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Leviticus 2; The Grain Offering

04/24 Leviticus 2; The Grain Offering; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20160424_leviticus-2.mp3

We are in Leviticus 2, the second of the 5 offerings. The first three offerings, the burnt offering, the grain offering, and the peace offering, are voluntary offerings, and they are each said to be “a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD”. The last two, the sin and the guilt offering, are required to be offered when anyone sins. The whole burnt offering, we saw, was a foundational offering, dealing not with specific sins, but with our sinful nature. It was a costly offering, and it was a completely Godward offering, the entire animal (except for the hide) going up in smoke as a pleasing aroma to the LORD.

Jesus said to the religious leaders in John 5

John 5:39 You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.

All these offerings together, the whole sacrificial system, points us to Jesus, and his once-for-all sacrifice for us.

Tribute

This second offering is unique among the offerings, in that it is not a bloody offering. No animal is involved. It is a grain offering. This offering is called in Hebrew a ‘Minhah’, simply a gift. This kind of gift often expresses gratitude, reverence, homage, or allegiance. This was often a tribute offering. In Genesis 32, when Jacob was returning to his homeland and his brother Esau, from whom he had stolen both birthright and blessing, who had wanted to kill him, was coming out to meet him with 400 men, he sent a ‘minhah’ ahead of him

Genesis 32:20 …For he thought, “I may appease him with the present that goes ahead of me, and afterward I shall see his face. Perhaps he will accept me.”

This was a gift intended to appease, to gain acceptance. In Genesis 43, when Jacob reluctantly agreed to send his youngest son to the leader of Egypt who had interrogated his other sons and was holding one prisoner,

Genesis 43:11 Then their father Israel said to them, “If it must be so, then do this: take some of the choice fruits of the land in your bags, and carry a present down to the man, a little balm and a little honey, gum, myrrh, pistachio nuts, and almonds. …14 May God Almighty grant you mercy before the man, and may he send back your other brother and Benjamin.

This was a gift to a powerful leader intended to gain a favorable outcome.

When we come to the time of the Judges, we see Israel subservient to other nations, and in Judges 3 a ‘minhah’ is sent from Israel to the king of Moab. In 2 Samuel 8, when David conquered the Moabites, they became David’s servants and brought him ‘minhah’.

It was common for a defeated king to enter into a treaty with the conquering king where he would bring a regular gift of grain or produce to express loyalty, allegiance, and fidelity to the king, and to acknowledge his debt to the king for their very life and existence. We might think of it as a sort of tax; in exchange for peace and security, they offer a percentage of their income to the king who rules over them. This is a good way to think of this offering, but this grain offering is not mandatory, it is voluntary.

Leviticus 2:1 “When anyone brings a grain offering as an offering to the LORD, his offering shall be of fine flour. He shall pour oil on it and put frankincense on it 2 and bring it to Aaron’s sons the priests. And he shall take from it a handful of the fine flour and oil, with all of its frankincense, and the priest shall burn this as its memorial portion on the altar, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD. 3 But the rest of the grain offering shall be for Aaron and his sons; it is a most holy part of the LORD’s food offerings.

This was a tribute to the conquering King. This was a gift to express loyalty, allegiance, faithfulness to the King. This was a recognition that we owe our very life and existence to the King. God has conquered our enemies, he has broken our own rebellion and resistance, he rules over us with peace and justice. God owns all, but he allows us to keep a portion of what we produce for our own needs. God demands our allegiance. Yet this offering is voluntary. It is a way to freely express our loyalty to our King.

How and How Much?

There were different ways that were acceptable to make this offering. All used fine flour, the best of the best, the choicest of the grain, consistently and carefully ground very fine. The fine flour could be brought raw, as flour. Verses 1-3 give instructions for an uncooked grain offering. The fine flour could be prepared as bread. Verses 4-10 give instructions for three categories of cooked grain offerings; verse 4 says “When you bring a grain offering baked in the oven as an offering” it can be brought as loaves or wafers. Verse 5 says “And if your offering is a grain offering baked on a griddle”; verse 7 says “And if your offering is a grain offering cooked in a pan.” There is no requirement given of what kind of grain offering to bring when. There is freedom for the preference of the worshiper, and for the means of preparation available to the worshiper.

Notice also, no quantity is specified. Should I bring a quart? A bushel? A truckload? Two loaves? Ten? A thousand? Bring as much as you wish. Jesus said:

Luke 6:38 give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.”

As Paul says in 2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians 9:6 The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully. 7 Each one must give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

I know this can be frustrating for some. How much should I give? Am I giving enough? How much do most people give? Is it still ten percent? Gross or net? I want to know where I stand. You are not under compulsion. You are to give freely, cheerfully, liberally. When we recognize how much, how very very much we owe to God, how much we have been freely graciously given, giving back to him becomes not an obligation or a debt but a delight.

Where Does It Go?

But where does my gift go? It is brought to the priests, and they offer a handful of it as a memorial portion to be burned on the altar as a pleasing aroma to the Lord. The remainder belongs to the priests. This was God’s way of providing for the needs of the priests. It is called most holy, or literally ‘a holy of holies’, which meant that it was set apart, and only for the priests to be eaten only by them, only in a holy place. Your offering is given to God, and God in turn uses that offering to care for those who are in his service. Paul applies this principle to Christian workers in 1 Corinthians 9.

1 Corinthians 9:13 Do you not know that those who are employed in the temple service get their food from the temple, and those who serve at the altar share in the sacrificial offerings? 14 In the same way, the Lord commanded that those who proclaim the gospel should get their living by the gospel.

He says in 1 Timothy 5:

1 Timothy 5:17 Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching. 18 For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle an ox when it treads out the grain,” and, “The laborer deserves his wages.”

It is quite flattering, by the way, to be likened to an ox treading grain.

What to Bring and What to Leave Out

Although there was freedom in the quantity and method of preparation, there is also very specific instructions on what is to be brought and what must be left out. As we said, this was a grain offering, and it was to be the best of the best, fine flour. Regardless of the preparation, it was always to be offered with oil, and it was always to include frankincense. Never was it to include leaven of any kind, or honey, and it was always to include salt.

Oil in the Scripture is symbolic of the Holy Spirit, and joy. This is to be a Spirit filled offering, not a fleshly offering. It is to be a joyful offering, not a reluctant offering.

Frankincense is an aromatic resin. It was an ingredient of the incense that was to be burned on the altar of incense in the holy place every morning and every evening. No incense for common use was to be made like it. It was set apart for God. All the frankincense on the grain offering was set apart to God. The portion of the grain offering that was burnt on the altar of burnt offering included all the frankincense. It was wholly set apart and devoted to God. Frankincense, you will remember was among the gifts the Magi brought to honor the child Jesus. Frankincense was symbolic of holiness, total Godward devotion.

In chapter 5, we will see that for the sin offering, no oil or frankincense is to be included. A sin offering was not a joyous occasion, sin had been committed, and an offering had to be made to deal with the consequences of sin.

Never was the grain offering to include leaven or honey. In Matthew 16 Jesus warns his disciples to watch out for the leaven of the teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees, and Herod, which he says in Luke 12 is hypocrisy, to appear different than you are.

In Matthew 13, Jesus:

Matthew 13:33 He told them another parable. “The kingdom of heaven is like leaven that a woman took and hid in three measures of flour, till it was all leavened.”

This is in the context of parables about weeds sown by an enemy among good seed that is then allowed to grow together until the harvest, about a mustard seed that grows so large it even provides a nesting place for the evil birds who snatch away gospel seeds, and a net in the sea that gathered fish of every kind, to be sorted in the end good from bad.

Leaven is what we would think of as a sourdough start, a piece of the old dough that contains microorganisms that eat the sugars and convert them into bubbly gasses which puff up the bread. Leaven is that which inflates or puffs up, it is pervasive and affects all it touches. Honey refers not only to honey from bees, but to any sweet nectar, like that from fruits. This too can have a leavening effect. Paul says in 1 Corinthians 5:

1 Corinthians 5:6 Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump? 7 Cleanse out the old leaven that you may be a new lump, as you really are unleavened. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed. 8 Let us therefore celebrate the festival, not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

Leaven is boasting, malice, evil, in contrast to sincerity and truth. No leaven is ever to be burnt on the altar. Verse 12 clarifies, because the offering of firstfruits in Leviticus 23 allows leaven. Leaven is allowed in that offering, but the leavened bread is never to be burned on the altar.

Salt is a required part of all grain offerings. Three times in three different ways in verse 13, salt is emphatically not to be left out of the offerings. Salt has the opposite effect of leaven, actually counteracting leavening influences, stopping the fermentation process and acting as a preservative. Salt was also used in judgment, placed in the ground it would prevent anything from growing. It is called ‘the salt of the covenant with your God’. Salt pointed to the permanent, lasting, eternal character of the covenant.

In Matthew 5:13, Jesus calls his followers ‘the salt of the earth’. In Mark 9, in the context of warning against the dangers of sin and encouraging us to take drastic action against sin in our lives, he says

Mark 9:49 For everyone will be salted with fire. 50 Salt is good, but if the salt has lost its saltiness, how will you make it salty again? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”

We are told in Colossians 4:

Colossians 4:6 Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person.

All our conversations are to have a preserving, not a corrupting effect. All our conversations are to be gracious.

The Work of Our Hands

So what is the grain offering? The grain offering is the work of our hands. The soil is worked, grain is planted, watered, harvested, threshed, ground fine, cooked or prepared in various ways, presented. In this we acknowledge that God has rights over all, that all that we have is only that which he first gave to us.

Jesus in the Grain Offering

But is there more here? How does this offering point us to Jesus? This is not a bloody offering; it is a bread offering. In John 6, Jesus said:

John 6:48 I am the bread of life.

Jesus said:

John 6:32 …my Father gives you the true bread from heaven. 33 For the bread of God is he who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”

Some have seen in the grain offering a picture of Jesus in his humanity. Jesus humbled himself. Jesus in his humanity is perfectly humble. There is no trace of leaven of pride or hypocrisy, no trace of malice or evil. Jesus is full of grace and truth. Everything he said was seasoned with salt. His whole life was a pleasing aroma to his Father. It is interesting to note that in verse 4, it is to be loaves mixed with oil or wafers smeared with oil. Oil is to be mixed in with the grain to form the dough. Jesus’ human body was prepared for him by the Holy Spirit. But at Jesus’ baptism, the Holy Spirit came to rest on him. Jesus said:

Luke 4:18 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed,

Jesus was anointed by the Holy Spirit for ministry. The word for ‘smear’ is ‘mashak’, literally ‘anointed’; the verb from which we get ‘messiah’. Jesus was tested by the devil, as if in an oven, and he refused to do anything to please himself. In John 6, where he claimed to be bread from heaven he said:

John 6:38 For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me.

Jesus, as the perfect man, submitted himself in perfect obedience in all things to the will of his Father. And all his works were perfectly pleasing to the Father. “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased” (Mt.3:17; 17:5). Where Adam, when tested, brought sin and corruption into this world, Jesus perfectly obeyed in all things.

Hebrews 4:15 For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.

But why, in verse 6 is the grain offering to be broken in pieces? Some suggest this would allow the bread to burn better in the fire. Jesus, on the night he was betrayed,

Luke 22:19 And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”

The grain offering that is burned on the altar is called a ‘memorial’, literally a reminder or a remembrance offering. The grain offering was a reminder that God is the provider of all, and it was an offering to remind God to be faithful to his covenants and treat the worshiper with grace. Breaking bread was a normal daily activity that ministered to both physical and social needs within the context of a meal. May we come to know him more fully in the breaking of the bread (Lk.24:35).

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

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April 27, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Matthew 5; God Glorified in a Life Transformed by the Gospel (part 2)

Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20130113_god-glorified-in-transformation.mp3

01/13 God Glorified in a Life Transformed by the Gospel Part 2 (Matthew 5) 

We were created to bring glory to God. We have been asking the question ‘how’ do we bring glory to God; and ‘what’ does a God-glorifying life look like? Jesus said:

John 15:8 By this my Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit and so prove to be my disciples.

Jesus points us to bearing fruit as the way we bring glory to God. In the context of this statement, Jesus points to faith, love, joy, peace, patience, perseverance, hope, as the work of the Holy Spirit in us. This is the kind of fruit that brings glory to God, and this is how to bear fruit. Jesus is the one who produces the fruit through us. Apart from him we can do nothing. He instructs us to abide in him and let his word abide in us. Saturate your heart and your head with God’s word, and then ask. As your heart is transformed by intimacy with Jesus, and you begin to want more than anything for him to be glorified, he invites you to ask. Ask him to do his transforming work in you to bring glory to him. God desires that our lives bear much fruit. Part of that fruit-bearing process is the Father’s pruning. God prunes us so that we will bear more fruit, much fruit for his glory. God is the master gardener, and we can trust him in this pruning process.

Today I’d like to look at another passage where Jesus points us to the way in which we bring glory to God. Jesus said:

Matthew 5:16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.

God is glorified in us by fruit and light. What kind of light does Jesus point to that brings glory to his Father? Let’s look at the passage to find out:

Salt and Light

Matthew 5:1 Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down, his disciples came to him. 2 And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying:

3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 4 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. 5 “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. 6 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied. 7 “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy. 8 “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. 9 “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. 10 “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. 12 Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you.

13 “You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet. 14 “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. 15 Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.

Jesus tells us that we are the salt of the earth and the light of the world. Our lives are designed to put the glory of God on display for all to see. Our lives are to have flavor, taste, our lives are to be good for something, to count for something, to make a difference. Salt was used to keep meat from spoiling. Salt enhances the flavor of food. Salt and light. A lamp brings light to a dark place. It is when we are in the dark that we stumble into danger. When the lights are on, you can see the coffee table and avoid stubbing your toe or stumbling over it or falling down the stairs. Light allows you to see what is there, what is real, what is true. You might imagine a monster in the dark. When the lights are on, you can see what’s really there. In the dark, you might imagine that you are safe. When the lights come on, it reveals the danger you are in. Jesus doesn’t tell us to become salty; he says you are salt; don’t lose your flavor. He doesn’t tell us to become light; he says you are light; don’t try to conceal your light; let your light shine. If you are a follower of Jesus, your life will have a preserving, flavoring, illuminating effect on those around you, for the glory of God.

Re-defining Hero

What kind of person is illuminating and salty? I would naturally think of the hero of the story; someone who is assertive, attractive, brave, bold, determined, courageous, confident, magnetic, resourceful, strong, smart, tenacious, powerful, quick-witted.

What is the kind of person Jesus points to that brings glory to God? Jesus describes the hero of our story as poor in spirit, as one who mourns, one who is meek, hungering and thirsting for righteousness, overflowing with mercy, pure in heart, a peacemaker, one who is persecuted, reviled, spoken evil of. This is an altogether different sort of hero. This is a hero that does not get glory for himself or herself. This is a hero who brings all glory to God alone.

Jesus shows us what this kind of life lived completely for the glory of God looks like.

Poor in Spirit

Matthew 5:3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Luke records similar teaching from Jesus:

Luke 6:20 … “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God.

Luke 6:24 “But woe to you who are rich, for you have received your consolation.

The word ‘poor’ means beggarly, destitute, helpless, powerless, needy. Those who are poor in spirit acknowledge their spiritual need; that they are destitute, helpless and powerless, totally dependent on the mercies of another. This is genuine humility. Paul points us to Jesus as the paramount example of humility in Philippians 2.

Philippians 2:3 Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. 4 Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. 5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, 6 who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.

This kind of humility brings great glory to God. Jesus said his kingdom belongs to those who are poor in spirit. The Psalmist says:

Psalm 34:18 The LORD is near to the brokenhearted

and saves the crushed in spirit.

Jesus drew a contrast between a proud, self-righteous pharisee and a brokenhearted needy desperate tax collector.

Luke 18:13 But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’

Jesus said

Luke 18:14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified, rather than the other. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.”

In Matthew 18,

Matthew 18:1 At that time the disciples came to Jesus, saying, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” 2 And calling to him a child, he put him in the midst of them 3 and said, “Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

Humble, needy, helpless, powerless, dependent, trusting. This brings glory to God.

Those who Mourn

Matthew 5:4 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.

Luke records:

Luke 6:21b “Blessed are you who weep now, for you shall laugh.

Luke 6:25b “Woe to you who laugh now, for you shall mourn and weep.

Mourning, grieving, weeping, is a deep emotional response to that which is wrong. I find it very intriguing that when Jesus attended the funeral of a dear friend, knowing he would call him out of the tomb and restore him to life, knowing that:

John 11:4 …“This illness does not lead to death. It is for the glory of God, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”

Knowing all this, Jesus still responded in a deeply emotional way.

John 11:33 When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in his spirit and greatly troubled. 34 And he said, “Where have you laid him?” They said to him, “Lord, come and see.” 35 Jesus wept. 36 So the Jews said, “See how he loved him!” …38 Then Jesus, deeply moved again, came to the tomb….

Could it be that Jesus brought glory to God not only by raising Lazarus from the dead, but also by feeling deeply, demonstrating profound sorrow over sin and its effects?

Luke records another occasion where Jesus wails over the hard-hearted rebellion of sinners.

Luke 13:34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not!

A few chapters later Jesus weeps again:

Luke 19:41 And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, 42 saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. 43 For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side 44 and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.” 45 And he entered the temple and began to drive out those who sold, 46 saying to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be a house of prayer,’ but you have made it a den of robbers.”

In Mark 3 we see a mixture of emotional responses in Jesus, wrath and grief.

Mark 3:5 And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart,…

Jesus took sin seriously. He was both angered and grieved at the hard-hearted resistance and rebellion of men against their Maker. The prophet Isaiah described Jesus as:

Isaiah 53:3 …a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief; …

Jesus showed us what true mourning that brings glory to God looks like.

The Meek

Matthew 5:5 “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.

Meekness, or gentleness that brings glory to God is perfectly exemplified in Jesus. Jesus said:

Matthew 11:27 All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. 28 Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

The picture we have of Jesus is the one who is absolutely in control, yet meek and humble in heart. At his arrest, John tell us that Jesus was sovereignly protecting his sheep, yet willingly submitting himself to arrest.

John 18:4 Then Jesus, knowing all that would happen to him, came forward and said to them, “Whom do you seek?” 5 They answered him, “Jesus of Nazareth.” Jesus said to them, “I am he.” Judas, who betrayed him, was standing with them. 6 When Jesus said to them, “I am he,” they drew back and fell to the ground. 7 So he asked them again, “Whom do you seek?” And they said, “Jesus of Nazareth.” 8 Jesus answered, “I told you that I am he. So, if you seek me, let these men go.”

When Jesus was being falsely accused by the Jewish high council,

Mark 14:60 And the high priest stood up in the midst and asked Jesus, “Have you no answer to make? What is it that these men testify against you?” 61 But he remained silent and made no answer. Again the high priest asked him, “Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” 62 And Jesus said, “I am, and you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of Power, and coming with the clouds of heaven.” 63 And the high priest tore his garments and said, “What further witnesses do we need? 64 You have heard his blasphemy. What is your decision?” And they all condemned him as deserving death. 65 And some began to spit on him and to cover his face and to strike him, saying to him, “Prophesy!” And the guards received him with blows.

When accused by the Jews before the Roman governor Pilate

Mark 15:3 And the chief priests accused him of many things. 4 And Pilate again asked him, “Have you no answer to make? See how many charges they bring against you.” 5 But Jesus made no further answer, so that Pilate was amazed.

Jesus was no victim. Jesus said:

John 10:17 For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life that I may take it up again. 18 No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father.”

Jesus was the only one who was in total control at all times. Yet he humbly submitted to abuse, mistreatment, and even unjust execution for the glory of God.

Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness

Matthew 5:6 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

Luke records:

Luke 6:21 “Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you shall be satisfied.

Luke 6:25 “Woe to you who are full now, for you shall be hungry.

When Jesus found his Father’s house turned into a den of thieves,

John 2:15 And making a whip of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and oxen. And he poured out the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables. 16 And he told those who sold the pigeons, “Take these things away; do not make my Father’s house a house of trade.” 17 His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.”

Jesus was passionate about righteousness. He longed for God to be honored and worshiped as he deserves.

The Merciful

Matthew 5:7 “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy.

When the Pharisees brought to Jesus a woman caught in the act of adultery, Jesus invited anyone who is without sin to cast the first stone at her. Jesus, who was completely without sin, Jesus, who was passionate about righteousness and justice,

John 8:11 … And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.”

Jesus brought great glory to God by extending mercy to sinners. That’s what his life was all about. That’s why he came.

Luke 19:10 For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

Pure in Heart

Matthew 5:8 “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.

In the presence of his fiercest critics, Jesus said:

John 8:46 Which one of you convicts me of sin?…

In response to the question “which commandment is the most important of all?”

Mark 12:29 Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ 31 The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Jesus said of his relationship with his Father:

John 8:29 … I always do the things that are pleasing to him.”

Jesus brought glory to God by a clean heart, always putting God first in everything.

Peacemakers

Matthew 5:9 “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.

Jesus spoke peace to the wind and the waves (Mk.4:39); Jesus spoke peace to the woman who touched the hem of his garment for healing (Mk.5:34; Lk.8:48); Jesus spoke peace to the prostitute who washed his feet with her tears (Lk.7:50); Jesus spoke peace to his disciples preparing them for his execution (Jn.14:27; 16:33); Jesus spoke peace to his fear filled disciples hiding in the upper room after his crucifixion (Lk.24:36; Jn.20:19, 21, 26).

Jesus is our peace, reconciling us to God and so killing the hostility (Eph.2:13-19) Jesus brings glory to God by making peace with God through the blood of his cross (Col.1:20).

Persecuted

Matthew 5:10 “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. 12 Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you.

Luke’s gospel says:

Luke 6:22 “Blessed are you when people hate you and when they exclude you and revile you and spurn your name as evil, on account of the Son of Man! 23 Rejoice in that day, and leap for joy, for behold, your reward is great in heaven; for so their fathers did to the prophets.

Luke 6:26 “Woe to you, when all people speak well of you, for so their fathers did to the false prophets.

Happy are those who are persecuted, reviled, spoken evil against, those who are hated, excluded and spurned! What a way to bring glory to God! But this is exactly what Jesus did.

Hebrews 12:2 looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.

This is what Jesus prescribes for us.

Matthew 16:24 Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.

1 Peter 4:13 But rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when his glory is revealed.

1 Peter 4:16 Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name.

Jesus brought great glory to God by his suffering, and he invites us to participate in his suffering to bring glory to God.

Checkup

I want to do what I was created to do. I want to live a life that brings the maximum possible glory to God. Jesus says that

Matthew 5:16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.

These are not the good works of my hard work and self-discipline of keeping my checklist; that would bring glory to me. These are the good works of a transformed heart produced by the Holy Spirit at work in me, flowing out of a life lived in intimate relation with my Lord Jesus. Am I letting my light shine in such a way that my heavenly Father is getting maximum glory?

Is my life characterized by suffering, persecution, rejection because of my connection with Jesus? Do I promote peace with God through the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ? Is my heart pure, totally in love with God? Do I extend God’s costly mercy to those who don’t deserve it? Am I passionately pursuing righteousness in a way that shows that it really is a life and death issue? Can I let go of my rights and allow myself to be wronged in order to show Christlike gentleness? Does my heart hurt over the hard-heartedness of sinners and the horrible consequences of sin and the woeful lack of glory given to God on this earth? Am I brokenhearted over my own God-dishonoring attitude and come to Jesus needy, powerless, helpless, and totally dependent on him? This is the kind of life Jesus describes as shining his light into a dark world and bringing much glory to God. 

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

January 13, 2013 Posted by | occasional, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment