit of a break, we are going to jump back in to the book of Leviticus. We are in chapter 20. Before we jump right in, we need to locate ourselves in the book to understand what we are looking at in its context.

We are in the second major half of Leviticus. Leviticus 16 is the centerpiece of Leviticus; and the book of Leviticus is the centerpiece of the Torah or Pentateuch; the five books of Moses.

Leviticus 1-7 outline the sacrificial system; Leviticus 8-10 describe the priests, those responsible for officiating the sacrifices; chapters 11-15 describe various sources of uncleanness that require sacrifice; and chapter 16 explains the great Day of Atonement; how uncleanness is cleansed so God can dwell with man. To use a New Testament theological term, Leviticus 16 deals with justification. We are told:

Leviticus 16:30 For on this day shall atonement be made for you to cleanse you. You shall be clean before the LORD from all your sins.

No work was to be done by the people on that day; rather work was done for the people by the priest. The people were to be completely cleansed by the work of their high priest.

Leviticus 17-27 is known as the holiness code; how does a person live after being made right with God through the work of the high priest? In New Testament terms, we would use the word sanctification. Now that I have been justified, now that I have been reconciled to God through the sacrifice of a substitute, what does life in relationship with a holy God look like?

The basis of these demands for holiness are rooted in our relationship with the LORD. God says in chapters 18-20 almost 50 times “I am the LORD your God.” The foundation for these regulations is relationship. Because I am your God and I have taken you to be my people, this is how you must live.

Leviticus 19 is one of Jesus’ favorite chapters in the Bible. In 19:2 we find the oft repeated phrase “you shall be holy, for I the LORD your God am holy”; which forms the basis of Jesus’ teaching in Matthew 5:48 that “you …must be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect.” Leviticus 19 spells out in very diverse real life ways what holiness looks like in daily life and relationships. 19:18 is what Jesus quotes when he says “you shall love your neighbor as yourself”(Mt.5:43; 19:19; 22:39); then in 19:34 this is expanded to include the stranger who sojourns with you; “you shall love him as yourself”; this is the basis for Jesus’ teaching in Matthew 5 on loving you enemy, and the foundation of his teaching in Luke 10 on the good Samaritan and who was a neighbor to the man in need.

Chapter 19 is sandwiched between chapters 18 and 20. These two chapters cover much of the same ground, and if you remember back, chapter 18 was one of the most uncomfortable messages I have ever had to give. It deals with holiness and human sexuality, because holiness extends to every area of life.

We could ask, ‘Why so much repetition? Why cover the same ground twice?’ One reason is that this is important and we are often slow to hear. This information matters to God enough for him to say it twice. If God recorded it for us twice in the space of three chapters, we ought to take notice and heed his instruction. Another reason is that chapters 18 and 20 are coming at the same subject from two different angles. Chapter 18 is addressed to the individual Israelite, telling him ‘do not do these things; they are highly displeasing to the LORD who bought you.’ The goal is found in 18:4-5

Leviticus 18:4 You shall follow my rules and keep my statutes and walk in them. I am the LORD your God. 5 You shall therefore keep my statutes and my rules; if a person does them, he shall live by them: I am the LORD.

Do these things and you will enjoy life in relationship with me. Life and obedience are linked together.

Chapter 20 is not addressed to the individual but to the holy community. If someone who is living as part of the community does any of these forbidden things and sins against the LORD, this is how the community is to respond. Nine times we find the phrase ‘shall surely be put to death’; 6 times ‘their blood is upon them’; 5 times ‘cut off from among their people’; 3 times ‘I will set my face against that man’; 3 times ‘shall bear their iniquity’ or ‘sin’; 2 times ‘shall be childless’; 2 times shall stone him with stones’; once ‘shall be burned with fire’. Chapter 18 holds out life in following God’s rules; chapter 20 commands death and separation as the consequence of refusing to follow God’s ways. The wages of sin is death.

Structure

This passage has three main sections of judgment pronounced on disobedience, separated by two sections of exhortation to holy living.

20:1-6 sins against God [spiritual unfaithfulness]

–20:7-8 exhortation to holiness

—-20:9-21 sins against family [protecting human relationships]

–20:22-26 exhortation to holiness [promise of holiness]

20:27 sins against God [spiritual unfaithfulness]

We see in this passage a connection between spiritual unfaithfulness and sexual degeneracy; the same connection we see in Romans 1.

Consequences for Spiritual Unfaithfulness

Leviticus 20:1 The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “Say to the people of Israel, Any one of the people of Israel or of the strangers who sojourn in Israel who gives any of his children to Molech shall surely be put to death. The people of the land shall stone him with stones. 3 I myself will set my face against that man and will cut him off from among his people, because he has given one of his children to Molech, to make my sanctuary unclean and to profane my holy name. 4 And if the people of the land do at all close their eyes to that man when he gives one of his children to Molech, and do not put him to death, 5 then I will set my face against that man and against his clan and will cut them off from among their people, him and all who follow him in whoring after Molech. 6 “If a person turns to mediums and necromancers, whoring after them, I will set my face against that person and will cut him off from among his people.

This issue was briefly mentioned in Leviticus 18:21

Leviticus 18:21 You shall not give any of your children to offer them to Molech, and so profane the name of your God: I am the LORD.

Offering children to Molech was one of the reasons God told his people to exterminate entire civilizations. All the way back in Genesis, God told Abram that his descendants

Genesis 15:16 And they shall come back here in the fourth generation, for the iniquity of the Amorites is not yet complete.”

Now that time has come; the Lord detests their practices and the land will vomit out its inhabitants. One of these detestable practices was child sacrifice.

David’s son, king Solomon, married many foreign women who turned away his heart after other gods. We are told in 1 Kings 11

1 Kings 11:7 Then Solomon built a high place for Chemosh the abomination of Moab, and for Molech the abomination of the Ammonites, on the mountain east of Jerusalem.

Jeremiah prophesies against Judah, because

Jeremiah 7:31 And they have built the high places of Topheth, which is in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, to burn their sons and their daughters in the fire, which I did not command, nor did it come into my mind.

Jeremiah says

Jeremiah 19:4 Because the people have forsaken me and have profaned this place by making offerings in it to other gods whom neither they nor their fathers nor the kings of Judah have known; and because they have filled this place with the blood of innocents, 5 and have built the high places of Baal to burn their sons in the fire as burnt offerings to Baal, which I did not command or decree, nor did it come into my mind—

Jeremiah says they have filled Topheth, the Valley of Hinnom with the blood of the innocents, and he calls these offerings ‘whole bunrt offerings’. He says in chapter 32

Jeremiah 32:35 They built the high places of Baal in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, to offer up their sons and daughters to Molech, though I did not command them, nor did it enter into my mind, that they should do this abomination, to cause Judah to sin.

In Ezekiel 16, God accuses Jerusalem of being an unfaithful bride.

Ezekiel 16:20 And you took your sons and your daughters, whom you had borne to me, and these you sacrificed to them to be devoured. Were your whorings so small a matter 21 that you slaughtered my children and delivered them up as an offering by fire to them?

When we visited Gezer, a once important Canaanite city on a major trade intersection west of Jerusalem, we looked at an excavation report that listed the skeleton of a child, and a number of jar buried infants, probably less than a week old, some of which had been burned.

God insisted that anyone in the land found guilty of offering a child to a false god must be stoned to death by the community. Even if the people chose to look the other way, or ‘closed their eyes to that man,’ God himself would enact the punishment. God took this personally. He says three times ‘I myself will set my face against that man and will cut him off from among his people’ (v.3, 5, 6). He calls this ‘whoring after’, likening idolatry to marital unfaithfulness.

In the United States, the number of legal abortions performed since the 1973 decision Roe vs. Wade is approaching 60 million children.

There were an estimated 906,000 legal abortions in 2015 in the U.S. The State of Florida records reason for each abortion; of the over 71 thousand abortions in florida in 2015, less than 1% of abortions were reported to terminate a pregnancy related to incestuous relationships, rape, endagering the life of the mother, or a threat to physical or psychological health of mother; a little over half a percent was due to a serious fetal abnormality; about 6 and a quarter percent was for social or economic reasons; over 92% the procedures were elective; there was no reason. We have filled our land with the blood of the innocents.

The wages of sin is death. This passage begins and ends with spiritual unfaithfulness. We are not to turn to those who deal with spirits or deal with the deceased. God alone is the source of all truth.

Leviticus 20:27 “A man or a woman who is a medium or a necromancer shall surely be put to death. They shall be stoned with stones; their blood shall be upon them.”

Exhortation to Holiness and the Source of Holiness

Leviticus 20:7 Consecrate yourselves, therefore, and be holy, for I am the LORD your God. 8 Keep my statutes and do them; I am the LORD who sanctifies you.

The ground for the commands is our relationship with God. Set yourselves apart and be set apart, for I am the LORD your God. Keep and do my commands; I am the LORD who sets you apart. We are to be holy, be set apart because the LORD is our God. We are to be holy because the LORD makes us holy. We cannot be holy on our own, of our own initiative. We do take initiative. We set ourselves apart, we choose to live lives of holiness; but we can only do so because God sets us apart; God sanctifies us. Be holy because I am the LORD who makes you holy.

Consequences for Sins against the Family

The next section is intended to protect the family. It begins by requiring children to respect the God-given authority of father and mother, and continues by forbidding sexual deviancy.

Leviticus 20:9 For anyone who curses his father or his mother shall surely be put to death; he has cursed his father or his mother; his blood is upon him. 10 “If a man commits adultery with the wife of his neighbor, both the adulterer and the adulteress shall surely be put to death. 11 If a man lies with his father’s wife, he has uncovered his father’s nakedness; both of them shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon them. 12 If a man lies with his daughter-in-law, both of them shall surely be put to death; they have committed perversion; their blood is upon them. 13 If a man lies with a male as with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination; they shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon them. 14 If a man takes a woman and her mother also, it is depravity; he and they shall be burned with fire, that there may be no depravity among you. 15 If a man lies with an animal, he shall surely be put to death, and you shall kill the animal. 16 If a woman approaches any animal and lies with it, you shall kill the woman and the animal; they shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon them. 17 “If a man takes his sister, a daughter of his father or a daughter of his mother, and sees her nakedness, and she sees his nakedness, it is a disgrace, and they shall be cut off in the sight of the children of their people. He has uncovered his sister’s nakedness, and he shall bear his iniquity. 18 If a man lies with a woman during her menstrual period and uncovers her nakedness, he has made naked her fountain, and she has uncovered the fountain of her blood. Both of them shall be cut off from among their people. 19 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your mother’s sister or of your father’s sister, for that is to make naked one’s relative; they shall bear their iniquity. 20 If a man lies with his uncle’s wife, he has uncovered his uncle’s nakedness; they shall bear their sin; they shall die childless. 21 If a man takes his brother’s wife, it is impurity. He has uncovered his brother’s nakedness; they shall be childless.

The family unit is to be preserved. Adultery, incest, homosexuality, polygamy, bestiality are forbidden. They are called perversion, an abomination, depravity, a disgrace, impurity. These are strong words. God created us for a good purpose, to leave father and mother and cleave to one wife, and become one flesh. Romans 1 traces a similar spiritual decline that moves from idolatry to sexual distortions. Suppressing truth about God and failure to honor him as God leads to foolish idolatry and then to the pursuit of dishonorable passions. Paul concludes “…they know God’s decree that those who practice such things deserve to die…” (Rom.1:32).

Exhortation to Holiness and Promise of Holiness

Leviticus 20:22 “You shall therefore keep all my statutes and all my rules and do them, that the land where I am bringing you to live may not vomit you out. 23 And you shall not walk in the customs of the nation that I am driving out before you, for they did all these things, and therefore I detested them. 24 But I have said to you, ‘You shall inherit their land, and I will give it to you to possess, a land flowing with milk and honey.’ I am the LORD your God, who has separated you from the peoples. 25 You shall therefore separate the clean beast from the unclean, and the unclean bird from the clean. You shall not make yourselves detestable by beast or by bird or by anything with which the ground crawls, which I have set apart for you to hold unclean. 26 You shall be holy to me, for I the LORD am holy and have separated you from the peoples, that you should be mine.

This passage is a warning. The nations I am driving out did all these things, and therefore I detested them. Do not do as they did, or the land will vomit you out as well. God is just. The wages of sin is death. Israel failed to heed God’s warning, and although he is patient, he is just, and the land vomited them out; they went into captivity.

God says you shall therefore keep all my statues and all my rules and do them. …You shall inherit their land, and I will give it to you to possess. …I am the LORD your God who has separated you from the peoples. …You shall be holy to me …for I have separated you from the peoples that you should be mine. These are precious promises, and they are freely given. They are not earned. We do not become holy by our own efforts. God is the one who calls us out us from among the peoples, who freely gives us an inheritance, who sets us apart as holy to him, that we should belong to him. God is the one, according to Ezekiel 36 who says:

Ezekiel 36:27 And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules.

There is a spiritual decline in Romans 1 that moves from failure to worship God as he is, to idolatry, to dishonorable passions. But this is why Paul is not ashamed of the gospel:

Romans 1:16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation…

To who?

…to everyone who believes…

Paul is not ashamed of the gospel for it is the power of God for salvation. To you, if you will believe.

Romans 6:23 For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

What we earned is death. We all have sinned and fallen short. But in Jesus God offers us a free gift. He offers the powerful gift of life to all who will believe. It is a free gift to be received by faith. By believing. This is a powerful transforming gift. This is a gift that changes you.

2 Corinthians 5:17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

Have you believed? Have you experienced the desire-transforming power of God’s Spirit in you, as he calls you ‘mine’ and begins to make you holy?

***

We have a message of good news. For those who have had an abortion, we have good news of healing and forgiveness in Jesus. For those considering aborting, we have a message of hope in Jesus. There is another way, the way of life. For the sexually immoral, for the sexually deviant, for idolaters who worship their own desires above the Lord God, there is hope. Let’s bring the good news that a holy God freely gives his Spirit to the broken, to the hurting, to transform them by his magnificent grace!

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

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January 30, 2017 Posted by | Leviticus | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leviticus 18; The Gospel and Human Sexuality

10/23 Leviticus 18; The Gospel and Human Sexuality; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20161023_leviticus-18.mp3

We are in Leviticus 18, and to understand what we are studying, we need to understand where we are in the book of Leviticus.

Leviticus 1-7 Sacrifices

Leviticus 8-10 Priests

Leviticus 11-15 Uncleanness

Leviticus 16 Day of Atonement

Leviticus 17-27 Holy Living

The first half of Leviticus gives the sacrificial system, dealing with uncleanness and how to be cleansed from uncleanness. Leviticus 16 brings us to the great Day of Atonement, where we are told:

Leviticus 16:30 For on this day shall atonement be made for you to cleanse you. You shall be clean before the LORD from all your sins.

No work was to be done by the people on that day; rather work was done for the people by the priest. The people were to be completely cleansed by the work of their high priest.

The remainder of the book deals with the conduct expected of God’s redeemed, cleansed, and forgiven people. What does life in relationship with the holy God look like? Having been decisively forgiven, how do we now live to please him? Notice carefully the sequence. We are forgiven and cleansed so that we can live lives that please the Lord. We must not reverse this order. We cannot attempt to please God with our conduct in order to be forgiven and accepted by him. God’s grace and forgiveness always comes first. The power to live a transformed life comes from being already forgiven by a merciful God.

The Reason for The Rules

Leviticus 18:1 And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “Speak to the people of Israel and say to them, I am the LORD your God. 3 You shall not do as they do in the land of Egypt, where you lived, and you shall not do as they do in the land of Canaan, to which I am bringing you. You shall not walk in their statutes. 4 You shall follow my rules and keep my statutes and walk in them. I am the LORD your God. 5 You shall therefore keep my statutes and my rules; if a person does them, he shall live by them: I am the LORD.

Notice, this is based on relationship. God says in chapters 18-20 almost 50 times “I am the LORD your God.” The foundation for these regulations is relationship. Because I am your God and you are my people, this is how you must live. I am the LORD your God, who saved you out of the land of Egypt. I am the LORD your God, who is giving you the promised land of Canaan. Therefore, because you are already my people, because we are in relationship, this is how I expect you to conduct yourselves. Because you are my people, your lives must be different from the cultures around you. This is linked to the previous chapter. Other people follow false gods. Other people live with a different world view. Don’t live like those who follow other gods. If I am your God, then you must follow my rules.

There is a promise here of life for obedience. We are tempted to see God’s rules as restrictive, stifling, oppressive, limiting. Rather, God designed his rules to be life giving, protecting, liberating, the path to lasting joy. Obedience to God’s rules leads to life. Abundant life. Disregard of God’s rules leads to pain and heartache, hurt and ultimately death. God gave us rules for our own good, for our happiness, to bless us.

Human Sexuality; Incest

Leviticus 18 is about human sexuality. Our sexuality matters to God. How we live, how we conduct ourselves matters to God. God is not silent on matters of sex. God does not leave us in the dark wondering, trying to find our own way. Graciously, God communicates clearly and openly to us.

Leviticus 18:6 “None of you shall approach any one of his close relatives to uncover nakedness. I am the LORD. 7 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your father, which is the nakedness of your mother; she is your mother, you shall not uncover her nakedness. 8 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your father’s wife; it is your father’s nakedness. 9 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your sister, your father’s daughter or your mother’s daughter, whether brought up in the family or in another home. 10 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your son’s daughter or of your daughter’s daughter, for their nakedness is your own nakedness. 11 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your father’s wife’s daughter, brought up in your father’s family, since she is your sister. 12 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your father’s sister; she is your father’s relative. 13 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your mother’s sister, for she is your mother’s relative. 14 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your father’s brother, that is, you shall not approach his wife; she is your aunt. 15 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your daughter-in-law; she is your son’s wife, you shall not uncover her nakedness. 16 You shall not uncover the nakedness of your brother’s wife; it is your brother’s nakedness. 17 You shall not uncover the nakedness of a woman and of her daughter, and you shall not take her son’s daughter or her daughter’s daughter to uncover her nakedness; they are relatives; it is depravity. 18 And you shall not take a woman as a rival wife to her sister, uncovering her nakedness while her sister is still alive.

Some things ought to go without saying. But praise God, he said them, because our hearts are “deceitful above all things, and desperately sick” (Jer.17:9). We need clear boundaries. Our country today is clear evidence that it needs to be said, or anything and everything will be up for grabs. We see this danger addressed in the church in Corinth.

1 Corinthians 5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife.

We see here clearly God’s heart of protection for his people. This section deals in detail with incest. These laws are fences, boundaries to protect his people, to protect those who may be weaker from being victimized. This protection extends to mother, sister, granddaughter, and aunt. Many of these relationships in the culture of the middle east would be found living in the same household in an extended family. These laws were necessary for Israel particularly, because the Israelites were forbidden to marry foreigners, and because the land was to be kept within a tribe marriages were typically within the tribe. These laws would prevent marriages with close relatives that would tend toward defects common to inbreeding.

One Flesh

But this was not the only reason. Inappropriate relationships extend even to in-laws, those related not by blood but by marriage. This included step-mother, step-sister, step-daughter, step-granddaughter, daughter-in-law, sister-in-law and aunt by marriage. In this chapter we find a great honoring of the marriage relationship. Jesus said:

Matthew 19:4 He answered, “Have you not read that he who created them from the beginning made them male and female, 5 and said, ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’?6 So they are no longer two but one flesh. What therefore God has joined together, let not man separate.”

The one flesh marriage relationship means that to uncover the nakedness of a woman is to uncover the nakedness of her husband, and to dishonor her husband, because the two are one flesh. The marriage relationship is to be honored.

Pornography and Petting

I find it interesting that the phrase this passage uses for the sexual relationship is ‘to uncover the nakedness of.’ This is clearly a euphemism, but I think we can glean some insight from it into our digital age. I’m talking about pornography. Many attempt to justify their sin by saying ‘I’m not hurting anyone. I’m just looking. After all, they are the ones who put the pictures out there.’ This passage says ‘you shall not uncover the nakedness of.’ Although this passage doesn’t directly deal with this issue, Jesus does. He says:

Matthew 5:27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell.

And I think we also get clear help on the question ‘how far is too far?’ ‘We didn’t actually go all the way.’ But ‘you shall not uncover the nakedness of…’ to have any kind of sexual encounter with anyone who is not your spouse, is not appropriate for the follower of Jesus.

Protection of Women

There is protection here for women. To have relationships with a woman and her daughter or granddaughter or sister would be damaging to that natural relationship. The language of verse 18 forbids the polygamous situation of taking a rival wife while her sister is still alive. We see the damaging results of this kind of rivalry in the story of Jacob with Leah and Rachel in the last half of Genesis.

Leviticus 18:19 “You shall not approach a woman to uncover her nakedness while she is in her menstrual uncleanness.

There is protection of a woman here even from her own husband at inappropriate times.

Leviticus 18:20 And you shall not lie sexually with your neighbor’s wife and so make yourself unclean with her.

This is a restatement of the seventh commandment “you shall not commit adultery” (Ex.20:14). This whole chapter is a working out in detail the implications of this command, along with the 5th command to honor father and mother, and the 10th to not covet your neighbor’s wife.

Leviticus 18:21 You shall not give any of your children to offer them to Molech, and so profane the name of your God: I am the LORD.

This command is expanded in chapter 20, so we will deal with it in more detail there.

Leviticus 18:22 You shall not lie with a male as with a woman; it is an abomination. 23 And you shall not lie with any animal and so make yourself unclean with it, neither shall any woman give herself to an animal to lie with it: it is perversion.

Homosexuality and bestiality are condemned here. ‘Abomination’ speaks of something utterly repulsive. ‘Perversion’ speaks of something that violates the created order of things. This is a violation of God’s order in creation. Jesus points us back to God’s design for marriage.

Matthew 19:4 …he who created them from the beginning made them male and female,

And the entire New Testament reinforces this teaching that marriage is to be between one man and one woman for life.

Leviticus 18:24 “Do not make yourselves unclean by any of these things, for by all these the nations I am driving out before you have become unclean, 25 and the land became unclean, so that I punished its iniquity, and the land vomited out its inhabitants. 26 But you shall keep my statutes and my rules and do none of these abominations, either the native or the stranger who sojourns among you 27 (for the people of the land, who were before you, did all of these abominations, so that the land became unclean), 28 lest the land vomit you out when you make it unclean, as it vomited out the nation that was before you. 29 For everyone who does any of these abominations, the persons who do them shall be cut off from among their people. 30 So keep my charge never to practice any of these abominable customs that were practiced before you, and never to make yourselves unclean by them: I am the LORD your God.”

Incest is an abomination, polygamy is an abomination, adultery is an abomination, idolatry is an abomination, homosexuality is an abomination, bestiality is an abomination, pornography, lust of any kind is an abomination. These are not laws merely for Israel; Egypt and Canaan knew better and were being judged for their violation of this universal morality. Centuries earlier, God had said to Abraham,

Genesis 15:16 And they shall come back here in the fourth generation, for the iniquity of the Amorites is not yet complete.”

God is incredibly patient. But he will punish sin. And we learn from the later prophets that Israel did not listen, and violated these laws, and the land did indeed ‘vomit them out;’ they were conquered by foreign nations and went into captivity.

Application

I have said as we have been going through Leviticus that we are not looking for laws to obey, we are looking for glimpses of Jesus. And in this passage we get a glimpse of the heart of Jesus, the heart of Jesus to protect people, to care for women and children, widows and orphans. To protect people from relational suicide and self-destructive behavior. To protect his people from destructive temptation that will destroy life and steal joy. We get a glimpse of the heart of Jesus, who offers us life and life abundantly, if we will follow him.

1 Corinthians 6:18 Flee from sexual immorality. Every other sin a person commits is outside the body, but the sexually immoral person sins against his own body. 19 Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, 20 for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.

We were meant for more than sexual immorality. Our bodies were created for a high purpose, to be a dwelling place for the Most High God, to bring glory and honor to him.

We get a glimpse of the heart of Jesus that is repulsed by the lukewarm church of Revelation 3. He says

Revelation 3:15 “‘I know your works: you are neither cold nor hot. Would that you were either cold or hot! 16 So, because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spit you out of my mouth. 17 For you say, I am rich, I have prospered, and I need nothing, not realizing that you are wretched, pitiable, poor, blind, and naked.

Jesus says ‘I am about to vomit you out;’ Jesus has a violent emotional reaction against those that are complacent about him. You might be offended by Jesus, or you might become a passionate follower of Jesus, but to just be ho-hum is not an option. To just be a casual cultural Christian without a real vital relationship with Jesus is violently repulsive to Jesus. Better to be a Saul of Tarsus, vehemently persecuting and imprisoning followers of Jesus, than to be a Pilate, who comes face to face with Jesus and shrugs his shoulders and says ‘what is truth?’

And we get a glimpse of the transformational power of the gospel of our Lord Jesus. Jesus “came not to call the righteous but sinners to repentance” (Lk.5:2). About the woman of the street who had a reputation known to all, Jesus said:

Luke 7:47 …her sins, which are many, are forgiven—for she loved much. But he who is forgiven little, loves little.”

To the woman caught in the very act of adultery and dragged out to be judged by Jesus, he said:

John 8:11 …And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.”

1 Corinthians 6 says:

1 Corinthians 6:9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

This is quite the laundry list of sins that are abominable, detestable, abhorrent to a holy God. But not one of these sinners is beyond hope! Not one of these sinners is too fare gone for the grace of God. Not one is beyond the reach of the transforming power good news that Jesus came to rescue sinners! Jesus came to die for sinners. Not one of these sins defines you. And such were some of you! But you were washed! You were sanctified! You were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God! What you were you are no longer. You can be clean! There is hope in Jesus for the sexually immoral, for the adulterer, for the homosexual, for the thief, for the drunk, for the selfish. Jesus’ love reaches out to such as these. Jesus came for these. Jesus came to give us a new identity! Jesus came to set us free!

2 Corinthians 5:17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

October 24, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leviticus 15; Bodily Discharges

09/18 Leviticus 15; Bodily Discharges; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20160918_leviticus-15.mp3

We are in Leviticus 15, a passage I’ve been looking forward to preaching on for some time now. If you’re new, we believe that all scripture is breathed out by God and profitable, so our normal practice here is to pick a book of the Bible and study our way through it, listening for what God has to say to us. Some of our regulars who know this read ahead in the text, and some of them saw what was coming and decided this would be a good week to be out of town. Others of you who read ahead are here out of a morbid sense of curiosity to see what in the world we are going to do with this chapter. The rest of you who don’t read ahead have no idea what you are in for today! Sometimes the worship team asks me what I am going to be preaching on, so they can pick a song that ties in with the main idea of the message. Leviticus 15 is about unclean bodily discharges from the male and female reproductive organs, so I am eager to hear what song they choose to close our service with today, if we make it that far.

~pray~

Before we read through the passage this morning, I want to put in front of you an outline of the chapter, that I believe will help us make sense of it. The Bible is a brilliant literary masterpiece, and there is structure in the text that we often miss if we do not take the time to look carefully. Just reading through the text we might get lost in the gross details and miss the beautiful symmetry of the passage.

Outline:

A. introduction (1-2)

B. abnormal male discharges (2-15)

C. normal male discharges (16-17)

D. male/female intimacy (18)

‘C. normal female discharges (19-24)

‘B. abnormal female discharges (25-30)

‘A. conclusion (31-33)

This chapter is what is called a chiastic or X shaped structure where two halves of the passage mirror one another to demonstrate the fundamental unity in a double sided event or phenomena. This chapter is about human sexuality and it moves from abnormal to normal and climaxes (!) in the intimacy between male and female. The very structure of this passage reminds us of Genesis 1, where

Genesis 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. 28 And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it…

Keep in mind, as we read this chapter, that God created man as male and female, each uniquely and purposefully designed for intimacy within the marriage relationship, and that everything God created was good, and this specifically was ‘very good.’ Also keep in mind that we rebelled against God’s good authority and brought sin and death and disease and brokenness into God’s good creation.

A. introduction:

Leviticus 15:1 The LORD spoke to Moses and Aaron, saying, 2 “Speak to the people of Israel and say to them,

B. abnormal male discharges:

When any man has a discharge from his body, his discharge is unclean. 3 And this is the law of his uncleanness for a discharge: whether his body runs with his discharge, or his body is blocked up by his discharge, it is his uncleanness. 4 Every bed on which the one with the discharge lies shall be unclean, and everything on which he sits shall be unclean. 5 And anyone who touches his bed shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 6 And whoever sits on anything on which the one with the discharge has sat shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 7 And whoever touches the body of the one with the discharge shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 8 And if the one with the discharge spits on someone who is clean, then he shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 9 And any saddle on which the one with the discharge rides shall be unclean. 10 And whoever touches anything that was under him shall be unclean until the evening. And whoever carries such things shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 11 Anyone whom the one with the discharge touches without having rinsed his hands in water shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 12 And an earthenware vessel that the one with the discharge touches shall be broken, and every vessel of wood shall be rinsed in water. 13 “And when the one with a discharge is cleansed of his discharge, then he shall count for himself seven days for his cleansing, and wash his clothes. And he shall bathe his body in fresh water and shall be clean. 14 And on the eighth day he shall take two turtledoves or two pigeons and come before the LORD to the entrance of the tent of meeting and give them to the priest. 15 And the priest shall use them, one for a sin offering and the other for a burnt offering. And the priest shall make atonement for him before the LORD for his discharge.

C. normal male discharges

16 “If a man has an emission of semen, he shall bathe his whole body in water and be unclean until the evening. 17 And every garment and every skin on which the semen comes shall be washed with water and be unclean until the evening.

D. male/female intimacy:

18 If a man lies with a woman and has an emission of semen, both of them shall bathe themselves in water and be unclean until the evening.

‘C. normal female discharges:

19 “When a woman has a discharge, and the discharge in her body is blood, she shall be in her menstrual impurity for seven days, and whoever touches her shall be unclean until the evening. 20 And everything on which she lies during her menstrual impurity shall be unclean. Everything also on which she sits shall be unclean. 21 And whoever touches her bed shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 22 And whoever touches anything on which she sits shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 23 Whether it is the bed or anything on which she sits, when he touches it he shall be unclean until the evening. 24 And if any man lies with her and her menstrual impurity comes upon him, he shall be unclean seven days, and every bed on which he lies shall be unclean.

‘B. abnormal female discharges:

25 “If a woman has a discharge of blood for many days, not at the time of her menstrual impurity, or if she has a discharge beyond the time of her impurity, all the days of the discharge she shall continue in uncleanness. As in the days of her impurity, she shall be unclean. 26 Every bed on which she lies, all the days of her discharge, shall be to her as the bed of her impurity. And everything on which she sits shall be unclean, as in the uncleanness of her menstrual impurity. 27 And whoever touches these things shall be unclean, and shall wash his clothes and bathe himself in water and be unclean until the evening. 28 But if she is cleansed of her discharge, she shall count for herself seven days, and after that she shall be clean. 29 And on the eighth day she shall take two turtledoves or two pigeons and bring them to the priest, to the entrance of the tent of meeting. 30 And the priest shall use one for a sin offering and the other for a burnt offering. And the priest shall make atonement for her before the LORD for her unclean discharge.

‘A conclusion:

31 “Thus you shall keep the people of Israel separate from their uncleanness, lest they die in their uncleanness by defiling my tabernacle that is in their midst.” 32 This is the law for him who has a discharge and for him who has an emission of semen, becoming unclean thereby; 33 also for her who is unwell with her menstrual impurity, that is, for anyone, male or female, who has a discharge, and for the man who lies with a woman who is unclean.

God Involved in All of Life

Notice, first of all, this chapter begins with the now familiar words ‘The LORD spoke to Moses and Aaron, saying…’ This is God’s very word. This is the LORD God speaking to his people. This chapter is God breathed and profitable. And God is addressing some very personal, very private, very intimate, uncomfortable issues. This is important for us to grasp. God is involved in all of life. We want to compartmentalize. These are the things I talk about at church with my church friends. This is what I talk about when there are kids in the room. This is what I talk about with my spouse. This is what I talk about with the guys at work or at school. There are things I say in one setting that I would never dare to say in a different setting. We keep everything in its box. I punch the clock and put in my time at work, but I don’t bring my work home with me. I put in my time at church this week, but I don’t want to let God into the other areas of my life. There are public things and private things, and what I do in my private life is none of your business and none of God’s business either. This passage screams out ‘wrong!’ What you do in your private life matters greatly to God. God is intimately involved in every area of your life. Here is a familiar verse from Hebrews that is followed by one maybe less familiar that may make you a bit uncomfortable:

Hebrews 4:12 For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. 13 And no creature is hidden from his sight, but all are naked and exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must give account.

Not only are we held accountable for every action, whether public or secret, but we are accountable for the thoughts and intentions of the heart. God knows and God cares about every detail of our lives.

Also, there is no problem too personal that we should feel uncomfortable bringing to God. He knows about it already! He cares. He is eager to help.

Distinction Between Sin and Uncleanness

One thing we need to keep clear in our minds that will keep us from misunderstanding and misinterpreting a passage like this is that uncleanness does not equal sin. There are many things that are normal natural essential parts of life that make one unclean, but that does not mean that the activity is sinful. Sexual intimacy between a husband and wife is a good gift given by God, celebrated in the Song of Solomon, commanded in 1 Corinthians 7.

1 Corinthians 7:3 The husband should give to his wife her conjugal rights, and likewise the wife to her husband. …5 Do not deprive one another, except perhaps by agreement for a limited time, that you may devote yourselves to prayer; but then come together again, so that Satan may not tempt you because of your lack of self-control.

As an aside to our single people, if you are engaging in any kind of sexual intimacy, you are sinning against God and against the design of your own body. And to our married people, if you are withholding intimacy from your spouse outside of these very specific circumstances, you are sinning against God and against your spouse.

So if sex is a good gift from God, why did it make you unclean under the old covenant? Remember, clean and unclean are categories which established boundaries of action that kept a person from entering the presence of God in the tabernacle or temple. God was making it very clear that he was not to be worshiped by means of cult prostitution or fertility rites as was common in the religions of Israel’s neighbors. This was another way of drawing a distinction between God’s chosen people and the rest of the world. The danger that Israel constantly battled was the practices of her neighbors creeping in and corrupting the pure worship of God. From the golden calf to the sin with Moab under the direction of Balaam, to the kings of Israel setting up high places, there was a temptation to incorporate sexual practices into the worship of God. This was a way to prevent legitimate normal biological functions from defiling the holy presence of God.

Notice in this text that for the uncleanness caused by intimacy or by normal discharges, there were no sacrifices required, only washing and waiting. For abnormal discharges, a sacrifice was required, demonstrating that the issue was connected with death, decay and the curse, a result of the fall. [See revised outline]

Common Sense Wisdom from God

This passage contains some common sense practical wisdom that we take for granted, but it was way ahead of its time. Notice how frequently this chapter talks about washing in water? This basic hygiene would help prevent the spread of disease. Notice verse 11 stresses the importance of washing ones hands. In 1847 Ignaz Semmelweis made a connection between the high mortality rate in one maternity clinic and doctors who performed autopsies and then delivered babies. He demonstrated that simple hand washing could drastically reduce the mortality rate. His ideas were rejected. And this is some 3,000 years after Leviticus was written!

In this chapter uncleanness can come even through contact with an object that has been in contact with an unclean person. Saliva in verse 8 is seen as something that can convey uncleanness. While being helpful sanitary procedure, this may also help to explain some possible situations that would lead to ‘unintentional sin’ that required sacrifice in the earlier chapters of Leviticus. What if you didn’t know that the place you sat had been made unclean by someone who sat there before you?

Notice also a practical blessing of this passage. A woman during her monthly cycle is unclean for 7 days, which would mean that she was required to take a break and enjoy rest from the normal pressures and responsibilities of daily life.

Jesus Our Healer

But remember, we are not looking to Leviticus to find rules to obey. We are looking to find glimpses of Jesus, because the Bible is all about Jesus. This passage in Leviticus provides the background for an event recorded in Matthew 9, Mark 5 and Luke 8. We will look at Mark’s more detailed account.

Mark 5:24 …And a great crowd followed him and thronged about him. 25 And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, 26 and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. 27 She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. 28 For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” 29 And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. 30 And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” 31 And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?’” 32 And he looked around to see who had done it. 33 But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. 34 And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

Some things that Leviticus helps us understand: This woman was not supposed to be in a crowd. Everyone she bumped into in the crowd became unclean until evening. Even Jesus, by her touch would become ceremonially unclean. Her issue was a private thing. No one else knew about it. She apparently did a good job keeping it hidden. But it still affected everyone she came in contact with. They became unclean, and that was dangerous. This explains her ‘fear and trembling’ when she was called out for what she did. Not only fear of how Jesus would respond, but how the whole crowd would respond to her blatant violation of the cleanliness code. This gives greater importance to Jesus’ words ‘go in peace.’

This incident is also a reminder that Leviticus doesn’t give cures for problems. Leviticus identifies the problem and describes the consequences for having the problem, but it doesn’t give any prescription for what to do to fix the problem. If you have the disease, here’s what that means for you in society, and if somehow you get healed here’s the sacrifices you need to offer to be re-connected with God and society. This woman was desperate. She had suffered this chronic condition for 12 years. She was flat broke, having spent all she had seeking some help, but instead she got worse. You see, when we look for help in the wrong places, it often makes things worse.

Jesus is the missing cure for all the diseases in Leviticus. Jesus is the one so powerful that even touching the edge of his clothing in a crowd has transforming power. Jesus,is not defiled by the touch of sinners, but rather reverses the effects of sin. Jesus is YHWH Rapha (Ex.15:26) the Lord our healer.

Jesus ultimately is the one who can bring us back to God.

Leviticus 15:31 “Thus you shall keep the people of Israel separate from their uncleanness, lest they die in their uncleanness by defiling my tabernacle that is in their midst.”

The danger, graphically illustrated back in chapter 10 with Nadab and Abihu, was that entering God’s presence while in and unfit condition would result in death. God placed his tent in the middle of his people because he desires to be with his people, to be in fellowship with his people. But God is holy, and the presence of God for someone who is unclean is dangerous.

1 Peter 3:18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God…

Jesus died so that without condoning our sin or compromising God’s perfect holiness, we can be welcomed into the very presence of God. Jesus came and took our sin, took our uncleanness, in order to bring us to God.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

September 20, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 13:5a; Love is Not Rude

11/23 1 Corinthians 13:5a Love is Not Rude; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20141123_1cor13_5a.mp3

1 Corinthians 13 [SBLGNT]

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ ζηλοῖ ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν,

1 Corinthians 13 [ESV2011]

12:31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way.

13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing. 4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away. 9 For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10 but when the perfect comes, the partial will pass away. 11 When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways. 12 For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known. 13 So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

We are looking at love, God’s love, the love with which he loves us. We are looking at what love is, what love looks like, so we can know how to love one another. God’s love is long-tempered; it does not retaliate when wronged. His love is kind, doing good to the ungrateful and evil. His love is not displeased when good comes to someone else. His love is not bragging, claiming more than is true; and it is not puffed up, holding an inflated unsubstantiated view of self. Our love for others is to be a reflection of and a response to God’s love for us, an overflow of the fullness of being perfectly loved by a perfect God.

Definition of Rude

Next on Paul’s list is ‘Love is not rude, or love ‘doth not behave itself unseemly’ (KJV).

This particular verb ‘to act unbecomingly’ is used only two places in the New Testament, here and in 1 Corinthians 7:36.

1 Corinthians 7:36 If anyone thinks that he is not behaving properly [v; G807 ἀσχημονέω aschemoneo] toward his betrothed, if his passions are strong, and it has to be, let him do as he wishes: let them marry—it is no sin.

There it is translated ‘not behaving properly’. The Corinthians were thinking that it is more godly to live a celibate life than a married life. Responding to their questions, he affirms that sexual intimacy between husband and wife is not only good and right and beautiful, but is an obligation each owes to the other. For singles, if they have been supernaturally gifted by God for celibacy, that is good, but if not they should marry. In verse 36 he is addressing betrothed or engaged couples questioning whether it is more godly to stay single and not follow through with the marriage. Paul’s answer is that if they are so gifted, it is good to remain unmarried, but if their passions are strong and they need to be married, if they are acting unbecomingly or not behaving properly, they should marry. It seems in this context that the word primarily has sexual impropriety in mind. Sexual intimacy is appropriate only within the context of marriage, between husband and wife, so any expressions of sexual intimacy outside of the marriage covenant are improper. Notice, this directly addresses the justification many use today that ‘we love each other and we are planning on getting married some day, so it’s ok’. Paul is clear that before you say your vows and enter into the covenant of marriage, any sexual intimacy is improper. To claim love and then to act indecently or rudely is to contradict the very nature of love.

If we look at how this word group is used in the Old Testament, we see that it is often used to describe sexual impropriety. In Genesis 34,

Genesis 34:2 And when Shechem the son of Hamor the Hivite, the prince of the land, saw her, he seized her and lay with her and humiliated her. 3 And his soul was drawn to Dinah the daughter of Jacob. He loved the young woman and spoke tenderly to her. 4 So Shechem spoke to his father Hamor, saying, “Get me this girl for my wife.”

Understand, Shechem had very strong feelings for Dinah, he claimed to love her, and intended to marry her, willing to do anything for the right to marry her.

Genesis 34:7 The sons of Jacob had come in from the field as soon as they heard of it, and the men were indignant and very angry, because he had done an outrageous thing in Israel by lying with Jacob’s daughter, for such a thing must not be done.

The rape of Dinah was an outrageous act of impropriety. And This word group is used over 30 times in the section of Leviticus dealing with God’s instructions on appropriate and inappropriate sexual relationships.

Leviticus 18:6 “None of you shall approach any one of his close relatives to uncover nakedness. I am the LORD. [Also v.7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19; 20:11, 17,18,19,20,21 (32 x)]

In Deuteronomy 24 people used this word as grounds of divorce.

Deuteronomy 24:1 “When a man takes a wife and marries her, if then she finds no favor in his eyes because he has found some indecency in her, and he writes her a certificate of divorce and puts it in her hand and sends her out of his house, and she departs out of his house,

Because this word is used in more ways than sexual impropriety, this created a debate among the rabbis on what constituted legitimate grounds for divorce. Some believed that ‘some indecency’ was restricted to sexual immorality, while others extend it to anything that a wife did that the husband considered improper, even things as trivial as burning his toast.

This word group has a wide range of meaning in the Old Testament. Several times it is used to describe appropriate clothing to prevent indecent exposure. It is used of being shamed or publicly embarrassed. It is used in Deuteronomy 23 of the rudeness of, to bring it up to date, not flushing the toilet.

Deuteronomy 23:13 And you shall have a trowel with your tools, and when you sit down outside, you shall dig a hole with it and turn back and cover up your excrement. 14 Because the LORD your God walks in the midst of your camp, to deliver you and to give up your enemies before you, therefore your camp must be holy, so that he may not see anything indecent among you and turn away from you.

That’s simply gross or offensive. It’s indecent, it’s rude. His reason for not being gross or indecent is that the Lord walks among you.

This word is a compound word that is made up of a neutral root word and a negative prefix. We could liken it to the word ‘form’. A negative prefix gives it a negative meaning ‘malformed’ or ‘deformed’. If we put a positive prefix on it, we could form a word like ‘well-formed’. We can get a clearer picture of the meaning by looking at all the different forms of the word.

In 1 Corinthians 7, dealing with issues of marriage and singleness, he uses the positive form of this word:

1 Corinthians 7:35 I say this for your own benefit, not to lay any restraint upon you, but to promote good order [adj; G2158 εὐσχήμων euschemon] and to secure your undivided devotion to the Lord.

Paul’s intent is to promote both decency or propriety and undivided devotion to the Lord. Earlier in this chapter, he uses the root word, translated ‘form’, which points to the external condition.

1 Corinthians 7:29 This is what I mean, brothers: the appointed time has grown very short. From now on, let those who have wives live as though they had none, 30 and those who mourn as though they were not mourning, and those who rejoice as though they were not rejoicing, and those who buy as though they had no goods, 31 and those who deal with the world as though they had no dealings with it. For the present form [n; G4976 σχῆμα schema] of this world is passing away.

The fact that the external form of this world, good or bad, is passing away should cause us to hold loosely to the things of this world.

In 1 Corinthians 12, the chapter immediately preceding the love chapter, Paul uses the different forms of this word in his metaphor of the body as a picture of the church. His picture is that each of us individually are body parts, organs and limbs.

1 Corinthians 12:22 On the contrary, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23 and on those parts of the body that we think less honorable we bestow the greater honor , and our unpresentable [adj; G809 ἀσχήμων aschemon] parts are treated with greater modesty, [n; G2157 εὐσχημοσύνη euschemosune], 24 which our more presentable [adj; G2158 εὐσχήμων euschemon] parts do not require. But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, 25 that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another.

‘Unpresentable’ is the negative adjectival form; ‘greater modesty’ is the positive noun form; ‘more presentable’ is the positive adjective. Some parts of the body are unpresentable or indecent. They are not meant to be exposed. They need to be clothed and covered. This has to do specifically with outward form and appearance. Those parts of the body are necessary and their function is valuable to the health and well-being of the body. But it does not mean that those parts should be exposed to the public eye. They are shielded, protected, clothed.

Paul closes this section at the end of chapter 14 with this admonition:

1 Corinthians 14:40 But all things should be done decently [adv; G2156 εὐσχημόνως euschemonos] and in order.

All things in the church, among the believers must be done decently, with good propriety, with appropriateness, with proper sensitivity to social norms.

The Corinthians Were Rude

When we look at the conduct of the Corinthians, we see what this ought not to look like in the church of God. Some in the church in Corinth were engaged in inappropriate sexual conduct, conduct that would even offend pagans, and rather than being ashamed of it, they were proud. Some were visiting prostitutes. Married couples were depriving one another of their conjugal rights. Engaged couples were acting inappropriately. The Corinthians were shaming and defrauding one another in court rather than being wronged, rather than going privately to their brothers and working out their differences. In the context of a fellowship meal, each went ahead with his own meal, not waiting for the others. Women were disregarding discretion and propriety in the gatherings of the church. The Corinthians were rich, acting like kings while the apostles were ‘hungry, thirsty, poorly dressed, buffeted and homeless’ (4:11). They were brashly involving themselves in pagan feasts, not concerned that their participation in idolatry is unfaithfulness to the one true God. In their rude impropriety, they demonstrated a lack of genuine love for God or one another, and they damaged their reputation and hindered the advance of the gospel in their community. Love is not indecent.

God is Not Rude

God, who is love, is not rude. To better understand what love is, we look to the God who is love, and to the clearest expression of the invisible God, Jesus Christ his Son.

Never in any circumstance did Jesus act indecently. He always did what was appropriate. We can learn what is appropriate by looking to him. We have the threefold testimony at the end of his life from Pilate that ‘I find no fault in him’ (Jn.18:38; 19:4,6). Even when the religious leaders sought false testimony against him, they could find none (Mt.26:59-60).

Jesus was never offensive, but he did offend. He did violate social norms on occasion, for instance, when he allowed a woman of the street to interrupt a dinner party and wash his feet with her tears (Lk.7:36-50). He offended and violated the social norms when he told a story in which a Samaritan was the hero (Lk.10:25-37). He even told a story portraying the Father as entirely undignified (Lk.15:11-32). To the son who had spit in his face, demanded his inheritance, wished his father dead, wasted everything with prostitutes, and then returned home broken and desperate, the father gathered up his skirts, bared his legs and ran to meet him. He embraced him and kissed him and clothed him in his own best robe. This was an entirely undignified way for a respectable man to conduct himself. And this is how Jesus portrayed his Father!

To our modern sensibilities, we look at him making a whip of cords and driving both people and animals out of the temple courts to be an almost inexcusable act of inappropriate irrational violence (Jn.2:13-17). We think it rude to publicly call the scribes and pharisees ‘hypocrites, blind guides, serpents, brood of vipers, murderers, full of greed, self-indulgence, uncleanness, hypocrisy and lawlessness, a child of hell (Lk.23). We view this as rude and improper. But we need to let Jesus correct our view of what is proper and improper. When we violate social norms, it is typically out of a selfish disregard for others. ‘I don’t care what you think; I have the right to dress this way or act this way or live this way’. Jesus violated social norms, not out of a selfish disregard for others, but out of a deep care and love for others, seeking their best. He confronted sin in others, because he genuinely desires all to come to repentance, and repentance requires an awareness of sin.

To the adulteress who was dragged out from the very act, he extended forgiveness and forced justice to wait. It is appropriate for a just judge to punish sinners. But he extended mercy to guilty sinners, taking their shame on himself. He was humiliated, stripped bare, nailed to a wooden beam, and put on display for all to see. He was shamed, exposed, treated indecently. He was treated indecently for us. God is the one who clothed the nakedness of his people even after they rebelled against him. Jesus took our shame and clothes us in his own perfect righteousness.

The Follower of Jesus Must Not Be Rude

We love because he first loved us. We are not improper or needlessly offensive to others, because he conquered our shame and set us free to love others without rudeness or impropriety. Love is not improper. It is proper.

Paul encourages the Thessalonians in their love in 1 Thessalonians 4.

1 Thessalonians 4:9 Now concerning brotherly love you have no need for anyone to write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another, 10 for that indeed is what you are doing to all the brothers throughout Macedonia. But we urge you, brothers, to do this more and more, 11 and to aspire to live quietly, and to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we instructed you, 12 so that you may walk properly [adv; G2156 εὐσχημόνως euschemonos] before outsiders and be dependent on no one.

Propriety or decency has much to do with how others perceive us. It is outward. We are told here to ‘walk properly before outsiders’. I thought Christianity was more about the heart and not about outward appearances, after all, “man looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart” (1 Samuel 16:7). Yes, but Jesus said, “you will recognize them by their fruits” (Mt.7:20) and “out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks” (Mt.12:34). A genuine inward transformation will produce visible results. A caterpillar can no longer disguise himself as a caterpillar once he has gone through metamorphosis and become a butterfly.

Paul admonishes the Romans:

Romans 13:12 The night is far gone; the day is at hand. So then let us cast off the works of darkness and put on the armor of light. 13 Let us walk properly [adv; G2156 εὐσχημόνως euschemonos] as in the daytime, not in orgies and drunkenness, not in sexual immorality and sensuality, not in quarreling and jealousy. 14 But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires.

We must be who we are. If we have believed in Christ and been transformed by Christ, if in Christ you are a new creation then the old is passed away and the new has come (2Cor.5:17). We must no longer act as if we had not been transformed. Good propriety is a visible daytime type of walk. There are things propriety is not. It is not orgies, drunkenness, sexual immorality, sensuality, quarreling, jealousy, gratifying the desires of the flesh. These things are contrary to decency, and contrary to love.

Our culture is rude. We have turned crassness into a virtue. Our humor is rude. Our heroes are crude. Our entertainment industry can’t turn out a movie or even a cartoon without injecting some rude humor or inappropriate undertones. Children treat their parents with rudeness. Parents speak rudely to their children. We dishonor any kind of authority. Paul points us to the way of love in Ephesians 5.

Ephesians 5:1 Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. 2 And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God. 3 But sexual immorality and all impurity or covetousness must not even be named among you, as is proper among saints. 4 Let there be no filthiness nor foolish talk nor crude joking, which are out of place, but instead let there be thanksgiving.

We love as Christ loved us. Some things are incompatible with that kind of love. Biting witty comebacks, foolish talk, filthiness, immorality, impurity, covetousness are out of place among those who follow Jesus. In place of all that, our hearts are to overflow with thanksgiving to him for how he has loved us and gave himself up for us. Love is not rude.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 23, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 10:14-22; Fellowship with Christ

06/01 1 Corinthians 10:14-22 Fellowship with Christ;Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140601_1cor10_14-22.mp3

 

1 Corinthians 10 [SBLGNT]

14 Διόπερ, ἀγαπητοί μου, φεύγετε ἀπὸ τῆς εἰδωλολατρίας. 15 ὡς φρονίμοις λέγω· κρίνατε ὑμεῖς ὅ φημι. 16 τὸ ποτήριον τῆς εὐλογίας ὃ εὐλογοῦμεν, οὐχὶ κοινωνία ἐστὶν τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ Χριστοῦ; τὸν ἄρτον ὃν κλῶμεν, οὐχὶ κοινωνία τοῦ σώματος τοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐστιν; 17 ὅτι εἷς ἄρτος, ἓν σῶμα οἱ πολλοί ἐσμεν, οἱ γὰρ πάντες ἐκ τοῦ ἑνὸς ἄρτου μετέχομεν. 18 βλέπετε τὸν Ἰσραὴλ κατὰ σάρκα· οὐχ οἱ ἐσθίοντες τὰς θυσίας κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου εἰσίν; 19 τί οὖν φημι; ὅτι εἰδωλόθυτόν τί ἐστιν, ἢ ὅτι εἴδωλόν τί ἐστιν; 20 ἀλλ’ ὅτι ἃ θύουσιν, δαιμονίοις καὶ οὐ θεῷ θύουσιν, οὐ θέλω δὲ ὑμᾶς κοινωνοὺς τῶν δαιμονίων γίνεσθαι. 21 οὐ δύνασθε ποτήριον κυρίου πίνειν καὶ ποτήριον δαιμονίων· οὐ δύνασθε τραπέζης κυρίου μετέχειν καὶ τραπέζης δαιμονίων. 22 ἢ παραζηλοῦμεν τὸν κύριον; μὴ ἰσχυρότεροι αὐτοῦ ἐσμεν;

1 Corinthians 10 [ESV2011]

11 Now these things happened to them as an example, but they were written down for our instruction, on whom the end of the ages has come. 12 Therefore let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall. 13 No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

14 Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry. 15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say. 16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. 18 Consider the people of Israel: are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?

 

Chapters 8-10 of 1 Corinthians are a lengthy argument leading the readers to a godly conclusion. The Corinthians faced pressure to conform to their culture and participate in idolatry. Paul started by pointing out that although we all have knowledge, knowledge devoid of love is deadly. Living with the good of the other in mind is essential to following Jesus. Then he affirms the fact that they have rights and freedoms in Christ. But he holds himself up as an example of how a follower of Jesus can forgo legitimate God given rights for the sake of the gospel. At the end of chapter 9 he moves from the danger that my liberty may pose for a brother or sister in Christ, to the lethal effect it may have on my own relationship with God. He holds himself up again as an example of the danger of disqualification, or the danger of being demonstrated phony or false even after fruitful ministry. Then in chapter 10 he points to the example of Israel in the wilderness, most of whom played too close to the edge in seeking to gratify their desires, things like idolatry, sexual immorality, testing Christ by challenging God given leadership, things like grumbling and complaining about God’s good gifts. He warns them of the danger of self-confidence, he reminds them of the normalcy of temptation in the human experience, and he encourages them with the absolute faithfulness of God. He says:

12 Therefore let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall. 13 No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

And we might expect him to say, ‘therefore, you can plunge headlong into temptation, trusting in the faithfulness of God, confident that God will always provide a way of escape.’ But that is the opposite of what he says. Instead he says:

14 Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry.

Here he gives the clear conclusion his whole argument has been leading up to. How much can a Christian flirt with idolatry before he crosses the line? Paul’s answer is ‘No, that is the wrong question. Idolatry is lethal to your spiritual life. You should be asking ‘How far away from idolatry can I stay?’ He addresses them with a very affectionate term ‘my beloved’, and he says very clearly ‘flee from idolatry’. It doesn’t get much clearer than this. How much idolatry can I participate in before I jeopardize my relationship with God? Flee from idolatry! Run far far away. Run and never look back. Idolatry is not something to be toyed with. 603,548 Israelites fell victim to its treachery. Do not think that you can dabble with it and escape the same condemnation.

Idolatry is looking to anything outside of God to satisfy your desires, treasuring anything or anyone more than you treasure God. Idolatry is so pervasive in our society, maybe even more prevalent than it was in Corinth. There is so much that seeks to lead our hearts astray from God. To reveal the idolatry in your heart, simply look at where you spend your time, where you spend your energy, where you spend your money, what you talk about. These are the things that are most important to you, and God is jealous of your undivided affection.

Flee Immorality / Flee Idolatry

This passage is almost perfectly parallel to how Paul approaches the issue of sexual immorality in chapter 6. In 6:18 he says ‘Flee from sexual immorality’; In 10:14 he says ‘Flee from idolatry’. In 6:12 he says ‘all things are lawful for me, but not all things are helpful’, which he repeats verbatim in 10:23. He says in 6:15, 17 ‘Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? …he who is joined to the Lord becomes one spirit with him’ and in 10:16 he says ‘the cup …is a participation in the blood of Christ …the bread …is a participation in the body of Christ’. In 6:15 he asks ‘Shall I then take the members of Christ and make them members of a prostitute? Never!’ In 10:21 he says ‘You cannot drink of the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons’. In 6:20 he concludes ‘So glorify God in your body’ and in 10:31 he concludes ‘So, …whatever you do, do all to the glory of God’.

Think!

Paul is very clear in his conclusions, but he is wary of the dangers of a checklist. He demands that his readers think for themselves. He does not want formal external conformity to a set of regulations. He longs to see glad obedience from hearts and minds transformed by Jesus.

15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.

His readers have the capability to follow his logic. They have the capacity to think through his arguments. They can evaluate his conclusions. He doesn’t simply say ‘I’m the apostle, and you have to do it because I said so’. There are times when that is appropriate. But he invites them to thoughtfully engage with his flow of thought, trace out his line of reasoning and examine his conclusions. Think! Peter said that some of what Paul wrote is hard to understand! So engage your brains when you read this book. Paul uses words like ‘therefore’ and ‘so’ and ‘because’ and ‘in order that’. His words are not open to everyone’s interpretation. Words mean things. He intended to say something very definite, very specific, and if we are careful and thoughtful, we can understand what he says.

The Lord’s Supper

15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say. 16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. 18 Consider the people of Israel: are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?

Paul parallels the Lord’s supper, our celebration of communion, with the idolatrous celebrations that the Corinthians were tempted to participate in. He demonstrates the incompatibility of intimacy with Christ and intimacy with demons.

He first refers to the cup. He calls it the cup of blessing. Jesus at the last supper with his disciples, blessed and gave thanks for the bread and the wine. When we celebrate the Lord’s supper to remember him, we bless and give thanks for the bread and the cup. It is the cup of blessing, the cup that Jesus blessed, that we also bless. Paul asks, ‘is it not a participation in the blood of Christ?’ When we take and drink the cup, we participate in the blood of Christ. The word is κοινωνία; communion, fellowship, or participation. When we drink the cup, we participate in the blood of Christ, all that it means for us. Jesus said that the cup was ‘my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins’ (Mt.26:28). A covenant is a binding committed relationship, often solemnized with blood. Jesus instituted the new covenant, the new relationship with God through his blood. Jesus offered his blood as a sacrifice for our sins, so that we could be forgiven and enter into a right relationship with God. The wages of our sin is death, and Jesus’ blood was shed, his life was poured out as a payment for our sin. By taking the cup and drinking, we are saying that we are participants in that new covenant, part of the people who were purchased with Christ’s blood, those who have been forgiven by trusting in the finished work of Christ for us.

Next, he mentions the bread that we break. ‘Breaking bread’ was a way of describing eating a meal together, and it was used to describe what believers did when they remembered Jesus with bread and wine. In the culture, to sit down together and share a meal created a bond of relationship and obligation. Tearing off bread from the same loaf, dipping in shared dishes and eating together was an intimate way of extending friendship. You would not sit down at the table and share a dish with someone you considered unclean or unworthy of your company. Jesus welcomes us to his table to share a meal with us. Jesus took the bread, and after blessing it, he broke it and said ‘this is my body which is given for you’ (Lk.22:19). The broken bread points to the human body of Jesus which was broken for us. By eating the bread, we participate in the body of Christ. We are saying that we are spiritually hungry and broken, and we benefit from the death of Jesus. We receive nourishment and sustenance from him. We are connected with him.

This is very different from the refreshments served by the stewardesses mid flight. They roll the carts down the aisles and offer you a choice of beverages to quench your thirst, and maybe a small pack of crackers to munch on. The napkin they give you may have the logo of the airline printed on it, but by drinking, you are not swearing your allegiance to that airline.

The cup of blessing and the bread broken are the meal we share at the table of Christ. He is our host, we are his guests, and we fellowship with him at his table. We enjoy the benefits he provides. We are connected to him. We are obliged to him.

Unity with Community

Verse 17 takes this a step further. The one bread that we all share unites us not only with Christ, but also with one another.

17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.

There is a community formed around our communion with Christ. If you are in a binding committed relationship with Jesus through participation in his finished work on the cross, and I also am in that same binding committed relationship with Jesus, then we are bound to one another through our common bond to Christ. Those who participate in the new covenant meal are connected to our Lord Jesus and to one another.

Fellowship with Demons

Paul again points back to Israel as an example.

18 Consider the people of Israel: are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons.

The text says ‘consider Israel according to the flesh’. Having just recounted the failure of the exodus generation, most of whom fell in the wilderness because of unbelief, this verse is likely pointing to fleshly or unbelieving Israel. Those who ate of the sacrifices made to the golden calf, those who ‘sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play’ had identified themselves with everything that altar stood for. Whatever altar you eat at, you become a participant with the deity that is being worshiped there, and you become connected with the other worshipers there.

This raises a question. Paul is suggesting that if you worship at a pagan altar, there is a real connection made with the one behind that altar. But Paul said in 8:4 ‘we know that an idol has no real existence and that there is no God but one’. Is Paul now saying that the idol does have a real existence? He clarifies. He is not saying that the block of wood or stone is anything but a block of wood or stone. But he is saying that there is an unseen reality behind the image. Paul is drawing on information from the Old Testament. When the people offered sacrifices to the calf, the calf was nothing but an inanimate statue made to look like an animal. But the calf idol became a focal point for worship directed to someone other than the one true God. It became a means of worshiping demons.

Leviticus 17 requires that all the sacrifices of the people be brought to the one place of sacrifice that God had authorized, so that they would not be worshiping demons.

Leviticus 17:7 So they shall no more sacrifice their sacrifices to goat demons, after whom they whore. This shall be a statute forever for them throughout their generations.

Paul’s language reflects the song of Moses in Deuteronomy 32

Deuteronomy 32:15 … then he forsook God who made him and scoffed at the Rock of his salvation. 16 They stirred him to jealousy with strange gods; with abominations they provoked him to anger. 17 They sacrificed to demons that were no gods, to gods they had never known, to new gods that had come recently, whom your fathers had never dreaded.

…21 They have made me jealous with what is no god; they have provoked me to anger with their idols. …

Moses connects the misplaced worship of the people with demon worship. We were made to worship. If we refuse to worship the one true God, we will worship success or power or possessions or family or pleasure. When we fail to treasure the one true God, and treasure other people or things, we turn our worship away from God and to demons. There is no possibility of being neutral.

Psalm 106 describes faithless Israel later, at the time of the conquest.

Psalm 106:34 They did not destroy the peoples, as the LORD commanded them, 35 but they mixed with the nations and learned to do as they did. 36 They served their idols, which became a snare to them. 37 They sacrificed their sons and their daughters to the demons; 38 they poured out innocent blood, the blood of their sons and daughters, whom they sacrificed to the idols of Canaan, and the land was polluted with blood. 39 Thus they became unclean by their acts, and played the whore in their deeds.

All these passages connect idolatry with demon worship. Lucifer desired to be worshiped as God. He and the angels who followed him seek to divert worship from God to other things. When we listen to their lie and are persuaded to seek pleasure and fulfillment in other things, we are participating with demons.

20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?

Jesus said ‘no one can serve two masters’ (Mt.6:24). We cannot sit down at the table of the Lord on Sundays and then seek to find satisfaction at the table of demons the rest of the week. Jesus will not tolerate it. He demands our undivided devotion, our absolute affection. We must choose whose table we will feast at.

14 Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

June 1, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 10:5-10; The Danger of Desire

05/04 1 Corinthians 10:5-10 The Deadly Dangers of Desire;Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140504_1cor10_5-10.mp3

 

1 Corinthians 10 [SBLGNT]

1 Οὐ θέλω γὰρ ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν, ἀδελφοί, ὅτι οἱ πατέρες ἡμῶν πάντες ὑπὸ τὴν νεφέλην ἦσαν καὶ πάντες διὰ τῆς θαλάσσης διῆλθον, 2 καὶ πάντες εἰς τὸν Μωϋσῆν ἐβαπτίσαντο ἐν τῇ νεφέλῃ καὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ, 3 καὶ πάντες τὸ αὐτὸ πνευματικὸν βρῶμα ἔφαγον 4 καὶ πάντες τὸ αὐτὸ πνευματικὸν ἔπιον πόμα, ἔπινον γὰρ ἐκ πνευματικῆς ἀκολουθούσης πέτρας, ἡ πέτρα δὲ ἦν ὁ Χριστός· 5 ἀλλ’ οὐκ ἐν τοῖς πλείοσιν αὐτῶν ηὐδόκησεν ὁ θεός, κατεστρώθησαν γὰρ ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ. 6 Ταῦτα δὲ τύποι ἡμῶν ἐγενήθησαν, εἰς τὸ μὴ εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἐπιθυμητὰς κακῶν, καθὼς κἀκεῖνοι ἐπεθύμησαν. 7 μηδὲ εἰδωλολάτραι γίνεσθε, καθώς τινες αὐτῶν· ὥσπερ γέγραπται· Ἐκάθισεν ὁ λαὸς φαγεῖν καὶ πεῖν, καὶ ἀνέστησαν παίζειν. 8 μηδὲ πορνεύωμεν, καθώς τινες αὐτῶν ἐπόρνευσαν, καὶ ἔπεσαν μιᾷ ἡμέρᾳ εἴκοσι τρεῖς χιλιάδες. 9 μηδὲ ἐκπειράζωμεν τὸν Χριστόν, καθώς τινες αὐτῶν ἐπείρασαν, καὶ ὑπὸ τῶν ὄφεων ἀπώλλυντο. 10 μηδὲ γογγύζετε, καθάπερ τινὲς αὐτῶν ἐγόγγυσαν, καὶ ἀπώλοντο ὑπὸ τοῦ ὀλοθρευτοῦ. 11 ταῦτα δὲ τυπικῶς συνέβαινεν ἐκείνοις, ἐγράφη δὲ πρὸς νουθεσίαν ἡμῶν, εἰς οὓς τὰ τέλη τῶν αἰώνων κατήντηκεν. 12 ὥστε ὁ δοκῶν ἑστάναι βλεπέτω μὴ πέσῃ, 13 πειρασμὸς ὑμᾶς οὐκ εἴληφεν εἰ μὴ ἀνθρώπινος· πιστὸς δὲ ὁ θεός, ὃς οὐκ ἐάσει ὑμᾶς πειρασθῆναι ὑπὲρ ὃ δύνασθε, ἀλλὰ ποιήσει σὺν τῷ πειρασμῷ καὶ τὴν ἔκβασιν τοῦ δύνασθαι ὑπενεγκεῖν.

1 Corinthians 9-10 [ESV2011]

24 Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it. 25 Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. 26 So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air. 27 But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified.

1 For I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, that our fathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, 2 and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea, 3 and all ate the same spiritual food, 4 and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual Rock that followed them, and the Rock was Christ. 5 Nevertheless, with most of them God was not pleased, for they were overthrown in the wilderness. 6 Now these things took place as examples for us, that we might not desire evil as they did. 7 Do not be idolaters as some of them were; as it is written, “The people sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play.” 8 We must not indulge in sexual immorality as some of them did, and twenty-three thousand fell in a single day. 9 We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did and were destroyed by serpents, 10 nor grumble, as some of them did and were destroyed by the Destroyer. 11 Now these things happened to them as an example, but they were written down for our instruction, on whom the end of the ages has come. 12 Therefore let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall. 13 No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

These warnings are serious. Paul mentioned the potential for his own disqualification. He brings up the example of Israel in the wilderness to warn us that flirtation with idolatry can be lethal. All the Israelites shared in the blessings of being part of God’s people. They all were under the protection of God, were being led by God, had experienced rescue from slavery, their enemies were destroyed by God, they were continually being sustained and provided for by God, and yet with most of them, with most of them God was not pleased. Out of 603,550, only 2 entered the promised land. Joshua and Caleb. Two. The rest were overthrown in the wilderness. 23,000 fell in a single day. Some were destroyed by serpents. Some were destroyed by the Destroyer. 603,448 Israelite corpses were strewn across the wilderness over their 40 years of wandering.

Idolatry is serious. Idolatry is deadly. Idolatry can separate you from God forever. Idolatry is not to be taken lightly. We tend to think of idolatry only as bowing to a little statue or attending a pagan temple, and I doubt that many of us do those things. But idolatry is so much deeper and more prevalent than that, as we will see in this passage. Idolatry can take many different forms. At its core, idolatry is loving anything more than God. Jesus told us that the most important commandment is:

Mark 12:29 Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ 31 The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”

God is to be loved more than anything else because God is infinitely more deserving of our allegiance and affection. To value something or someone higher than God is to lie and overestimate the value of that person or that thing, and to dishonor and lie about God. For God to allow any idolatry would be unrighteous and unloving, encouraging us in the idea that there is something greater, something better, something more worthy, something more satisfying out there than God himself. God tells us that his name is Jealous (Ex.34:14), that he is a jealous God , not in the petty self-centered ways that we usually think of jealousy, but because he knows there is no true joy, true satisfaction, true fulfillment outside of a relationship with himself. He is jealous of our affection for our eternal good. The danger of idolatry is grave. God will not tolerate idolatry because in idolatry we turn away from the only source of true joy and look elsewhere.

Do Not Desire Evil

Our text says:

1 Corinthians 10:5 Nevertheless, with most of them God was not pleased, for they were overthrown in the wilderness. 6 Now these things took place as examples for us, that we might not desire evil as they did.

God was not pleased with most of them. They were overthrown in the wilderness. That happened as an example for us, that we might not desire evil as they did. Their corpses strewn in the wilderness are a warning to us. What do you desire? What is it that you want? Human desire is a powerful thing. Advertising seeks to influence our desire. If we can be shown that we lack something, if we can be convinced that we need something, that life will go better if we have something, if we are persuaded that we will be happier and more fulfilled with that something, our desire will be stirred, and we will go after that something, spending our hard earned money, time, and energy to satisfy that desire. Many desires are good and healthy. Hunger, thirst are important desires. Without proper food and drink, we will die. Desire for comfort and safety is normal. Extreme temperatures are lethal for humans. But even good desires can be elevated in unhealthy ways. We need to eat, we need fuel to keep our bodies functioning, but often we don’t stop when we are full. It tastes so good – I want just one more bite. Or we are very particular about what we eat. It has to be prepared just so. These are different forms of gluttony, and the bible calls gluttony sin. In our desire for comfort we can become discontent with our house or our car or our job or our climate or our health. It’s too hot or too cold or too dry or too humid or too much snow or not enough, the seasons are too extreme, there’s no change in seasons, it’s too busy, there’s nothing to do. The desire for satisfying relationships is good and natural, but we often place undue weight on those relationships. I wish I had a husband or a wife, I wish my husband or wife was different than they are, I wish I had a different husband or a different wife, I wish I didn’t have a husband or a wife. I wish I had children, I wish I could spend more time with my children, I wish my children were better behaved, more responsible, more respectful, I wish they would leave. I wish I had friends, I wish my friends would be more thoughtful, I wish they would invite me to more things, I wish they would stop inviting me to things, I wish they would leave me alone.

We have so many competing desires. Desires are a powerful force in our lives. Desire determines so much of what we think about, what we spend our time and energy and resources on, how we feel, what our attitude is, and what we do. This is why God warns us about the dangers of our desires. Secondary desires can become primary, and when a secondary desire is elevated to first importance, it it becomes evil. Our primary desire must be for God and God alone. Other desires, even good desires, become evil when they compete with our desire for God. The Psalmist says:

Psalm 73:25 Whom have I in heaven but you? And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you. 26 My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.

God is my portion. I desire nothing besides you. Actions result from desires. Desires flow out of the heart. Only a heart transformed by Jesus treasures God above all else.

1 Corinthians 10:6 Now these things took place as examples for us, that we might not desire evil as they did.

This word ‘desire’ is taken from Numbers 11.

Numbers 11:4 Now the rabble that was among them had a strong craving. And the people of Israel also wept again and said, “Oh that we had meat to eat! 5 We remember the fish we ate in Egypt that cost nothing, the cucumbers, the melons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic. 6 But now our strength is dried up, and there is nothing at all but this manna to look at.”

…10 Moses heard the people weeping throughout their clans, everyone at the door of his tent. And the anger of the LORD blazed hotly, and Moses was displeased.

Listen. Words like ‘ruthless’ and ‘bitter’ described their slavery in Egypt. They groaned and cried out for rescue. God supernaturally rescued his people from cruel slavery in Egypt. He rained down supernatural bread from heaven to provide for their every need. Now they complain about God’s good provision, their memories are distorted, and they long for the food they ate back in the bad old days of Egyptian slavery. We are appalled at their ingratitude, but how often do we do the very same. We are discontent with what God has given to us, with the lot he has assigned to us. We want something else. Anything else.

It is interesting how God responded to their ungrateful craving.

Psalm 106:14 But they had a wanton craving in the wilderness, and put God to the test in the desert; 15 he gave them what they asked, but sent a wasting disease among them.

He gave them what they asked for. Be careful what you ask for.

Numbers 11:18 And say to the people, ‘Consecrate yourselves for tomorrow, and you shall eat meat, for you have wept in the hearing of the LORD, saying, “Who will give us meat to eat? For it was better for us in Egypt.” Therefore the LORD will give you meat, and you shall eat. 19 You shall not eat just one day, or two days, or five days, or ten days, or twenty days, 20 but a whole month, until it comes out at your nostrils and becomes loathsome to you, because you have rejected the LORD who is among you and have wept before him, saying, “Why did we come out of Egypt?”’”

They wanted meat. God gave them meat to eat. Meat so abundant that it came out their nostrils. God gave them over to their own desires to demonstrate that what they thought would satisfy would only become loathsome to them. They had rejected not just manna, they had rejected the LORD and his salvation.

Numbers 11:33 While the meat was yet between their teeth, before it was consumed, the anger of the LORD was kindled against the people, and the LORD struck down the people with a very great plague. 34 Therefore the name of that place was called Kibroth-hattaavah, because there they buried the people who had the craving.

Idolatry

This root sin of desiring, or craving, led to four other symptomatic sins. In verse 7 idolatry, in verse 8 sexual immorality, in verse 9 putting Christ to the test, and in verse 10 grumbling.

7 Do not be idolaters as some of them were; as it is written, “The people sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play.”

One of the symptoms of wrong desires is idolatry. Our desire for something we don’t have becomes so strong that we want it more than we want God. That is idolatry.

Exodus 32:1 When the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from the mountain, the people gathered themselves together to Aaron and said to him, “Up, make us gods who shall go before us. As for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.”

The people had seen a manifestation of God so real, so awesome, so terrible that they begged Moses to mediate between them and God for fear that if God were to speak to them again directly they would die. Moses is up on the mountain 40 days, receiving instruction from God for them. God is manifest in cloud and consuming fire at the top of the mountain. While this is going on, in their ignorance they become so impatient that they demand a substitute god. Having experienced the reality, they quickly settle for a substitute.

Exodus 32:4 And he received the gold from their hand and fashioned it with a graving tool and made a golden calf. And they said, “These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!” …6 And they rose up early the next day and offered burnt offerings and brought peace offerings. And the people sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play.

They prefer something ‘real’, something tangible, something material, something they can contribute to, something they can see and touch rather than the unseen supernatural reality of the true God.

Immorality

If you think back to the context of the culture that Paul is addressing, the Corinthians are arguing for the right to eat meat in pagan temples. These idolatrous temples often offered immorality as a part of the worship. Paul makes that connection here. “The people sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play.” The phrase ‘rose up to play’ has sexual connotations. Idolatry often leads to immorality. Unfaithfulness to God leads to sexual unfaithfulness.

8 We must not indulge in sexual immorality as some of them did, and twenty-three thousand fell in a single day.

At the suggestion of Balaam (Num.31:16), who was unable to curse Israel for pay, the Moabites sent their daughters to lead astray the men of Israel so that God would be displeased with them.

Numbers 25:1 While Israel lived in Shittim, the people began to whore with the daughters of Moab. 2 These invited the people to the sacrifices of their gods, and the people ate and bowed down to their gods. 3 So Israel yoked himself to Baal of Peor. And the anger of the LORD was kindled against Israel.

Twenty-three thousand fell in a single day. God takes unfaithfulness, our unfaithfulness to him, seriously.

Putting Christ to the Test

9 We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did and were destroyed by serpents,

This refers back to Numbers 21.

Numbers 21:5 And the people spoke against God and against Moses, “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness? For there is no food and no water, and we loathe this worthless food.” 6 Then the LORD sent fiery serpents among the people, and they bit the people, so that many people of Israel died.

This is near the end of the 40 years in the wilderness. God had consistently and repeatedly provided for their needs. Psalm 78 links this testing God with food and their desire for things other than what God had provided.

Psalms 78:18 They tested God in their heart by demanding the food they craved. 19 They spoke against God, saying, “Can God spread a table in the wilderness?

They tested God’s patience by rejecting what God gave and demanding what they craved. Here we have yet another clear affirmation that Jesus Christ is God.

Grumbling

Last but not least, grumbling.

10 nor grumble, as some of them did and were destroyed by the Destroyer.

This is a tough one. We don’t know exactly what event Paul is referring to here, because the people seemed always to be grumbling. They grumbled about food, they grumbled about water, it seems grumbling was the sound they made. On hearing the report of the spies who reported giants in the promised land, we are told in Numbers 14:

Numbers 14:1 Then all the congregation raised a loud cry, and the people wept that night. 2 And all the people of Israel grumbled against Moses and Aaron. The whole congregation said to them, “Would that we had died in the land of Egypt! Or would that we had died in this wilderness! 3 Why is the LORD bringing us into this land, to fall by the sword? Our wives and our little ones will become a prey. Would it not be better for us to go back to Egypt?” 4 And they said to one another, “Let us choose a leader and go back to Egypt.”

This grumbling is grumbling against God’s chosen leaders. Grumbling is the sound of discontent. I don’t like what I have been given.

Numbers 14:26 And the LORD spoke to Moses and to Aaron, saying, 27 “How long shall this wicked congregation grumble against me? I have heard the grumblings of the people of Israel, which they grumble against me. 28 Say to them, ‘As I live, declares the LORD, what you have said in my hearing I will do to you: 29 your dead bodies shall fall in this wilderness, and of all your number, listed in the census from twenty years old and upward, who have grumbled against me, 30 not one shall come into the land where I swore that I would make you dwell, except Caleb the son of Jephunneh and Joshua the son of Nun.

We might tend to think that grumbling is not really that bad. Murmuring. Complaining. Everyone does it. God takes it personally. He is the giver of all good gifts. When we grumble, we express our discontent with what he has given. It was the grumbling of the congregation that caused the Lord to sentence a whole generation to fall in the wilderness. Paul says this is a warning for us. Grumbling is the opposite of worship. Grumbling is the opposite of wonder. Grumbling is the opposite of gratitude. Saved from slavery. Through the midst of the sea on dry ground. Manna falls from heaven. Water gushes from the rock. Wonder, worship, gratitude. God promises to give the land, including the giants, into your hand. Be amazed, give thanks, worship. Receive the good gift from his gracious hand.

The cure for idolatry, the cure for lust, the cure for grumbling is to be so satisfied in God that there is honestly nothing else you desire.

Psalm 73:25 Whom have I in heaven but you? And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you. 26 My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.

Gorge yourself on the riches of Christ. Sit at the Lord’s table and feast on the gospel. Let him be your portion. Be so satisfied with who he is that you begin to see the pleasures of this world as the cheap imitations that they really are. 

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

May 4, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 7:6-9; The Un-Married

11/10 1 Corinthians 7:6-9 The Un-Married;Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20131110_1cor7_6-9.mp3

1Cor 7 [SBLGNT]

1 Περὶ δὲ ὧν ἐγράψατε, καλὸν ἀνθρώπῳ γυναικὸς μὴ ἅπτεσθαι· 2 διὰ δὲ τὰς πορνείας ἕκαστος τὴν ἑαυτοῦ γυναῖκα ἐχέτω, καὶ ἑκάστη τὸν ἴδιον ἄνδρα ἐχέτω. 3 τῇ γυναικὶ ὁ ἀνὴρ τὴν ὀφειλὴν ἀποδιδότω, ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ ἡ γυνὴ τῷ ἀνδρί. 4 ἡ γυνὴ τοῦ ἰδίου σώματος οὐκ ἐξουσιάζει ἀλλὰ ὁ ἀνήρ· ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ ὁ ἀνὴρ τοῦ ἰδίου σώματος οὐκ ἐξουσιάζει ἀλλὰ ἡ γυνή. 5 μὴ ἀποστερεῖτε ἀλλήλους, εἰ μήτι ἂν ἐκ συμφώνου πρὸς καιρὸν ἵνα σχολάσητε τῇ προσευχῇ καὶ πάλιν ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ ἦτε, ἵνα μὴ πειράζῃ ὑμᾶς ὁ Σατανᾶς διὰ τὴν ἀκρασίαν ὑμῶν. 6 τοῦτο δὲ λέγω κατὰ συγγνώμην, οὐ κατ’ ἐπιταγήν. 7 θέλω δὲ πάντας ἀνθρώπους εἶναι ὡς καὶ ἐμαυτόν· ἀλλὰ ἕκαστος ἴδιον ἔχει χάρισμα ἐκ θεοῦ, ὁ μὲν οὕτως, ὁ δὲ οὕτως. 8 Λέγω δὲ τοῖς ἀγάμοις καὶ ταῖς χήραις, καλὸν αὐτοῖς ἐὰν μείνωσιν ὡς κἀγώ· 9 εἰ δὲ οὐκ ἐγκρατεύονται, γαμησάτωσαν, κρεῖττον γάρ ἐστιν γαμῆσαι ἢ πυροῦσθαι.

1Cor 7 [ESV2011]

7:1 Now concerning the matters about which you wrote: “It is good for a man not to have sexual relations with a woman.” 2 But because of the temptation to sexual immorality, each man should have his own wife and each woman her own husband. 3 The husband should give to his wife her conjugal rights, and likewise the wife to her husband. 4 For the wife does not have authority over her own body, but the husband does. Likewise the husband does not have authority over his own body, but the wife does. 5 Do not deprive one another, except perhaps by agreement for a limited time, that you may devote yourselves to prayer; but then come together again, so that Satan may not tempt you because of your lack of self-control.

6 Now as a concession, not a command, I say this. 7 I wish that all were as I myself am. But each has his own gift from God, one of one kind and one of another. 8 To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is good for them to remain single as I am. 9 But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to burn with passion.

Paul is addressing issues that the church in Corinth had written him about. Chapter 7 deals with sexual relationships between men and women. He had already addressed incest, adultery, homosexuality, prostitution, and other forms of sexual immorality in chapters 5 and 6. His conclusion was that those who continue to practice such things, along with idolaters, thieves, the greedy, drunkards, revilers and swindlers will not inherit the kingdom of God. Not that there is no hope for someone who has sinned in any of these ways. He makes it clear that some of the believers in Corinth had fallen into all of these categories. “But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God” (6:11). There is forgiveness and hope for every sinner who turns to Jesus for forgiveness and cleansing.

At the beginning of chapter 7, he addresses the teaching that was circulating in Corinth “it is good for a man not to touch a woman”. This is simply not true in all circumstances. He clarifies that for the married, they have obligated themselves to their spouse. He forbids them to deprive one another and encourages enjoyment of sexual activity within marriage as a defense against Satanic attack.

He will go on to address questions about the unmarried, widows and widowers, the married, those married to an unbeliever, issues of divorce and remarriage, and single people. He gives much practical teaching and pastoral counsel to people who find themselves in various circumstances. This is a difficult passage, not only because the subject matter is very personal, but some of Paul’s vocabulary is open to differing interpretations. With God’s help, we will do our best to work our way through this passage together.

A Concession Not A Command

1 Corinthians 7:6 Now as a concession, not a command, I say this.

Verse 6 is a difficult verse. We have to try to understand what ‘this’ refers to. What is it that Paul is saying that is not a command but only a concession? Different interpretations have been suggested. Some see ‘this’ as referring to what immediately precedes, the requirement for a married couple to come back together again after a time of abstinence. But he is clearly commanding that they come back together again, and as a defense against Satanic attack. Some have suggested that all of verse 5, where he allows temporary abstinence by mutual agreement for a limited time and for the purpose of prayer is a concession and not a command. In other words, I am not mandating that married couples abstain for prayer, but is conceding to this practice within the stated conditions. This is a possibility, but he has already made it clear that abstaining is not a command by his wording ‘except perhaps’. Some take ‘this’ to refer back to the whole of verses 2-5, that his command that each man should have his own wife and each woman should have her own husband is not a command but a concession. He is not mandating marriage for all; in the next verse he holds up his wish that all would remain single as he himself is. He discusses the value and advantages of singleness in verses 32-35. This is a good possibility. Others take ‘this’ to refer forward to what he is about to say. His following wish that all were single like himself is a concession not a command. He will go on to say that although he wishes that all could be fully devoted to pleasing the Lord as he himself is, he is aware that not all have the same gifting he has and for them this would not be good. Both of these last two interpretations fit well with what Paul says in this passage, and both are true. Not every person is commanded to be married, and not every person is commanded to live a life of celibacy.

Spiritual Gifting in Marriage and Singleness

1 Corinthians 7:6 Now as a concession, not a command, I say this. 7 I wish that all were as I myself am. But each has his own gift from God, one of one kind and one of another.

Paul will talk quite a bit in 1 Corinthians about spiritual gifts. In chapters 12-14 he will talk about things like speaking in tongues, utterances of wisdom and knowledge, gifts of faith and healing, prophecy, distinguishing spirits, and working miracles. In chapter 1, he thanked God that the Corinthians were “not lacking in any spiritual gift” (1:7). Here in chapter 7, dealing with marriage and singleness, he refers to another kind of grace-gift from God. Each has his own gift from God, one of one kind and one of another. The Corinthians were eager to outdo one another with their spirituality. If it was considered more spiritual to live a celibate life, the married people were willing to put away their spouses to win the title of spirituality. Paul says ‘stop it!you’re playing with fire!’ What is more spiritual is to see how God has uniquely gifted you as an individual and use your gifts for the glory of God. Paul here is claiming that the celibate life, which he practices, is a grace-gift from God. And equally so, marriage is a grace-gift from God, each to be used to bring glory to God. Paul was given the gift of contentment in celibacy. Many are given the gift of contentment in marriage. Each has his own gift from God, one of one kind, one of another. Paul will list advantages he sees in singleness, especially considering the circumstances in which they were then living, but he holds both singleness and marriage up as valuable gifts from our good God. If you are gifted by God with singleness, it is better for you to remain single. If you are gifted by God for marriage, it is better that you marry. Going back to the statement of the Corinthians ‘it is good for a man not to touch a woman’ Paul would say ‘yes!, if you are gifted by God for singleness.’ But if you are gifted by God for marriage, then each one should enjoy his or her own spouse as a good gift of God.

To the Unmarried and the Widows

1 Corinthians 7:8 To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is good for them to remain single as I am.

Here is another challenge in interpretation. To whom is Paul referring when he says ‘unmarried’? The word itself can refer to anyone who is currently without a spouse for whatever reason. It can refer to singles who have never been married, or it can refer to widows or widowers or the divorced or separated. If Paul is using the word in this broad general sense, then ‘the widows’ is one subcategory of ‘the unmarried’, and we could translate ‘to the unmarried, especially to the widows.’ Paul uses this word in verse 11 to refer to the wife who is separated from her husband. In verse 34 he uses this word to distinguish the unmarried woman from the virgin. Frequently in this chapter Paul gives equal treatment to the male and female counterpart in each situation, and he will deal specifically with the ‘never been marrieds’ in verses 25 and following, so we could translate verse 8 as ‘to the formerly marrieds’, or ‘to the widowers and the widows’.

Whether he is addressing the broad category of unmarrieds or the specific categories of the formerly marrieds, his advice is ‘it is good for them to remain as I am’. We will see as we work our way through this passage that this is Paul’s repeated advice in a number of different situations given their present circumstances. It is good to remain as you are. If you are married, stay married. If you are single, stay single. Don’t seek to change your status. Not that it is wrong to change your status, but it is good to remain as you are.

Was Paul Married?

This raises an interesting biographical question about the Apostle Paul. It is clear from this and other passages that Paul lived a celibate life. But had he ever been married? That question is more difficult to answer. It is possible that Paul was never married, in which case he tells the widows to remain content in celibacy as he is. It is possible that Paul was married and his wife either died and he never remarried, or that his wife left him, possibly because of his conversion to Christianity. This is speculation, based largely on Jewish tradition. The reasoning goes like this; Paul claimed to be a “Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee” (Phil.3:5). He says “And I was advancing in Judaism beyond many of my own age among my people, so extremely zealous was I for the traditions of my fathers” (Gal.1:14). Later Jewish traditions tell us that men by the age of twenty were expected to be married, so for Paul to have advanced in Judaism as he claims would imply that he must have been married. Some take his statement in Acts 26:10 about his former persecution of Christians, “when they were put to death I cast my vote against them” to mean that he was a voting member of the Sanhedrin, and later laws about Sanhedrin membership require a man to be married. The bottom line is that none of this is conclusive. The bible does not tell us, and we cannot say with certainty whether Paul was ever married or not. All that we are told is that he was not married at the time he wrote his New Testament letters. He says in chapter 9:

1 Corinthians 9:5 Do we not have the right to take along a believing wife, as do the other apostles and the brothers of the Lord and Cephas?

He claims to have the right to be married, but he did not take advantage of that right.

For Those Without Self-Control

1 Corinthians 7:8 To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is good for them to remain single as I am. 9 But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to burn with passion.

For the unmarried and widows, it is good to remain unmarried. But that is not the only thing permitted, and that may not be the best thing for them. He says that it is good to remain unmarried, but if they are not self-controlled, they must marry. Unfortunately, this verse is difficult to translate without implying that the lack of self-control is negative. May read this and conclude that Paul has a low view of marriage, which is only a vent for the weak who can’t control their sexual urges. But that is to misunderstand the text. The lack of self-control in this verse is not negative or derogatory. We might be better to paraphrase it ‘if they are not predisposed to continence’ or ‘if they don’t have the gift of celibacy’. There is no negativity toward those who have a different gifting. In fact, the strength of sexual drive may be one clear indicator of gifting by God for marriage or celibacy. Each has his own gift from God, one of one kind and one of another. Those without the gift of celibacy should not attempt to live as if they had the gift. Paul’s instruction to them is clear. Let them marry. This is a command, in the imperative.

Paul gives extended instructions about the status of widows in the church to the young pastor Timothy.

1 Timothy 5:3 Honor widows who are truly widows. 4 But if a widow has children or grandchildren, let them first learn to show godliness to their own household and to make some return to their parents, for this is pleasing in the sight of God. 5 She who is truly a widow, left all alone, has set her hope on God and continues in supplications and prayers night and day, 6 but she who is self-indulgent is dead even while she lives. 7 Command these things as well, so that they may be without reproach. 8 But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. 9 Let a widow be enrolled if she is not less than sixty years of age, having been the wife of one husband, 10 and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work. 11 But refuse to enroll younger widows, for when their passions draw them away from Christ, they desire to marry 12 and so incur condemnation for having abandoned their former faith. 13 Besides that, they learn to be idlers, going about from house to house, and not only idlers, but also gossips and busybodies, saying what they should not. 14 So I would have younger widows marry, bear children, manage their households, and give the adversary no occasion for slander. 15 For some have already strayed after Satan. 16 If any believing woman has relatives who are widows, let her care for them. Let the church not be burdened, so that it may care for those who are truly widows.

It was the obligation first of the family to care for widows. If they had no family, the church would care for their needs. But Timothy was cautioned against placing younger widows in the care of the church. Instead they were encouraged to marry a believing husband and maintain their independence. He has a whole list of the dangers of enrolling younger widows into church charity programs. One major reason is that they may not have the God-given gift of celibacy. Paul says ‘if they are not exercising self-control, let them marry’.

Better To Marry Than To Burn

1 Corinthians 7:8 To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is good for them to remain single as I am. 9 But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to burn with passion.

He said it is good to remain as they are if they are gifted in that way, but it is better to marry if they are not gifted with celibacy. It is better to marry than to burn. What does Paul mean when he says it is better to marry than to burn? Probably he means that it is better to marry than to be inflamed with passion, so many modern translations add the interpretive phrase ‘with passion’. This would fit well with the first section of this chapter, where marriage is rightfully used as a weapon against Satanic temptation to sexual immorality. Pursue the God-given path to sexual fulfillment in marriage rather than sentencing yourself to a life of temptation and frustration.

Some have understood this burning in a different sense. Two rabbis were walking along a road. (This sounds like the beginning of a good joke, but it is not. It is actually from the Jewish Talmud [TB Qiddusin 81a; cited by Bruce, p.68]) Two rabbis were walking along a road and they see a woman walking ahead of them. Rab says to R. Judah ‘Hurry up and get in front of Gehenna’. Gehenna was a place of idolatry and child sacrifice in the fires outside of Jerusalem. It became a picture of the fires of eternal punishment, often translated ‘hell’ in the Gospels. I think the idea was to put the temptation to lust behind you, a temptation which would send you to hell. Let’s bring this up to date. We often hear an attractive member of the opposite sex referred to as ‘hot’. From now on when you hear ‘hot’ think ‘hot’ as in Gehenna. Paul said that the ‘pornea’, the sexually immoral would not inherit the kingdom of God. It is better to find fulfillment in marriage than to burn with lust that will end up sentencing you to burn in hell. As Jesus said

Matthew 18:9 And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell [Gehenna] of fire.

Practical Advice

Paul is intensely practical in this passage. He doesn’t say everything there is to say about marriage or singleness here. But what he does say is practical. Let’s end with some practical advice.

What if you are single today and thinking ‘I don’t think I have the gift of celibacy’? First, get your priorities straight. Recognize that your body is not meant for sexual immorality, it is meant for the Lord. So glorify God with your body. Take advantage of the freedoms of your present singleness to bring maximum glory to God.

Next, as Paul said at the end of chapter 6 ‘flee sexual immorality’. Smash your I-phone. Tear out your internet connection. Do whatever it takes to flee sexual immorality. Paul promises in chapter 10

1 Corinthians 10:13 No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

Then, if you recognize that you are not gifted for singleness, prepare yourself for marriage. Guys, this might mean you need to grow up. Get a job. Start bathing. Stop playing video games all the time. Stop texting and learn to have a real conversation. Be responsible. Learn to put someone else’s needs and desires ahead of your own. Stop making excuses and start following Jesus with all your energy.

What if you realize today that you have blown it big time? Maybe you are seeing for the first time what God has to say about the seriousness of sin. Maybe you’re realizing that based on what you have done you deserve to be cast straight into the fires of Gehenna. Is it too late for you? Jesus said to the woman caught in the act of adultery ‘Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more’ (Jn.8:11). If you run to Jesus, you can be washed, set apart, declared not guilty because Jesus took the punishment you deserve on himself at the cross. He would love to forgive your sins and make you new and transform your desires. Come to him.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 10, 2013 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 6:12-18; Know When To Run Away!

10/13 1 Corinthians 6:12-18 The Body is For The Lord; Know When To Run Away! Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20131013_1cor6_12-18.mp3

1Cor 6 [SBLGNT]

12 Πάντα μοι ἔξεστιν· ἀλλ’ οὐ πάντα συμφέρει. πάντα μοι ἔξεστιν· ἀλλ’ οὐκ ἐγὼ ἐξουσιασθήσομαι ὑπό τινος. 13 τὰ βρώματα τῇ κοιλίᾳ, καὶ ἡ κοιλία τοῖς βρώμασιν· ὁ δὲ θεὸς καὶ ταύτην καὶ ταῦτα καταργήσει. τὸ δὲ σῶμα οὐ τῇ πορνείᾳ ἀλλὰ τῷ κυρίῳ, καὶ ὁ κύριος τῷ σώματι· 14 ὁ δὲ θεὸς καὶ τὸν κύριον ἤγειρεν καὶ ἡμᾶς ἐξεγερεῖ διὰ τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ. 15 οὐκ οἴδατε ὅτι τὰ σώματα ὑμῶν μέλη Χριστοῦ ἐστιν; ἄρας οὖν τὰ μέλη τοῦ Χριστοῦ ποιήσω πόρνης μέλη; μὴ γένοιτο. 16 ἢ οὐκ οἴδατε ὅτι ὁ κολλώμενος τῇ πόρνῃ ἓν σῶμά ἐστιν; Ἔσονται γάρ, φησίν, οἱ δύο εἰς σάρκα μίαν. 17 ὁ δὲ κολλώμενος τῷ κυρίῳ ἓν πνεῦμά ἐστιν.

1Cor 6 [ESV2011]

1 Corinthians 6:9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

12 “All things are lawful for me,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful for me,” but I will not be dominated by anything. 13 “Food is meant for the stomach and the stomach for food”—and God will destroy both one and the other. The body is not meant for sexual immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. 14 And God raised the Lord and will also raise us up by his power. 15 Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? Shall I then take the members of Christ and make them members of a prostitute? Never! 16 Or do you not know that he who is joined to a prostitute becomes one body with her? For, as it is written, “The two will become one flesh.” 17 But he who is joined to the Lord becomes one spirit with him. 18 Flee from sexual immorality. Every other sin a person commits is outside the body, but the sexually immoral person sins against his own body. 19 Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, 20 for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.

Paul addresses sexual immorality and lawsuits in the church as evidence that this church was not understanding the implications of the gospel and not walking in the way of the cross. We want to be wise, not with worldly human wisdom, but with the wisdom of God, the wisdom of the cross. In this passage, the apostle addresses the issue of Christian liberty, specifically as it applies to human sexuality.

Paul was passionate about Christian liberty. He wrote a letter to the believers in Galatia warning them against defecting from Christ to a different counterfeit gospel, a false gospel of law keeping. He affirms that ‘Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law’ (Gal.3:13). He affirms that it is ‘for freedom that Christ has set us free’ and he exhorts us to ‘stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery’ (Gal.5:1). He affirms that those who are led by the Spirit are not under the law’ (Gal.5:18). In his letter to the Romans he boldly states ‘For we hold that one is justified by faith apart from works of the law’ (Rom.3:28), and he affirms that ‘you are not under law but under grace’ (Rom.6:14). He says that we have ‘died to the law through the body of Christ’ (Rom.7:4) and ‘we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive’ (Rom.7:6).

All Things Are Lawful

There was a slogan going around that attempted to encapsulate the apostle’s teaching on liberty; ‘all things are lawful’. Paul quotes this maxim twice in this verse and twice in 10:23. Whether Paul said this himself or someone else coined the phrase in an attempt to capture the essence of his teaching, this slogan was popular in Corinth. The problem with catch phrases and slogans is that they are open to misinterpretation. And that is the problem in Corinth. In chapter 6, the issue is sexual immorality. In chapter 10 the issue is food sacrificed to idols. ‘All things are lawful’. Apparently this phrase encapsulated their attitude to all things gray and many things black. Paul has just warned them against self-deception. They were in danger of fooling themselves on the most important of all issues. He said in no uncertain terms that those who are sexually immoral, idolaters, adulterers, homosexuals, thieves, greedy, drunkards, revilers, or swindlers will not inherit the kingdom of God. All those things can be forgiven and you can be washed clean through the blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, but those who willfully continue in those kind of lifestyles demonstrate that they have not been transformed by the grace of Jesus.

Not All Things Are Helpful

He starts by giving two qualifying statements to this slogan ‘all things are lawful for me’. First, although all things may be lawful, not all things are helpful or profitable. The question of Christian liberty must not be ‘what can I get away with and not forfeit my salvation?’ or ‘how close to the edge can I get without unwittingly plummeting to my eternal ruin?’

Jesus uses this same word ‘helpful’ or ‘profitable’ in Matthew 5.

Matthew 5:27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Do not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman to lust for her has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 And if your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it from you! For it is better (profitable) for you that one of your members be destroyed than your whole body be thrown into hell. 30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it from you! For it is better (profitable) for you that one of your limbs be destroyed than your whole body go into hell.

Jesus uses it again in Matthew 18.

Matthew 18:6 but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea.

If we are asking ‘what is permissible?’ we are asking the wrong question, and it is evidence of a heart problem. We ought to be asking instead ‘what is best?’ ‘what is the ideal?’ ‘what is the goal?’ Paul sums up this idea in Philippians 4:8.

Philippians 4:8 Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.

In Galatians, Paul holds up for us a higher standard.

Galatians 5:13 For you were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. 14 For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

We are no longer under the law; we are now free to fulfill the law of love.

I Will Not Be Dominated By Anything

1 Corinthians 6:12 “All things are lawful for me,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful for me,” but I will not be dominated by anything.

Paul’s second qualification of this statement is that he will not be brought under the power or authority or control of anything. I am not under law but under grace. I could say that it is within my Christian liberty to smoke or drink or gamble or view porn or overeat or indulge in the latest fashion or gadget or whatever, but what happens when my so-called Christian liberty begins to control me? There is a word play here in the original that is difficult to capture in a translation. Some attempts are ‘all things are in my power, but I will not be overpowered by anything’ (Edwards) or I have ‘liberty to do anything, but I will not let anything take liberties with me’ (Thiselton, p.462). There is a danger that our rights and freedoms and liberties will begin to control us. Paul says in Romans 6

Romans 6:12 Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, to make you obey its passions. 13 Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God as instruments for righteousness. 14 For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace. 15 What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! 16 Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness? 17 But thanks be to God, that you who were once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which you were committed, 18 and, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness.

Many who claim Christian liberty have become slaves to their various ‘freedoms’. Any freedom that allows you to plunge yourself back into slavery is not genuine freedom. True freedom is freedom to do what is best, freedom to be who you were created to be, freedom to love and serve the Lord Jesus.

Food For The Stomach and the Stomach For Food

In verse 13, Paul addresses another slogan that was used to justify a whole lot of things. ‘Food is for the stomach, and the stomach for food.’ This idea is still popular today. When your physical appetite is hungry, you should eat. When your sexual appetite is hungry, you should satisfy it. God made us with appetites and needs, and he meant for those appetites to be satisfied, not frustrated. The implication becomes clear in the rest of the verse. ‘Food is for the stomach and the stomach is for food; sexual pleasure is for the body and the body is for sexual pleasure’.

One difficulty in understanding this passage is what part of these statements are the popular slogans and what are Paul’s rebuttals. There were no quotation marks in the original, so we have to try to understand from the context and content where the quotation ends. Probably the statement ‘and God will destroy both one and the other’ is also part of the slogan. The idea is that food and the stomach, and the body and sexuality are temporary and therefore unimportant. They are part of the lower physical life. In Greek thought there was a division made between body and spirit, material and immaterial. What was done in the body had no effect on the spirit. Those who had achieved a higher plane of spiritual understanding knew that they were free to do whatever they pleased with their bodies, because they believed their bodies would ultimately be destroyed and only their spirit would live on. This is not a biblical idea. Jesus, in his resurrected body, ate food. Jesus spoke with his disciples about eating and drinking at his table in his kingdom (Lk.22:30). Paul combats this thinking by pointing us to the resurrection of the body, a topic he will treat more fully in chapter 15.

1 Corinthians 6:13 “Food is meant for the stomach and the stomach for food”—and God will destroy both one and the other. The body is not meant for sexual immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. 14 And God raised the Lord and will also raise us up by his power.

The Body is for the Lord

The stomach may be designed for food, but it is not meant for gluttony. The body is designed by God for sexual pleasure within the marriage covenant, but it is not intended for sexual immorality. The body has a much higher purpose. Paul gives us an amazing statement here. The body is not for sexual immorality, the body is for the Lord. Our ultimate purpose, our physical design is to bring glory to God. We were made to worship God. We were made to serve him.

Colossians 1:16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him.

Romans 11:36 For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be glory forever. Amen.

We, our physical bodies, were meant for the Lord. We are meant to bring glory to God.

The Lord is for the Body

The second half of this statement is even more amazing. The body is meant for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. As food satisfies the hunger of the stomach, only Jesus can satisfy the deepest longings of who we are.

Psalm 16:11 You make known to me the path of life; in your presence there is fullness of joy; at your right hand are pleasures forevermore.

Psalm 90:14 Satisfy us in the morning with your steadfast love, that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.

The Lord is meant for the body. Only in relationship with Jesus can we find true fulfillment, true satisfaction, true joy. Our bodies were meant for the Lord, and the Lord for our bodies. This raises the value and worth of the physical body, and it points us to our true purpose as physical human beings.

Do You Not Know?

Paul asks two more rhetorical questions ‘do you not know?’ implying that they ought to know these things, and they ought to be drawing the appropriate conclusions from these truths. They are acting as if they are ignorant of these things, so Paul spells it out for them.

1 Corinthians 6:15 Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? Shall I then take the members of Christ and make them members of a prostitute? Never! 16 Or do you not know that he who is joined to a prostitute becomes one body with her? For, as it is written, “The two will become one flesh.” 17 But he who is joined to the Lord becomes one spirit with him.

The first thing we ought to know is that our bodies are members of Christ. As someone who has been transformed by Jesus, we are possessed by him and have become part of his body. Christ now lives in me. To tear away the body parts of Jesus and force them into intimate contact with a prostitute is unthinkable!

He asks a second question: ‘Do you not know that he who is joined to a prostitute becomes one body with her?’ and he defends this from God’s statement in Genesis ‘The two will become one flesh’. This extends beyond prostitution to any immoral sexual relationship, any sexual intimacy outside of the marriage covenant. Sexual intimacy is a powerful force that is meant to create unity and intimacy in the context of lifelong commitment. There is no such thing as casual sex. Sex cannot ever be a temporary one time event. There is a joining, a gluing or cementing together. This is the same word from the Genesis passage translated ‘cleave’ or ‘hold fast to’. There is a spiritual union created through physical intimacy. We were not meant for immorality. Our bodies were meant for the Lord. We were made to be joined to the Lord, we were designed for intimacy with our Creator, to enjoy that inseparable bond of love and union with the only one who can truly fulfill us. What a high privilege! To be joined to the Lord, to become one spirit with him! We get a glimpse into what this means when Paul says:

Galatians 2:20 I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

He loved me. He gave himself for me. He now lives in me. When we realize this, the thought of sexual immorality becomes as repulsive and offensive as it ought to be.

Run Away!

Paul has some very practical advice for us.

1 Corinthians 6:18 Flee from sexual immorality. Every other sin a person commits is outside the body, but the sexually immoral person sins against his own body.

Flee sexual immorality. Flee porn. Run away! Keep running! Make it your habitual continual practice to run away from immorality. In the words of Kenny Rogers ‘You’ve got to know when to walk away and know when to run’, and when there is sexual temptation, that is when to run. Leave you coat, leave your computer, just run. Don’t linger. Don’t delay. Run and don’t look back. Sexual sin is unique. Sexual sin is against your own body in a way that no other sin is. Not that sexual sin is worse than any other sin, but sexual sin has effects and implications that run deeper than any other sin. The body is sacred. What you do with your body affects your soul. It affects your relationship with the Lord. Listen to the wisdom and warning of Proverbs.

Proverbs 5:1 My son, be attentive to my wisdom; incline your ear to my understanding, 2 that you may keep discretion, and your lips may guard knowledge. 3 For the lips of a forbidden woman drip honey, and her speech is smoother than oil, 4 but in the end she is bitter as wormwood, sharp as a two-edged sword. 5 Her feet go down to death; her steps follow the path to Sheol; 6 she does not ponder the path of life; her ways wander, and she does not know it. 7 And now, O sons, listen to me, and do not depart from the words of my mouth. 8 Keep your way far from her, and do not go near the door of her house, 9 lest you give your honor to others and your years to the merciless, 10 lest strangers take their fill of your strength, and your labors go to the house of a foreigner, 11 and at the end of your life you groan, when your flesh and body are consumed, 12 and you say, “How I hated discipline, and my heart despised reproof! 13 I did not listen to the voice of my teachers or incline my ear to my instructors. 14 I am at the brink of utter ruin in the assembled congregation.” 15 Drink water from your own cistern, flowing water from your own well. 16 Should your springs be scattered abroad, streams of water in the streets? 17 Let them be for yourself alone, and not for strangers with you. 18 Let your fountain be blessed, and rejoice in the wife of your youth, 19 a lovely deer, a graceful doe. Let her breasts fill you at all times with delight; be intoxicated always in her love. 20 Why should you be intoxicated, my son, with a forbidden woman and embrace the bosom of an adulteress? 21 For a man’s ways are before the eyes of the LORD, and he ponders all his paths. 22 The iniquities of the wicked ensnare him, and he is held fast in the cords of his sin. 23 He dies for lack of discipline, and because of his great folly he is led astray.

Be wise! Flee sexual immorality! Do not be deceived. The sexually immoral will not inherit the kingdom of God. And such were some of you. But you were washed. You were sanctified. You were justified. You were made for so much more! Your body is meant for the Lord, and the Lord for your body.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

October 13, 2013 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 5:9-13; You Are To Judge Those Inside

09/22 1 Corinthians 5:9-13 You Are To Judge Those Inside; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20130922_1cor5_9-13.mp3

1Cor 5 [SBLGNT]

9 Ἔγραψα ὑμῖν ἐν τῇ ἐπιστολῇ μὴ συναναμίγνυσθαι πόρνοις, 10 οὐ πάντως τοῖς πόρνοις τοῦ κόσμου τούτου ἢ τοῖς πλεονέκταις καὶ ἅρπαξιν ἢ εἰδωλολάτραις, ἐπεὶ ὠφείλετε ἄρα ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου ἐξελθεῖν. 11 νῦν δὲ ἔγραψα ὑμῖν μὴ συναναμίγνυσθαι ἐάν τις ἀδελφὸς ὀνομαζόμενος ᾖ πόρνος ἢ πλεονέκτης ἢ εἰδωλολάτρης ἢ λοίδορος ἢ μέθυσος ἢ ἅρπαξ, τῷ τοιούτῳ μηδὲ συνεσθίειν. 12 τί γάρ μοι τοὺς ἔξω κρίνειν; οὐχὶ τοὺς ἔσω ὑμεῖς κρίνετε, 13 τοὺς δὲ ἔξω ὁ θεὸς κρίνει ; ἐξάρατε τὸν πονηρὸν ἐξ ὑμῶν αὐτῶν.

1Cor 5 [ESV2011]

5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife. 2 And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you. 3 For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing. 4 When you are assembled in the name of the Lord Jesus and my spirit is present, with the power of our Lord Jesus, 5 you are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

6 Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump? 7 Cleanse out the old leaven that you may be a new lump, as you really are unleavened. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed. 8 Let us therefore celebrate the festival, not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

9 I wrote to you in my letter not to associate with sexually immoral people— 10 not at all meaning the sexually immoral of this world, or the greedy and swindlers, or idolaters, since then you would need to go out of the world. 11 But now I am writing to you not to associate with anyone who bears the name of brother if he is guilty of sexual immorality or greed, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or swindler—not even to eat with such a one. 12 For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? 13 God judges those outside. “Purge the evil person from among you.”

Paul is concerned that the church in Corinth is not being shaped by the cross, not living lives that are in step with the gospel. Their conduct does not match what they believe. Because of Jesus, they have been made new. They have been cleansed by the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross. All their sins are washed away. Paul is urging them now to be who they are in Christ. And this extends to the corporate level. Because they are a community of believers who are united to one another through faith in Jesus Christ, the sin of one affects the health of the whole. He has used the illustration of old leaven introduced into a new unleavened batch of dough. As a community of followers of Jesus, they are expected to hold one another accountable to standards appropriate for those who claim to be following Jesus.

The Previous Letter

In verses 9-13, Paul is clearing up a misinterpretation of a previous letter he had written. He says “I wrote to you in my letter.” The letter we are studying today is known as 1 Corinthians. From this statement we conclude that Paul had written a previous letter to the church in Corinth that we don’t have. That might freak some people out and send them off on rabbit trails chasing ‘lost’ apostolic writings and conspiracy theories about church councils throwing out perfectly good books because they didn’t like what they said. That simply does not match the facts of history, or the character of the documents we have in our bibles. If someone was trying to grasp power and manipulate the writings to their own advantage, they certainly didn’t do a very good job. The books that were rejected by the early church councils were rejected because they were false writings (pseudapigrapha), teaching things contrary to the rest of Scripture, written under the false name of someone important (like an apostle) in an attempt to gain credibility. Those documents are not lost; they are available to read today so you can judge for yourself.

It is clear from statements like this one that we do not possess every apostolic writing. Paul wrote an earlier letter to the church in Corinth that was not preserved. God in his sovereignty could have preserved it for us, but for whatever reason, he did not. We can be confident that we have everything that God intended us to have, and if you care to study the manuscript evidence, you will see that these writings have been meticulously preserved for us through scores of copies and multiple independent witnesses.

Misunderstood

Not everything that the apostles wrote are easy to understand. The apostle Peter writes about Paul.

2 Peter 3:15 …just as our beloved brother Paul also wrote to you according to the wisdom given him, 16 as he does in all his letters when he speaks in them of these matters. There are some things in them that are hard to understand, which the ignorant and unstable twist to their own destruction, as they do the other Scriptures.

Not even what an apostle wrote was free from being misinterpreted by its original readers. Some people scour the Scriptures in search of anything they can use to defend their own ideas. The same is true today. If I send you an e-mail, you might read it with a preconceived idea and take what I wrote to mean something completely different than what I intended. When we read the bible, our goal is to hear the author’s intent. We want to be careful to lay aside our preconceived ideas and allow the author to explain for us what he means by what he says. That’s why we often look at many other biblical passages to make sure we are on the right track in how we are understanding a verse or passage. Here Paul spells out what he didn’t mean and what he did mean so there is no question.

Apparently the previous letter did not accomplish its intended goal. Maybe Paul wrote more generally, not naming the specific sins in the body, or maybe the situation with the incestuous man was new information he received after he wrote the first letter. Whatever the case, in this letter, Paul refers to what he had written, and clarifies what he did not mean and what he did mean.

The Previous Statement

First, he reiterates what he had written; ‘not to associate with sexually immoral people’. We don’t know if this is a direct quote from his letter or a summary of the letter, or maybe the entire contents of a quick note. In the original this is a three word statement. We could translate it literally ‘not to mix it up together with porno’s’. This ‘mix up together’ is an interesting word especially in light of his illustration about dough and old leaven. They are not to blend together with sex addicts, pornographers, those who are sexually unrestrained.

The Misunderstanding

Paul then states their misunderstanding of his statement.

1 Corinthians 5:9 I wrote to you in my letter not to associate with sexually immoral people— 10 not at all meaning the sexually immoral of this world, or the greedy and swindlers, or idolaters, since then you would need to go out of the world.

They thought he meant that they should not associate with the sexually immoral of this world. They thought that somehow they were to withdraw from the world in which they lived and have no contact with any unbelievers ever. Slaves who served unbelieving masters would have to run away. Employees who worked for unbelievers would have to quit their jobs. Employers who employed an unbelieving work force would have to fire them. When they went to the market they could only buy food from other believers. They could not go to any social gatherings that would include unbelievers. They would have to withdraw into a closed Christian commune and have no interaction with the outside world. Paul says ‘that is not at all what I meant.’ That is simply impossible. In order to do that, he says, you would have to leave the planet, you would have to die and go to heaven. He doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t live next door to a pagan or buy groceries from a pagan or pay your water bill to a pagan or eat in a restaurant where other pagans eat. Not at all.

When Jesus prayed for his followers before his crucifixion, he prayed;

John 17:14 I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 15 I do not ask that you take them out of the world, but that you keep them from the evil one. 16 They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 17 Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. 18 As you sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world.

Followers of Jesus must be distinct from the world, but they are sent into the world. Salt cannot have its preserving effect unless it comes in contact with the meat. We are to be in the world but not of the world. We are to be the salt of the earth.

The Correct Understanding

Having made it clear that he did not mean total withdrawal from sinful society, he now spells out what he did mean by what he had said.

11 But now I am writing to you not to associate with anyone who bears the name of brother if he is guilty of sexual immorality or greed, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or swindler—not even to eat with such a one.

There must be a clear distinction between the church and the world. Anyone who bears the name ‘brother’, anyone who claims to be a brother or sister in Christ must be held to a completely different standard. If you claim to be a follower of Jesus, then you are claiming to represent Jesus in everything you say and do and think and feel. Your attitudes and actions should come into line with what Jesus is like.

None of us are perfect. Where we see that we are out of step with Jesus, we should confess that as sin and cry out to Jesus to change us by the power of the Holy Spirit who lives in us.

The problem Paul is addressing in the church in Corinth is not that they have interaction with sinners in the world. The problem is that they have someone who claims to be a brother who is openly involved in immorality and is not turning away from it. Paul says ‘stop acting like everything is all right!’ This person claims to be a brother, but he is not acting like a brother, so you should stop treating him as a brother. “Let him who has done this be removed from among you.” “Hand such a one over to Satan.” “Cleanse out the old leaven.” “Purge the evil from among you.” Do not mix it up together with anyone who bears the name ‘brother’ if he is guilty of these things. Don’t even eat with such a one.

Does this mean that if anyone in the church has a history or has ever slipped up that we should cut them off and refuse to associate with them? This would be also be a misapplication of this passage. Later in this letter, Paul will say:

1 Corinthians 6:9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

Many of those in this church had a past. But they were made new. They no longer are what they once were. They have been transformed by the gospel. But they should not pretend to still be what they once were. By the grace of God you are no longer what you once were. Be who you are in Christ!

But what if someone slips up?

Galatians 6:1 Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness. Keep watch on yourself, lest you too be tempted.

Not condemnation or alienation but restoration in a spirit of gentleness and humility for those of us who slip up. Jude says:

Jude 1:22 And have mercy on those who doubt; 23 save others by snatching them out of the fire; to others show mercy with fear, hating even the garment stained by the flesh.

Rescue with mercy and fear. But what about those who don’t want to be rescued? What about those who persist in sin and claim to be brothers?

Titus 3:9 But avoid foolish controversies, genealogies, dissensions, and quarrels about the law, for they are unprofitable and worthless. 10 As for a person who stirs up division, after warning him once and then twice, have nothing more to do with him, 11 knowing that such a person is warped and sinful; he is self-condemned.

So Paul tells Titus to have nothing to do with a divisive person after two warnings.

2 Thessalonians 3:6 Now we command you, brothers, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is walking in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us. …14 If anyone does not obey what we say in this letter, take note of that person, and have nothing to do with him, that he may be ashamed. 15 Do not regard him as an enemy, but warn him as a brother.

Paul tells the Thessalonians to warn and then to keep away from and have nothing to do with a brother who refuses to work.

The Wider Application

Notice that this separation is not exclusively for the sexually immoral. In Titus and Thessalonians it extends to divisiveness and idleness. Here in 1 Corinthians 5, Paul widens the scope as well. In verse 10 he extends this to the greedy, swindlers, and idolaters; in verse 11 he adds revilers and drunkards.

11 But now I am writing to you not to associate with anyone who bears the name of brother if he is guilty of sexual immorality or greed, or is an idolater, reviler, drunkard, or swindler—not even to eat with such a one.

For someone who claims to be a follower of Jesus, who is led by the Holy Spirit, who has been adopted into the family of God, to be persistently divisive, irresponsible, immoral, possessed by a desire to get more, holding other things as more important than God, abusing others in word or deed, given to alcohol, manipulating situations to his own advantage, these things are totally out of place. These things are not characteristic of someone who has a relationship with Jesus.

Those who are caught in any transgression should be confronted and restored in a spirit of gentleness with humility. Those who are willfully sinning and refuse to repent, we are not to associate with them; not even to eat with them. They are no longer to be treated as if they were fellow believers; they are to be treated as an unbeliever so that they will not continue under false assurance thinking they have a relationship with Jesus when in reality they may not.

Judging Insiders

Paul gives the principle behind treating so-called brothers differently than the world.

12 For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? 13 God judges those outside. “Purge the evil person from among you.”

What have I to do with judging outsiders? It is not our place to judge them. God judges those outside. The church is responsible for judging those inside the church. So often we get this backward. We want to be the moral police of the world, letting everyone know clearly and loudly what we are against, demanding that the world adopt Christian morals and values, while we turn a blind eye to our own sins like greed and pride and divisiveness.

Paul is warning us to beware of a judgmental attitude toward those outside the church. We should not expect the unbelieving world to adhere to Christian morals or values. We should not be surprised or offended when pagans live like pagans. It should come as no shock that the Christ rejecting world also rejects Christ’s values.

Abortion is wrong. All sexual activity outside the relationship between a man and his wife is wrong. Pornography is wrong. The insatiable desire in our culture for more and more and more is wrong. These are all sins with victims who get injured or destroyed. Out of our love for a humanity created in the image of God, we should stand against what is wrong and do what we can to bring healing and hope to this broken world. But we must remember that the only thing that can truly ever fix what is broken in us is the gospel. We all are sinners. Jesus died for our sins to forgive us and make us new. To put a band-aid on the symptom while ignoring the cancer inside is cruel. To tell someone to stop doing wrong when they have a heart that is twisted and sick with sin is hopeless. We have been given the cure! We must not condemn those with the disease because they are showing symptoms.

If we as the church are responsible for judging those inside, we should be passionate about the purity of the church. We should solicit, seek out, and welcome judgment from our brothers and sisters in Christ out of our desire to be pleasing to Christ.

For the glory of God, for the sake of the reputation of Christ among unbelievers, for the sake of the advance of the gospel, for the sake of the purity of the church Christ’s bride, for the protection of weaker believers; because of the great price paid by Jesus to save us from our sin, for the sake of those who think they are right with God but are not; for the sake of their final salvation, we are to judge those inside the church; “Purge the evil one from among you”

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

September 25, 2013 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 5:1-5; Sexual Immorality in the Church

09/08 I Corinthians 5:1-5 Sexual Immorality in the Church; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20130908_1cor5_1-5.mp3

1Cor 4-5 [ESV2011]

18 Some are arrogant, as though I were not coming to you. 19 But I will come to you soon, if the Lord wills, and I will find out not the talk of these arrogant people but their power. 20 For the kingdom of God does not consist in talk but in power. 21 What do you wish? Shall I come to you with a rod, or with love in a spirit of gentleness?

5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife. 2 And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you. 3 For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing. 4 When you are assembled in the name of the Lord Jesus and my spirit is present, with the power of our Lord Jesus, 5 you are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

Paul has brought the believers in Corinth back to the cross. Central to all of Christian life is the gospel of Jesus Christ and him crucified. This is a message that creates humility, because we are all so bad that the Son of God had to die in our place to pay the debt that we owe, and yet we are so loved that he gladly laid down his life in our place. There is no room in the life of the follower of Jesus for boasting or pride. And yet this had crept in to the church in Corinth. They thought they were wise, they thought they were spiritual, they thought they were powerful, they though they were advanced, they thought they had arrived. Paul has laid out the gospel again for them to remind them that boasting is totally inappropriate for a beggar who has received a gift. He has held up himself as an example to follow, an example characterized by persecution, suffering, dishonor, and a lack of basic needs. He warns them, that, as their father, he intends to return, and if necessary he will come with a rod of discipline to drive the foolishness out of the hearts of his children.

In this passage, he brings forward the first major piece of evidence to show that this church really does not have anything to boast about.

1 Corinthians 5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife. 2 And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you. 3 For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing. 4 When you are assembled in the name of the Lord Jesus and my spirit is present, with the power of our Lord Jesus, 5 you are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

In this passage the apostle teaches us much about the responsibilities and expectations on the local church.

Sexual Immorality in the Church

Paul expresses his shock and outrage at what was going on in the church in Corinth.

1 Corinthians 5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife.

Sexual immorality of any kind is not appropriate in the church of God. God is very clear in his word that there is one appropriate place for sexual enjoyment, and that is in the context of marriage between one man and his one wife. Any sexual experience or experimentation outside of that exclusive relationship is a violation of God’s command.

This is not because God is a lonely deprived grump who wants to spoil our fun. God invented sex and pleasure and intimacy and beauty and joy. God designed the human body, he created male and female, and he placed them in an exotic garden without clothes, and commanded them to be fruitful and multiply. That was his idea. Sexual intimacy was designed to bring glory to God as we enjoy God’s good gift and give him thanks for it (Heb.13:4). Sexual intimacy is so powerful and so sacred that misusing it will spoil it, and will lessen our joy in it. Jesus said that

John 10:10 The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.

And this applies to all of life, including our sexuality. Satan tempts and twists and distorts and destroys what God meant for our abundant joy. Jesus came to restore us, every part of us, to what we were designed for. Jesus came to reclaim the ground the enemy had stolen. Jesus said about the woman of the city known to be a sinner, who washed his feet with her tears, ‘your sins are forgiven …your faith has saved you; go in peace’ (Lk.7:47-50). To the woman at the well, who had five husbands and was living with someone who was not her husband, Jesus offered the gift of living water (Jn.4:10-18). Jesus said to the woman caught in the act of adultery and brought out for public execution, ‘neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more’ (Jn.8:11). Jesus came to heal what is sick and restore what is broken and give life to what is dead.

In Galatians 5, Paul contrasts the fruit of the Spirit with the works of the flesh. A follower of Jesus, who has experienced the new birth, in whom the Spirit of God now lives, should be characterized by ‘love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control’; not by ‘sexual immorality, impurity, sensuality, idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, fits of anger, rivalries, dissensions, divisions, envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these’ (Gal.5:19-26). Paul says in Ephesians 5

Ephesians 5:3 But sexual immorality and all impurity or covetousness must not even be named among you, as is proper among saints. 4 Let there be no filthiness nor foolish talk nor crude joking, which are out of place, but instead let there be thanksgiving.

Followers of Jesus must be different than the rest of the world in every area of life.

A Hindrance to the Gospel

Paul is outraged, because the Corinthian church was tolerating a form of sexual perversion that was even offensive to the morally lax Greek culture in which they lived.

1 Corinthians 5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife.

The word translated ‘pagans’ is the word for Gentiles, which is predominantly who made up the church in Corinth. But Paul considers them Gentiles no longer. They are the church of God, a new people. And they ought to be different. Instead, their standards of morality seem to be lower than the unbelieving world around them. Apparently, a man in their fellowship married his step-mother. This is explicitly condemned in the Old Testament (Lev.18:8; Deut.27:20), and it was condemned by Greek culture. At this time, Christianity was looked on with suspicion, and rumors circulated about what these followers of Jesus did when they met together. It was imagined that they practiced cannibalism (because they were said to eat the body and blood of their Lord), and that they practiced incest (because married couples would refer to each other as brother and sister) [Minucius Felix, Octavius, in The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol. 4, pp. 177-178]. The fact that an incestuous relationship was actually going on would add substance to the suspicions of unbelievers and give them legitimate grounds for rejecting their message. The fact that rumors were circulating was inevitable, but for believers to conduct themselves in a way that undermined the gospel was unthinkable. The message of the cross is foolishness to unbelievers, but now the moral misconduct of those who claimed to follow Jesus offended people in their community. This would be an unacceptable hindrance to the advance of the gospel.

Pride in the Face of Sin

2 And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you.

In light of this sin, the attitude of the Corinthians was totally unjustified. They were puffed up, arrogant, boasting. It could be that they were flaunting this situation as an example of their new found Christian liberty. Some have suggested because ‘in Christ the old has passed away and all things have become new’ (2Cor.5:17), they thought that the person who was your step-mom is no longer your step-mom and is now fair game for pursuit in marriage. Because Paul doesn’t address any flawed theology underlying their behavior, it is more likely that this was simply a situation that the church knew about but neglected to deal with. They were boasting about their advanced spirituality and wisdom, while turning a blind eye to this major blemish in the mirror. Possibly the man was a wealthy donor to the church, and addressing his sin would jeopardize the community.

Whatever the situation, their response was inappropriate. The needed response was clear. Mourning, grief, penitent sorrow would be suitable to the situation. It is important to note that Paul is not rebuking the man who sinned. Neither is he rebuking the leadership of the church for not dealing with the situation. He is rebuking the church as a whole for not responding appropriately to the sin of one of their members. The sin of the individual affects the rest of the body. It was the responsibility of the church body to respond. There is a corporate identity and responsibility of the people of God. In chapter 3, he reminded the entire church of their corporate identity.

1 Corinthians 3:16 Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? 17 If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For God’s temple is holy, and you are that temple.

When the ten spies gave a bad report of the promised land to the children of Israel, they all wandered in the desert for 40 years, including Joshua and Caleb (Num.13-14). When Achan sinned and took for himself the items from Jericho which were devoted to destruction, the armies of Israel were defeated in battle (Josh.7). The sin of the individual brought punishment from the Lord on the community. Daniel is a positive example. Daniel was taken captive to Babylon because God had handed Jerusalem over to Nebuchadnezzar due to the persistent sin of the Israelites. No sin of Daniel is recorded in the Bible. In fact, when his enemies were seeking something against him, the only fault they could find was that he scrupulously followed his God. But listen to how Daniel prays in chapter 9

Daniel 9:3 Then I turned my face to the Lord God, seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy with fasting and sackcloth and ashes. 4 I prayed to the LORD my God and made confession, saying, “O Lord, … 5 we have sinned and done wrong and acted wickedly and rebelled, turning aside from your commandments and rules. 6 We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name… 8 To us, O LORD, belongs open shame, …because we have sinned against you. 9 …for we have rebelled against him 10 and have not obeyed the voice of the LORD our God by walking in his laws, …11 …we have sinned against him. 14 …we have not obeyed his voice. 15 …we have sinned, we have done wickedly. 17 Now therefore, O our God, listen to the prayer of your servant and to his pleas for mercy, and for your own sake, O Lord, make your face to shine upon your sanctuary, which is desolate. 18 O my God, incline your ear and hear. Open your eyes and see our desolations, and the city that is called by your name. For we do not present our pleas before you because of our righteousness, but because of your great mercy. 19 O Lord, hear; O Lord, forgive. O Lord, pay attention and act. Delay not, for your own sake, O my God, because your city and your people are called by your name.”

There is no boasting here. There is no ‘God I thank you that I am not like other men’ (Lk.18:11). Daniel owned the sins of his people. He grieved and mourned and confessed them as his own. Paul is demanding that church discipline be carried out on the immoral man, but church discipline must be done with the heart of Daniel. There is no room for discipline to be done with a proud heart. There must be broken-hearted humility and sympathetic grieving. We are one body, each individually members of one another, and in the exercise of discipline we should feel as though we were cutting off our own hand due to gangrene.

Let The One Be Removed From Among You

1 Corinthians 5:1 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife. 2 And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you. 3 For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing. 4 When you are assembled in the name of the Lord Jesus and my spirit is present, with the power of our Lord Jesus, 5 you are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

Although the exercise of discipline must be done with humility and grief, it must be done. And it must be done immediately. When this letter was delivered to the church, the church would be gathered to hear it read. Paul is demanding immediate action. ‘Let him who has done this be removed from among you’. Stop reading and take action! The reputation of the gospel and the purity of Christ’s church is at stake. The Corinthian church should have responded as soon as they knew about the situation. Paul responded as soon as he heard. He has already pronounced judgment. He wasn’t physically present. He didn’t know all the details. He hadn’t heard the excuses. He hadn’t heard both sides of the story. Sin is sin, and some issues are black and white. He didn’t need to come to town and conduct a thorough investigation. There was no explaining to be done. His authority was present in spirit, through his letter. But he was not pulling his apostle card and performing a long-distance excommunication. He was calling for the local church to take action. ‘When you are assembled … you are to deliver this man to Satan.’

Deliver This One To Satan

That sounds harsh. Deliver this one to Satan? In Ephesus, there were some who were teaching different doctrine, wandering off into vain discussion and speculation. Paul charges Timothy to

1 Timothy 1:18 …wage the good warfare, 19 holding faith and a good conscience. By rejecting this, some have made shipwreck of their faith, 20 among whom are Hymenaeus and Alexander, whom I have handed over to Satan that they may learn not to blaspheme.

This is strong language. According to Colossians 1, God has

Colossians 1:13 He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.

Paul placed these two false teachers back into the domain of Satan to be taught not to blaspheme. Paul is calling for the church in Corinth to transfer the immoral brother to Satan for the destruction of the flesh. They were to put him out of the church. The destruction of the flesh could mean that his physical body would be destroyed, or it could mean that his fleshly desires and inclinations would be destroyed. Whether by bodily affliction or otherwise, the end goal is that his spirit would be saved in the day of the Lord.

Paul is confident that God can use even the enemy of our souls to bring about our ultimate good. Paul was personally experiencing this in his own life. He writes in 2 Corinthians:

2 Corinthians 12:7 So to keep me from becoming conceited because of the surpassing greatness of the revelations, a thorn was given me in the flesh, a messenger of Satan to harass me, to keep me from becoming conceited.

In God’s infinite wisdom, Paul was given a messenger of Satan to harass him, to keep him from becoming conceited. The goal of this demonic emissary was certainly not Paul’s spiritual good; he was seeking to steal and kill and destroy, but our sovereign God can employ even the ruthless enemy to unwittingly accomplish his wise purposes. That is the goal here, to see this immoral sinner saved on judgment day.

The Heart and Process of Discipline

Paul is following both the heart and the process of Jesus’ instructions to his disciples on the matter of church discipline found in Matthew 18. Jesus prefaces his instructions with a story about sheep.

Matthew 18:12 What do you think? If a man has a hundred sheep, and one of them has gone astray, does he not leave the ninety-nine on the mountains and go in search of the one that went astray? 13 And if he finds it, truly, I say to you, he rejoices over it more than over the ninety-nine that never went astray. 14 So it is not the will of my Father who is in heaven that one of these little ones should perish.

The heart of the Father is going after and restoring the sheep that goes astray. That is the heart behind the process. Then Jesus gives the process:

Matthew 18:15 “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained your brother. 16 But if he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. 17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector.

In the case in Corinth, the man had not sinned against an individual. He had sinned publicly, and brought disgrace on the entire church. They were to treat him as an outsider. Although he claimed to be a believer, he was not acting like a believer, so they were to stop treating him as a believer. They were to assume that he needed to repent and believe the gospel. They were to treat him like a Gentile or a tax collector. And keep in mind how Jesus treated Gentiles and tax collectors. He extended to them the good news and invited them to trust him for rescue from their sin.

Matthew 18:18 Truly, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. 19 Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. 20 For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.”

When the church gathers to go after stray sheep with the attitude and heart of Jesus, Jesus promises to be present with them. His power and authority are at work. Paul applies this to the situation in Corinth. In the name of the Lord Jesus they are to pronounce judgment. When the church is gathered they are to deliver this one to Satan with the power of the Lord Jesus.

Peter responded to this teaching of Jesus with a question.

Matthew 18:21 Then Peter came up and said to him, “Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?” 22 Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times.

How many times can the sheep go astray before we just shoot them down? Jesus illustrated with a story. He told of a king who wished to settle accounts and a slave who owed an enormous debt he could not pay. His master released him and forgave him the debt. This servant then went and found a fellow servant who owed him a trivial amount and demanded payment and refused to show mercy. When approaching this sensitive issue of confronting a brother in sin, we must not be like that servant. We must keep in front of us a keen awareness of how great a debt we have been forgiven by God. We must be passionate for the honor of Christ and the purity of his church, and we must be eager to extend his forgiveness to our fellow servants. We must plead and ache and long for restoration. 

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

September 8, 2013 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment