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Preaching from the Pulpit of Ephraim Church of the Bible

Leviticus 6:4-7:10; The Priests Portion and The Blood

06/26 Leviticus 6:24-7:10; The Priests Portion and The Blood Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20160626_leviticus-6_24-7_10.mp3

We are in Leviticus 6-7, a section which deals again with the five sacrifices introduced in chapters 1-5.

Leviticus 1-7

A. Instructions for the People      B. Instructions for the Priests

The Burnt Offering (ch.1)                  The Burnt Offering (6:8-13)

The Grain Offering (ch. 2)                 The Grain Offering (6:14-18)

                                                         The Priest’s Grain Offering (6:19-23)

The Peace Offering (ch.3)

The Sin Offering (4:1-5:13)               The Sin Offering (6:24-30)

The Guilt Offering (5:14-6:7)            The Guilt Offering (7:1-10)

                                                            The Peace Offering (7:11-36)

                                   Summary (7:37-38)

Chapter 1 begins with the Lord speaking to Moses saying ‘speak to the people of Israel and say to them, when any one of you brings an offering to the Lord…’ Chapter 6 begins with the Lord speaking to Moses saying ‘command Aaron and his sons, saying…’ Where chapters 1-5 deal with the five offerings from the perspective of a worshiper who brings his offering to the tabernacle, chapters 6 and 7 give instructions to the priest who must handle the offerings properly.

The Sin Offering

Leviticus 6:24 The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 25 “Speak to Aaron and his sons, saying, This is the law of the sin offering. In the place where the burnt offering is killed shall the sin offering be killed before the LORD; it is most holy. 26 The priest who offers it for sin shall eat it. In a holy place it shall be eaten, in the court of the tent of meeting. 27 Whatever touches its flesh shall be holy, and when any of its blood is splashed on a garment, you shall wash that on which it was splashed in a holy place. 28 And the earthenware vessel in which it is boiled shall be broken. But if it is boiled in a bronze vessel, that shall be scoured and rinsed in water. 29 Every male among the priests may eat of it; it is most holy. 30 But no sin offering shall be eaten from which any blood is brought into the tent of meeting to make atonement in the Holy Place; it shall be burned up with fire.

As we studied in chapters 4 and 5, the sin offering was the offering that was made by an individual or group when they realized they had sinned. Chapter 4 deals with unintentional sins of commission; something was done that ought not to be done, and he incurred guilt, even if the sinner didn’t realize that what he had done was wrong. The first part of chapter 5 deals with unintentional sins of omission; neglecting to do what ought to be done. Even though the these are not willful sins, they incur guilt, and must be atoned for by sacrifice.

Chapter 4 gave instructions for who needed to offer what, and whose sin was more serious.

Eating the Offering

If it was a common person or even a leader, blood from their sacrifice was to be smeared on the horns of the altar of burnt offering in the courtyard of the tabernacle. The choice inward parts, the fat and the organs associated with deep emotion, were to be burned on the altar. Here in chapter 6, we learn what is to be done with the rest of the animal. It is most holy. It is given to the priest who offered it for him to eat, and to share with other priests. Only those who were holy, set apart to God and ritually clean were permitted to touch it. It was not to leave the tabernacle courtyard; it must be eaten only there.

Too Holy To Eat

If it was the high priest, or the whole assembly who sinned, blood from their sacrifice was brought inside the tent to the holy place and sprinkled 7 times in front of the curtain separating the holy place from the most holy place, and some of the blood was smeared on the altar of incense in that holy place. In that case, because the blood of that animal was presented before the Lord in the holy place, it was too holy even for the priests to eat. It was to be burned outside the camp. This is the offering that the author of Hebrews tells us points to Jesus, who suffered outside of Jerusalem.

Hebrews 13:10 We have an altar from which those who serve the tent have no right to eat. 11 For the bodies of those animals whose blood is brought into the holy places by the high priest as a sacrifice for sin are burned outside the camp. 12 So Jesus also suffered outside the gate in order to sanctify the people through his own blood. 13 Therefore let us go to him outside the camp and bear the reproach he endured. 14 For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city that is to come.

The priests of the Old Testament had no right to eat of the sacrifices whose blood was brought into the holy place. Jesus fulfilled this picture as our great High Priest by sacrificing himself as an offering for sin outside the camp. In Jesus we have rights beyond what the Old Testament priests had. We have access to Jesus, the most holy sacrifice of all. He invites us to come, come and feast; ‘this is my body given for you; this is my blood of the covenant poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.’ (Lk.22:19-20; Mt.26:26-28)

The Blood

This passage reminds us how messy the sacrificial system was. There are instructions on what to do with things that come in contact with sacrificial blood. Blood is holy; it is set apart for a very specific use. God says in Leviticus 17

Leviticus 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood, and I have given it for you on the altar to make atonement for your souls, for it is the blood that makes atonement by the life.

Blood symbolizes a life taken, and it was given for the exclusive purpose of making atonement on the altar. Blood was never to be consumed. It was always to be carefully disposed of properly. But remember, the tabernacle, and later the temple was a slaughterhouse. Literally hundreds of animals entered the courtyard alive, and were butchered and processed there. This was a bloody operation. Why? Why all the blood? Because my sin is that bad. The wages of sin is death, and the Levitical system is a sobering reminder of what even unintentional sins cost. This passage deals with what to do if blood is splashed on a priests garment. I imagine that this would be an almost unavoidable occurrence. But that blood is holy. It is given to make atonement. So it is not to be handled lightly. The garment is not to leave the temple courtyard. It is to be washed in a holy place. Now we begin to understand the purpose of the large bronze laver or wash basin near the altar in the courtyard. The priests garments, which were white, must be washed in this holy place.

Remember what Pilate did when he was about to hand Jesus over to be crucified?

Matthew 27:24 …he took water and washed his hands before the crowd, saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.”

He knew he had blood on his hands, blood of an innocent man. He was trying in vain to wash away the guilty stain.

Here we have priests who become splattered with sacrificial blood, who must remove the blood in a holy place. This is the background for some striking imagery in the book of Revelation. In Revelation 7, a great multitude from every nation and tribe and people and language are standing before the throne and before the Lamb clothed in white robes, worshiping God and the Lamb. The question is posed ‘who are these, clothed in white robes, and from where have they come?’

Revelation 7:14 … And he said to me, “These are the ones coming out of the great tribulation. They have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

Robes washed white in blood! The blood of Jesus the Lamb washes all our stains away!

Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?
Are you fully trusting in His grace this hour?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Are you washed in the blood,
In the soul cleansing blood of the Lamb?
Are your garments spotless? Are they white as snow?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Are you walking daily by the Savior’s side?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?
Do you rest each moment in the Crucified?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Lay aside the garments that are stained with sin,
And be washed in the blood of the Lamb;
There’s a fountain flowing for the soul unclean,
O be washed in the blood of the Lamb!

[Words & Music: Elisha A. Hoffman, Spiritual Songs for Gospel Meetings and the Sunday School (Cleveland, Ohio: Barker & Smellie, 1878)]

Blood is given to make atonement. It is powerful, and to be handled with care. If the sacrifice comes in contact with a bronze container, it must be scoured and rinsed. But if it comes in contact with a clay pot, the pot must be broken. Earthenware containers, which are porous, could not satisfactorily be cleansed to remove all traces of blood. They must be destroyed. It is interesting that we are likened to earthenware pots in 2 Corinthians 4

2 Corinthians 4:6 For God, …has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. 7 But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us.

Earthenware pots must be destroyed if they come in contact with sacrificial blood.; Have you been broken? Have you been wrecked and undone because you have come in contact with the blood?

1 John 1:7 But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin.

Have you been cleansed by the blood? As earthenware vessels, we must be broken. We must realize what we deserve. We must realize that we are unworthy, and that is what it means to experience grace, because grace is undeserved. We must come to the end of ourselves, be broken before him, to demonstrate that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us. And the amazing thing is that when we are broken, he will use us!

Psalm 147:3 He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds.

We now hold the treasure of the gospel shining out from our broken hearts!

The Guilt Offering

Leviticus 7:1 “This is the law of the guilt offering. It is most holy. 2 In the place where they kill the burnt offering they shall kill the guilt offering, and its blood shall be thrown against the sides of the altar. 3 And all its fat shall be offered, the fat tail, the fat that covers the entrails, 4 the two kidneys with the fat that is on them at the loins, and the long lobe of the liver that he shall remove with the kidneys. 5 The priest shall burn them on the altar as a food offering to the LORD; it is a guilt offering. 6 Every male among the priests may eat of it. It shall be eaten in a holy place. It is most holy. 7 The guilt offering is just like the sin offering; there is one law for them. The priest who makes atonement with it shall have it.

The guilt offering was for sins of robbing God our our neighbor. There are specific details of the instruction here that were not listed in the section on the guilt offering in chapters 5-6. Like the sin offering, the inward parts are offered to God. The guilt offering makes atonement, bringing reconciliation with God and man. This offering, like the sin offering, is to be holy food for the priests.

Miscellaneous Possessions of the Priests

Verses 8-10 address miscellaneous possessions which belong to the priests.

Leviticus 7:8 And the priest who offers any man’s burnt offering shall have for himself the skin of the burnt offering that he has offered. 9 And every grain offering baked in the oven and all that is prepared on a pan or a griddle shall belong to the priest who offers it. 10 And every grain offering, mixed with oil or dry, shall be shared equally among all the sons of Aaron.

The language here is language of possession. These are the things that by God’s design are offered to him and they become the possession of those who serve him. Paul says in 1 Corinthians 9

1 Corinthians 9:13 Do you not know that those who are employed in the temple service get their food from the temple, and those who serve at the altar share in the sacrificial offerings? 14 In the same way, the Lord commanded that those who proclaim the gospel should get their living by the gospel.

He also tells Timothy:

1 Timothy 5:17 Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching. 18 For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle an ox when it treads out the grain,” and, “The laborer deserves his wages.”

This indicates that the priests who served in the temple didn’t pack a lunch. They showed up in faith, depending on the goodness of God to provide for their needs. Those who served were those who first benefited from the offering. The priests portion was not stored up. It needed to be eaten right away. Day by day they were relying on God to provide for their needs.

Jesus taught us to pray:

Matthew 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread,

He went on to say:

Matthew 6:31 Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ 32 For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. 33 But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. 34 “Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

May we be satisfied as we serve him to lean on him every day in total helpless dependence.

Are you fully trusting in His grace this hour?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Are your garments spotless? Are they white as snow?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Do you rest each moment in the Crucified?
Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

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June 27, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leviticus 5:14-6:7; The Guilt Offering

05/22 Leviticus 5:14-6:7; The Guilt / Reparation Offering ; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20160522_leviticus-5_14-6_7.mp3

We have been studying the 5 offerings in the first chapters of Leviticus. This is the sacrificial system that points us to Jesus, the once for all sacrifice for all our sin. We learn much about Jesus, much about our sin and hopeless condition, and about forgiveness by studying the sacrifices of the Old Covenant.

The whole burnt offering of chapter 1 points us to our sinful nature, our sinful self, which needs to be wholly consumed and done away with. We are not just a little bit sinful, we are sinful through and through.

The grain offering of chapter 2 shows us that God is a great King, a good King, and we gladly render to him tribute, acknowledging his rightful rule over everything we are and possess. All the work of our hands is ultimately a gift from his good hand, and we gladly own our indebtedness to him by offering to him a portion.

The peace or fellowship offering of chapter 3 is a shared meal, in which some is burned on the altar to the LORD, some is eaten by the priests, and some is enjoyed by the worshiper, in a feast celebrating our reconciled relationship with God, enjoying fellowship with him.

The sin offering of chapters 4 and 5 deal with specific instances of sin, sins of commission, doing what ought not to be done; and sins of omission, failing to do what ought to be done. When we confess our sins, God is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness (1Jn.4:9).

Today we come to the guilt or reparation offering of chapters 5 and 6. This is an offering that deals with a new category of sin. This is an offering for when we have taken something that does not belong to us, and it requires repayment or restitution.

Robbing God

Chapter 5:14-19 deals with sins against the Lord. Chapter 6:1-7 deals with sin against our neighbor.

Leviticus 5:14 The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 15 “If anyone commits a breach of faith and sins unintentionally in any of the holy things of the LORD, he shall bring to the LORD as his compensation, a ram without blemish out of the flock, valued in silver shekels, according to the shekel of the sanctuary, for a guilt offering. 16 He shall also make restitution for what he has done amiss in the holy thing and shall add a fifth to it and give it to the priest. And the priest shall make atonement for him with the ram of the guilt offering, and he shall be forgiven.

This section is again introduced by the statement “The LORD spoke to Moses, saying…” This phrase is repeated throughout the book of Leviticus, reminding us that this is the very word of God, spoken directly by him to instruct his people. We would do well to listen.

This section deals with a breach of faith in any of the holy things. A breach of faith is an act of treachery, and act of unfaithfulness to a covenant partner. This word is used of adultery in Numbers 5; being unfaithful to a covenant partner. It is used of idolatry in Numbers 31. It is used of taking that which has been dedicated to the LORD in Joshua 7. Here it is said to be unintentional, unwitting, an error or mistake, a sin of ignorance. There are no examples of what kind of things constitute a breach of faith in this passage. One example is given in Leviticus 22, which deals with how to handle the things which have been dedicated or set apart as holy to the Lord. No one who is unclean is to come in contact with anything which is holy.

Leviticus 22:14 And if anyone eats of a holy thing unintentionally, he shall add the fifth of its value to it and give the holy thing to the priest. 15 They shall not profane the holy things of the people of Israel, which they contribute to the LORD, 16 and so cause them to bear iniquity and guilt, by eating their holy things: for I am the LORD who sanctifies them.”

So one example of a breach of faith would be a mix up at the altar, where a worshiper ate something that was set apart for only the priest to eat. We might say it was an innocent error. But God does not see it that way. He declares it a guilty error, although inadvertent. It is an error that brings guilt and must be dealt with by sacrifice and by compensation.

Another example of a breach of faith could be like the sin of Achan in Judges 7, where he kept for himself that which had been dedicated to God. This could happen through failure to pay a vow to the Lord, or failure to give to him the time that is owed to him, in sabbaths and feast days, withholding from him what is his due.

These are sins against the Lord, robbing or defrauding God himself of what is his due, taking things which belong to him. The repayment is made to God. A ram is brought for a sacrifice to make atonement, and the debt must be repaid. Whatever was taken from God, withheld from God, must be repaid, and a double tithe, 20% must be added. This 1/5th is a double recognition of God’s rights over all. We are ordinarily to give him a tenth of everything, acknowledging his rights over all. If we have committed a breach of faith in the things that are set apart as belonging to the Lord, then when we realize our guilt, we are to doubly acknowledge his rightful ownership over all, and give to him 20% in addition to what we withheld.

Our primary sin is sin against God.

Romans 3:23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,

What does it mean to fall short of the glory of God? To be deficient in the glory which belongs to God? We are told in chapter 1, they ‘suppress the truth …about God’ (1:18-19); ‘they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him’ (1:21); they ‘exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images’ (1:23); ‘they exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator’ (1:25); ‘they did not see fit to acknowledge God’ (1:28); they ‘presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience (2:4); they are ‘self-seeking’ (2:8); ‘no one seeks for God. All have turned aside’ (3:11-12); ‘there is no fear of God before their eyes’ (3:18). All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. God is glorious. He deserves all our affection, all our devotion. He deserves all our adoration, all our praise. We defraud God when we withhold from him his due.

After paying back what is owed to God, a ram was to be offered as a sacrifice to cover guilt and bring restoration of fellowship with God. Listen to these verses from Romans 3!

Romans 3:21 But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction: 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, 25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. …

Amazing grace, how can it be! The riches of undeserved grace! Grace so amazing, so divine, demands my heart, my life, my all!

Ambiguous Guilt

Leviticus 5:17 “If anyone sins, doing any of the things that by the LORD’s commandments ought not to be done, though he did not know it, then realizes his guilt, he shall bear his iniquity. 18 He shall bring to the priest a ram without blemish out of the flock, or its equivalent for a guilt offering, and the priest shall make atonement for him for the mistake that he made unintentionally, and he shall be forgiven. 19 It is a guilt offering; he has indeed incurred guilt before the LORD.”

What is interesting about this offering is the ambiguity of the offense. Someone has done something but he did not know what he did. He realizes his guilt and brings a sacrifice, but there is no reparation, no restitution, probably because the offense is unknown. This is a sacrifice for the Israelite believer with a sensitive conscience. He feels a sense of guilt, he has searched his heart, but he can’t put his finger on his offense. But his conscience is troubled. He feels distant from the Lord. The guilt is real. Even for this there is an offering. The priest shall make atonement for him …and he shall be forgiven. God is so gracious. He even makes a way for sins we can’t identify to be forgiven.

Restitution

Chapter 6 deals with a new category of sin. All the offerings up to this point are entirely Godward. This offering, although still Godward, also includes an element of making amends with a neighbor one has wronged. It begins with the statement that the Lord is speaking.

Leviticus 6:1 The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “If anyone sins and commits a breach of faith against the LORD by deceiving his neighbor in a matter of deposit or security, or through robbery, or if he has oppressed his neighbor 3 or has found something lost and lied about it, swearing falsely—in any of all the things that people do and sin thereby— 4 if he has sinned and has realized his guilt and will restore what he took by robbery or what he got by oppression or the deposit that was committed to him or the lost thing that he found 5 or anything about which he has sworn falsely, he shall restore it in full and shall add a fifth to it, and give it to him to whom it belongs on the day he realizes his guilt. 6 And he shall bring to the priest as his compensation to the LORD a ram without blemish out of the flock, or its equivalent for a guilt offering. 7 And the priest shall make atonement for him before the LORD, and he shall be forgiven for any of the things that one may do and thereby become guilty.”

These sins are sins against a neighbor. But they are also sins against the Lord; a breach of faith against the Lord. To sin against a person God created for his pleasure is to sin against God himself. God defends the rights of his people. If you have wronged your neighbor in one of these ways, you must make it right with your neighbor, and you must offer God a sacrifice.

These offenses are not inadvertent sins. These are intentional sins. They consist of taking what does not belong to you by various means. You may be entrusted with your neighbor’s possession for safekeeping, and you lie to keep what belongs to him. You may simply take what does not belong to you through violence. You may use your power or position to oppress someone and take what belongs to them. You may owe wages to someone who worked for you, but you delay paying them. You may have found something that belongs to someone else, and you decided to keep it, and when asked about it you lied. You may have even sworn an oath before God that you do not have it, calling on God as your witness. This amounts to a violation of the 3rd commandment.

Exodus 20:7 “You shall not take the name of the LORD your God in vain, for the LORD will not hold him guiltless who takes his name in vain.

These are serious sins. But even serious willful sins can be forgiven if there is repentance. ‘If he has sinned and realized his guilt and will restore what he took… he shall restore it in full and shall add a fifth to it, and give it to him to whom it belongs on the day he realizes his guilt.’ Here again we have the additional 20%, recognizing the rights of the property owner. This is interesting, because Exodus 22 requires a thief to pay back double to the one from whom he stole. In Exodus 22, the thief is caught and is required to pay back 200%. In Leviticus 6, the thief feels guilty and of his own initiative seeks to make it right, and he is required to pay back 120%.

Leviticus 6:6 And he shall bring to the priest as his compensation to the LORD a ram without blemish out of the flock, or its equivalent for a guilt offering. 7 And the priest shall make atonement for him before the LORD, and he shall be forgiven for any of the things that one may do and thereby become guilty.”

Not only is restitution made, but a sacrifice to the Lord is required, because all sin is sin against God. The wages of sin is death, and the price must be paid. Atonement must be made.

This kind of behavior is rooted in covetousness. I want what I don’t have. So I am willing to take what doesn’t belong to me to get what I think will make me happy. I need a heart change. I need new desires. I need a new perspective.

Love Your Neighbor

It matters how we respond to God, and it matters how we treat other people. God is the one who said in

Leviticus 19:18 … you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD.

Jesus said it this way:

Matthew 7:12 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.

Paul said in:

Philippians 2:3 Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. 4 Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others

And again in:

Romans 13:9 For the commandments, “You shall not commit adultery, You shall not murder, You shall not steal, You shall not covet,” and any other commandment, are summed up in this word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” 10 Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.

Love does no wrong to a neighbor. Love counts others more significant than yourself. Love looks to the interests of others. We are called not only not to take from another what belongs to them; we are called to love them as we love our self. We begin to realize that in the body of Christ, we are members of one another.

1 Corinthians 12:25 …that the members may have the same care for one another. 26 If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together. 27 Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it.

I begin to realize that my good is wrapped up in the good of my neighbor. We are not isolated, we are connected. I cannot steal from my neighbor and not have it injure me. As part of a covenant community, it is my duty to look out for the interests of others. We see these two great concepts come together here, the vertical and the horizontal, love for God and love for neighbor. Obligation to God and obligation to neighbor. Jesus said that the greatest commandment in the law is:

Matthew 22:37 And he said to him, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. 38 This is the great and first commandment. 39 And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. 40 On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets.”

Sin can be both vertical and horizontal, failure to love God and failure to love neighbor; and restitution must be both vertical and horizontal.

The Ram and the Guilt Offering

The ram was the only animal acceptable for a guilt offering. This calls to mind a father who took his only son up on a mountain to offer him as a sacrifice to the Lord, and the Lord provided a ram caught in the thicket by its horns as a substitute sacrifice. We are to withhold nothing from the Lord.

This points forward to another sacrifice, another Father and his only Son, another substitute.

Isaiah 53:4 Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; …. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all. …10 Yet it was the will of the LORD to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. 11 Out of the anguish of his soul he shall see and be satisfied; by his knowledge shall the righteous one, my servant, make many to be accounted righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities. 12 …he poured out his soul to death and was numbered with the transgressors; yet he bore the sin of many, and makes intercession for the transgressors.

This is the one who is an “asham” a guilt offering. He was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all. It was the will of the LORD to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt. he bore the sin of many, and makes intercession for the transgressors. Jesus is my guilt offering. He is the guilt offering that covers my guilt in failing to give God his due and falling short of the glory of God. He is the guilt offering that covers my guilt before God when I have sinned against another person. He bore my sin. He was pierced for my transgressions. He was crushed for my iniquities. My iniquities were laid on him. The Lord crushed him as an offering for my guilt.

Romans 3:21 But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction: 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, 25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. …

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

May 25, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leviticus 4; The Sin Offering

05/08 Leviticus 4; The Sin Offering; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20160508_leviticus-4.mp3

We are not under law; we are under grace. Praise God we are under grace! ‘The law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death’ (Rom.8:2). But the law is our schoolmaster to bring us to Christ (Gal.3:24), and ‘whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope’ (Rom.15:4). The Scriptures give us instruction, give us encouragement, give us hope, hope in Christ! We are not under law, but we can learn from the law. ‘All Scripture is …profitable …for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness (2Tim.3:16). We can benefit greatly from this training in righteousness that the law offers us.

Overview

We are in Leviticus 4, which deals with a new category of sacrificial offering to the Lord. The first three offerings were voluntary offerings, said to be offerings ‘with a pleasing aroma to the Lord’. The whole burnt offering was an entire animal that went up in smoke to the Lord, addressing our sin nature. The grain offering was a tribute offering of the work of our hands, given in tribute to our new King. The peace or fellowship offering was a shared meal that celebrated our reconciled relationship of peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Leviticus 4 begins with the words ‘And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, ‘speak to the people of Israel, saying’. These words, similar to the words which open the book, indicate that this is a new section dealing with different issues. Chapter 4:1 – 5:13 deals with the sin offering, and Chapter 5:14 – 6:7 deals with the guilt offering. These are both required offerings when any person sins.

Chapter 4 begins with an introductory statement of the sin offering, then lists four categories of people, and the procedure for making atonement for that person. Verses 3-12 deal with the anointed priest; verses 13-21 deal with sins of the whole congregation; verses 22-26 deal with sins of a leader; and verses 27-35 deal with the atonement for the common people. Chapter 5:1-13 lists four specific occasions in which a person would incur guilt and gives three different types of offering dependent on what the worshiper can afford.

Unintentional Sins

Leviticus 4:1 And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “Speak to the people of Israel, saying, If anyone sins unintentionally in any of the LORD’s commandments about things not to be done, and does any one of them,

One startling thing to notice right up front in this chapter is that this offering makes atonement and brings forgiveness for unintentional sins. Did you even know there was a category for that? Verses 13, 22, and 27 clarify that if he “sins unintentionally in doing any one of the things that by the LORD’s commandments ought not to be done, and realizes his guilt, or the sin which he has committed is made known to him”. These could be sins of ignorance, ‘I didn’t know that God considers this a sin’; they could be sins of carelessness, ‘I was not paying attention or thinking and I did this’; or they could be accidental sins, ‘I didn’t mean to do this but it happened’. What is startling about all of these is that they all require the death penalty. The bull or goat or lamb doesn’t get a spanking or a time-out. It is killed. Even unintentional sins miss the mark of God’s perfect standard, and the wages of sin is death. Sin is serious. Deadly serious.

Numbers 15 helps us understand this category of unintentional sins. Verses 22-29 form a rough parallel to Leviticus 4. Verses 24-26 deal with atonement for unintentional sins of the whole congregation; and verses 27-29 deal with atonement for unintentional sins of the individual in very similar terms to what we have here in Leviticus 4. But verses 30-31 draw a distinction between unintentional sins and sins done with a high hand, and then verses 32-36 give an incident as an application of this principle.

Numbers 15:28 And the priest shall make atonement before the LORD for the person who makes a mistake, when he sins unintentionally, to make atonement for him, and he shall be forgiven. …30 But the person who does anything with a high hand, whether he is native or a sojourner, reviles the LORD, and that person shall be cut off from among his people. 31 Because he has despised the word of the LORD and has broken his commandment, that person shall be utterly cut off; his iniquity shall be on him.”

There is no sacrifice, no atonement, no forgiveness for sins done intentionally, in willful disobedience, with a high hand. The person who does this is said to revile the LORD, to despise the word of the LORD, and breaks his commandment. Have you ever heard someone say, maybe you’ve said it yourself ‘I know this is wrong, but God is gracious, he will forgive me. After all, I’m not under law, I’m under grace.’ This is dangerous thinking. Paul answers this in Romans 6.

Romans 6:14 For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace. 15 What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! 16 Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness?

Here’s the event that illustrates the principle in Numbers 15:

Numbers 15:32 While the people of Israel were in the wilderness, they found a man gathering sticks on the Sabbath day. 33 And those who found him gathering sticks brought him to Moses and Aaron and to all the congregation. 34 They put him in custody, because it had not been made clear what should be done to him.

Gathering sticks. Maybe he and his family were cold. He needed to build a fire to stay warm or to cook over. What’s the big deal? God said:

Exodus 20:8 “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. 9 Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, 10 but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates.

This man was despising the word of the LORD. He was reviling the Lord. He was deliberately breaking the commandment.

Numbers 15:35 And the LORD said to Moses, “The man shall be put to death; all the congregation shall stone him with stones outside the camp.” 36 And all the congregation brought him outside the camp and stoned him to death with stones, as the LORD commanded Moses.

There was no sacrifice, no atonement, no forgiveness for a high-handed intentional sin.

We tend to categorize sins; ‘all I did was tell one little white lie’. Only one, it was little, and it was white; I meant no harm, it didn’t hurt anybody. What category would God put this sin under? It is a lie, intended to deceive, an intentional, a willful, a high handed sin. ‘Thou shalt not bear false witness’ (Ex.20:16).

Numbers 35 helps us to understand what is meant by an unintentional sin.

Numbers 35:11 then you shall select cities to be cities of refuge for you, that the manslayer who kills any person without intent may flee there. …15 These six cities shall be for refuge for the people of Israel, and for the stranger and for the sojourner among them, that anyone who kills any person without intent may flee there.

Without intent. This is the same word we have in Leviticus 4. Killing can be unintentional, and if it is unintentional, there is protection provided for the one guilty of manslaughter. There is a distinction drawn. If he used and iron, stone, or wooden tool that could cause death, he is a murderer.

Numbers 35:20 And if he pushed him out of hatred or hurled something at him, lying in wait, so that he died, 21 or in enmity struck him down with his hand, so that he died, then he who struck the blow shall be put to death. He is a murderer. The avenger of blood shall put the murderer to death when he meets him.

22 “But if he pushed him suddenly without enmity, or hurled anything on him without lying in wait 23 or used a stone that could cause death, and without seeing him dropped it on him, so that he died, though he was not his enemy and did not seek his harm, 24 then the congregation shall judge between the manslayer and the avenger of blood, in accordance with these rules.

The motive is considered. If it was a sudden reaction, if it was not premeditated, if he did not intend to do harm, if it was an accident, these were considered unintentional. They were still sin, the taking of a life in God’s image, but they were unintentional, and forgivable.

Go and Tell Him His Fault

So much of our sin is unintentional. We simply have no idea. Often an unintentional sin is a sin you don’t know you committed. Verse 13 says ‘the thing is hidden from the eyes of the assembly’. We are often blind to our unintentional sins. Verse 14 says ‘when the sin which they have committed becomes known’. I can’t seek forgiveness if I don’t know I have sinned. We are not told how the sin becomes known. It could be conviction from the Holy Spirit, or a feeling of guilt. Verses 23 and 28 say ‘the sin which he has committed is made known to him’. We need each other to help with blind spots. This does not authorize you to become the sin police, eagerly finding fault with your neighbor and relishing every opportunity to point it out. But it is helpful to know that often the sins of our brothers and sisters are unintentional sins. We feel hurt, offended, slighted, mistreated. That passing comment really cut deep. This is why Jesus tells us:

Matthew 18:15 “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained your brother.

Note well, Jesus does not say ‘if your brother sins against you, give him the cold shoulder until he realizes what evil he has done’; He does not say ‘if your brother sins against you, bitterly rehearse in your heart how hurtful it was over and over again while you wait for him to crawl back to you in contrite penance’. He does not say ‘go talk to your other brothers and sisters to see if they have also been hurt in similar ways by the offending party’. Notice also that Jesus does not say ‘if you sin against your brother, go apologize to him’, because this kind of sin we are often blind to. Jesus tells us to go directly and privately to our brother or sister who sinned against us, and tell them their fault, because they probably have no idea that they hurt you! If you go to them directly, that gives them the opportunity to say ‘I am so sorry you took it that way! That is not at all what I meant’.

Sometimes the issue is more serious. We need to be watching out for one another, encouraging one another. We need to have the humility to be aware that we have blind spots, and be thankful that we have brothers and sisters who love us.

Galatians 6:1 Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness. Keep watch on yourself, lest you too be tempted.

When we realize our guilt, then we lay our hand on the head of the animal. We identify with the animal, that we deserve to die, and it will die in our place. We confess our sins, agreeing with God that even our unintentional sin is worthy of punishment.

All Have Sinned

Who is it that the sin offering is meant for? The first instance is ‘if it is the anointed priest who sins’ (3); then ‘if the whole congregation of Israel sins’ (13) ; then ‘when a leader sins’ (22); finally, ‘if anyone of the common people sins’ (27). Who is left out of this chapter? This covers absolutely everyone. We know the verses ‘none is righteous, no not one’ and ‘all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God’ (Rom.3:10, 23), but do we really believe this? God is communicating to his people that everyone sins. Religious leaders, national leaders, everyone. We tend to hold religious leaders to a different standard. Religious leaders should never sin. And if they do sin, their sin is unforgivable. Your pastor is human. He is a sinner in need of forgiveness. If you expect sinless perfection, your expectations are misplaced. Jesus is the only one who has never sinned and will never sin.

Some might think, ‘well, I’m no one of significance, so it doesn’t matter what I do’. Not true! From the great high priest to the national leader to the common person, sin brings guilt and requires forgiveness through an atoning sacrifice.

It is interesting to see that there is such a thing as corporate guilt. A group of people, the whole congregation, can sin. We tend to think of sin as exclusively an individual matter. But this text is clear that whole groups of people, just like individuals, can have blind spots and can sin unintentionally. Whole congregations can be guilty and in need of forgiveness. Often in Israel’s history we see the congregation grumbling against God or its leaders, and the Lord was displeased.

Not Many Should Become Teachers

While all sin is sin against God that brings guilt and requires atoning sacrifice to be forgiven, the sins of some are more weighty and require a greater offering. The sins of the national leader requires a male goat, while the sins of a common person requires a female goat or lamb. For both of these, the blood is smeared on the horns of the bronze altar of burnt offering in the courtyard of the tabernacle. But for the sin of the anointed priest or the whole congregation, a bull is required, and the blood must be presented in the holy place, applied to the curtain and to the horns of the golden altar of incense.

Leviticus 4:3 if it is the anointed priest who sins, thus bringing guilt on the people, then he shall offer for the sin that he has committed a bull from the herd without blemish to the LORD for a sin offering. 4 He shall bring the bull to the entrance of the tent of meeting before the LORD and lay his hand on the head of the bull and kill the bull before the LORD. 5 And the anointed priest shall take some of the blood of the bull and bring it into the tent of meeting, 6 and the priest shall dip his finger in the blood and sprinkle part of the blood seven times before the LORD in front of the veil of the sanctuary. 7 And the priest shall put some of the blood on the horns of the altar of fragrant incense before the LORD that is in the tent of meeting, and all the rest of the blood of the bull he shall pour out at the base of the altar of burnt offering that is at the entrance of the tent of meeting. 8 And all the fat of the bull of the sin offering he shall remove from it, the fat that covers the entrails and all the fat that is on the entrails 9 and the two kidneys with the fat that is on them at the loins and the long lobe of the liver that he shall remove with the kidneys 10 (just as these are taken from the ox of the sacrifice of the peace offerings); and the priest shall burn them on the altar of burnt offering. 11 But the skin of the bull and all its flesh, with its head, its legs, its entrails, and its dung— 12 all the rest of the bull—he shall carry outside the camp to a clean place, to the ash heap, and shall burn it up on a fire of wood. On the ash heap it shall be burned up.

The sin of the leader and the individual remain in the outer court, but the sin of the priest and of the whole congregation penetrate into the very presence of God. This is why James tells us:

James 3:1 Not many of you should become teachers, my brothers, for you know that we who teach will be judged with greater strictness.

The blood needed to be splattered seven times on the heavy curtain that separates the most holy place from the holy place. Imagine the priest, who daily entered the holy place to tend the lamps, replace the bread of the presence, and burn incense, who would daily see the blood splattered on the curtain, a reminder of his own sinfulness before God. A reminder of his weighty responsibility. But also a reminder of God’s provision of forgiveness. He was able to enter into the holy place by means of blood. Repeated four times in this chapter we find the affirmation ‘and the priest shall make atonement for him and he shall be forgiven’ (20, 26, 31, 35). What good news this is! The priest makes atonement, but it is God who forgives. This is why the statement of Jesus to the paralyzed man that ‘your sins are forgiven’ (Mk.2:5) was so shocking. Only God can forgive sins!

Jesus the Better Priest

This of course, like all the offerings, points us to Jesus.

Hebrews 4:15 For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.

Jesus had no sin of his own that required a sacrifice.

Hebrews 7:27 He has no need, like those high priests, to offer sacrifices daily, first for his own sins and then for those of the people, since he did this once for all when he offered up himself.

Hebrews 10 specifically mentions the sin offering as being obsolete because of Jesus.

Hebrews 10:8 When he said above, “You have neither desired nor taken pleasure in sacrifices and offerings and burnt offerings and sin offerings” (these are offered according to the law), 9 then he added, “Behold, I have come to do your will.” He does away with the first in order to establish the second. 10 And by that will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. 11 And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. 12 But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God,

We have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus once for all!

Hebrews 13 refers to the sin offering being burnt outside the camp. Lepers and the unclean were forced to reside outside the camp.

Hebrews 13:11 For the bodies of those animals whose blood is brought into the holy places by the high priest as a sacrifice for sin are burned outside the camp. 12 So Jesus also suffered outside the gate in order to sanctify the people through his own blood. 13 Therefore let us go to him outside the camp and bear the reproach he endured.

Praise God forgiveness through Jesus is not limited to unintentional sins.

1 John 1:9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

May 9, 2016 Posted by | Leviticus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Indictment of Christmas

12/21 Indictment of Christmas; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20141221_indictment-of-christmas.mp3

This is the season of Advent, a Latin word that means ‘coming.’ This is the season we focus on the coming of Jesus into the world. We can take this opportunity to search our hearts and open our lives to Jesus. I was reading an advent devotional that caught my attention. It said “Christmas is an indictment before it becomes a delight”. An indictment!

Coming

How is Christmas an indictment? For that we need to look at the reason Jesus came. But before we look at the reason, it is important to note the bare fact that he came. Jesus came into the world. That implies that he came from somewhere. He did not have his beginning here. He came from outside our world. He existed before he was conceived. Especially in the gospel of John, Jesus makes it clear that he was uniquely sent by his Father. Not sired, but sent. He was born into this world at a specific point in time, he made his appearance, and that is what we celebrate at Christmastime, but that was not his beginning. In fact Jesus claims to have no beginning.

John’s gospel opens with:

John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God.

In verse 14, we see

John 1:14 And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.

So Jesus, the Word, the only Son from the Father, was in the beginning. He didn’t begin, he simply was. He was with God, and he was God.

Jesus states in:

John 8:58 Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.”

Not ‘I was’ or ‘I existed’ before Abraham, but ‘I am’, I exist. He is identifying himself with the eternal God, who had no beginning and will have no end. Jesus ‘is’. He always was, he is, and he always will be, or as Hebrews tells us

Hebrews 13:8 Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

Just before he is crucified, in John 17, Jesus prays to his Father:

John 17:5 And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had with you before the world existed.

So Jesus, who eternally existed as God together with his Father, at a point in time came. He was born into this world as a human baby. He became something he was not before, he became flesh. He came. This is what we celebrate at Christmastime. And his coming is an indictment.

Indictment

Indictment (noun)

-Law: A formal accusation initiating a criminal case, presented by a grand jury and usually required for felonies and other serious crimes.

-Any charge, accusation, serious criticism, or cause for blame.

Sinners

How is Christmas an accusation, a charge, blame for serious crimes? For that we must look at the reason stated for why Jesus was sent or came into the world. In Luke 5, Jesus tells us:

Luke 5:31 And Jesus answered them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. 32 I have not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance.” (cf. Mt.9:13; Mk.2:17)

Jesus did not come for the righteous. Some people who thought of themselves as righteous, religious leaders and such, were offended that he would associate with people they considered unworthy, dirtbags and scum. We know from verses like:

Romans 3:10 as it is written: “None is righteous, no, not one;

No one is righteous. Not even the self-righteous. No, not one is righteous. Jesus did not come for the righteous. He came for sinners. So if his coming is to have any significance in your life, if it is to mean anything at all to us, you and I must agree with his indictment of us that we are sinners. We are not righteous. As John tells us

1 John 1:8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.

In Luke 5, Jesus also calls us sick.

Luke 5:31 And Jesus answered them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.

Lost

We are sinners, and we are sick. That is why Jesus came. Luke 19 contains another indictment:

Luke 19:10 For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

We are lost. We can’t find our way. We don’t know which way to go. We might search and grope along and try to find our way in the dark, but we cannot. Once I was lost in a system of caves for several hours. I was trying to hurry and took a wrong turn and ended up in an unfamiliar part of the cave system. It took some time, and a process of elimination, but eventually we narrowed down which tunnels were not the way out and which one was, and we were on our way out when we met the rescue party that was coming in to find us. That is not the kind of lost Jesus is talking about – given enough time and a good head on your shoulders, and maybe a fresh set of batteries, you will figure it out. You have lost the way but you can find it again. No, we are lost. Hopelessly lost. Desperately lost. We have never been on the right path, we have a warped sense of direction, and we don’t even understand what the destination is. We cannot seek and find God. He must come to seek and find us. He came to seek us and to save us, because we need to be rescued. If we are not saved by Jesus coming to us, we will remain lost forever.

Condemned

John 3 tells us:

John 3:17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

God sent his Son into the world to save us. The eternal Son, who was sent by his Father, is the means through whom we can be saved. What do we need to be saved from? What is the danger? This verse tells us that the danger is condemnation. As we have seen there is none righteous, no not one. All have sinned (Rom.3:23) and the wages of sin is death (Rom.6:23). 2 Thessalonians describes this condemnation:

2 Thessalonians 1:7 …when the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven … 8 in flaming fire, inflicting vengeance on those who do not know God and on those who do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus. 9 They will suffer the punishment of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might,

So we are sentenced to eternal punishment unless we are somehow rescued from God’s just condemnation. Romans 8 tells us how.

Romans 8:1 There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. 2 For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. 3 For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, 4 in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.

God sent his own Son to do what nothing else could do. The law can only condemn. That is the purpose of the law, to point out our faults, failures, and shortcomings. Jesus never sinned, but he was sent by God in the likeness of sinful flesh. He was sent by God for sin, to condemn sin in the flesh. Human sin demanded a human sacrifice. Jesus became flesh, became human, so that he could meet the righteous demands of the law. My sin was condemned in his flesh. 2 Corinthians tell us how.

2 Corinthians 5:21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

Jesus became sin. My guilt was transferred to him. He who knew no sin became sin for my sake. This is why Jesus came. This is why he was born in Bethlehem.

Slaves

Mark 10:45 For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (cf. Mt.20:28)

Jesus, eternal God come in the flesh, had every right to be served. He could have come demanding to be served. He could have arranged to be born in a palace and pampered. Instead he was born in a cave, a stable for animals, his parents laid him in a stone water trough. He was a manual laborer for most of his life, and during his three years of ministry, he was homeless and dependent on the generosity of others. He had nowhere to lay his head (Mt.8:20). But that was no accident. That was by divine design, for he came not to be served but to serve. The King of glory, who possesses everything and needs nothing, came to give us freely what we could never get for ourselves. He came to serve us. Not to be a genie in a bottle that answers our every whim, but he came to serve us in the way we most need to be served. He came to give his life as a ransom. That is yet another indictment. We were slaves. We were in bondage. We sold ourselves into the power of a cruel taskmaster who would not let us go. Jesus paid the price we could never pay to set us free to serve him. The price he paid was not monetary, it was not a trade for any goods or services. He gave his very life as a ransom.

Guilty

That means that our offense was so great that nothing but death would satisfy the demands. He gave his life as a ransom. His life in exchange for our life. Do you ever feel guilty? I mean really guilty? Guilty to the point that you feel you need to go turn yourself in, realizing that you fully deserve the death penalty? Not just guilty before the civil authorities, but before the God of all the earth?

To be honest, most of us probably don’t feel guilty before God. That thought may never have occurred to many of us. Think about it this way. Kings and governments require some kind of tax or service from their citizens in exchange for the protection and provision they offer. Citizens are expected to contribute to the good of the society. If a citizen expected to receive benefits from the blessings the king provides while at the same time refusing to honor or thank the king for those blessings, and instead working for and serving an enemy of the king, we would consider treacherous and treasonous. That is our condition. We breathe his air and eat his food and drink his water, we are warmed by his sun and enjoy his benefits, but we don’t honor him or give him thanks.

Jesus told a story about a landowner who…

Mark 12:1 And he began to speak to them in parables. “A man planted a vineyard and put a fence around it and dug a pit for the winepress and built a tower, and leased it to tenants and went into another country. 2 When the season came, he sent a servant to the tenants to get from them some of the fruit of the vineyard.

Is the demand of the landowner unreasonable? Who invested time and energy and resources into developing the piece of property so that it would be fruitful? What should the attitude of the tenants be toward the master?

Mark 12:2 When the season came, he sent a servant to the tenants to get from them some of the fruit of the vineyard. 3 And they took him and beat him and sent him away empty-handed. 4 Again he sent to them another servant, and they struck him on the head and treated him shamefully. 5 And he sent another, and him they killed. And so with many others: some they beat, and some they killed. 6 He had still one other, a beloved son. Finally he sent him to them, saying, ‘They will respect my son.’ 7 But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ 8 And they took him and killed him and threw him out of the vineyard.

God treats us with generosity, provision, patience, kindness, We respond with greed, presumption, selfishness, dishonor, disrespect. God so loved the world that he gave his only Son (Jn.3:16). He came to his own and his own did not receive him (Jn.1:11). Our ingratitude, dishonor, disregard for the Master is treasonous. We are guilty.

Good News

So Christmas is an indictment. It points out to us how bad we are, and how desperate our situation is. Paul says:

1 Timothy 1:15 The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost.

Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. That is an indictment. If I will benefit in any way from the coming of Christ I must admit that I am sinner. But this is also good news. Yes I am guilty and lost and a slave and a sinner and condemned. But that is the point of Christmas. Jesus came to rescue sinners.

Under Law

Galatians tells us

Galatians 4:4 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, 5 to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

We were under the law. The law was meant to show us how far we fall short of the standard. To be under the law is to be under the crushing weight of condemnation because we fail to keep the law. Jesus came to buy us out from under the obligation of the law. He came not only to buy us out from under the condemnation of the law, but to bring us into a totally new relationship with God, a relationship not based on law. He came so that we could be adopted into his family as sons.

Take Away Sin

1 John tells us why Jesus came.

1 John 3:5 You know that he appeared in order to take away sins, and in him there is no sin.

Jesus came to take away our sins. Not only to remove the guilt of sin, but to conquer sin in us.

1 John 3:8 Whoever makes a practice of sinning is of the devil, for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the works of the devil.

The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the works of the devil. He appeared in order to take away sins. The devil is at work enticing us to sin and then accusing and condemning us when we sin. Jesus paid the price in full for every sin, taking the sting of guilt and condemnation out of our sins, stripping sin of its power over us, and weaning us from our desire to sin.

Love

This is an indictment of our true condition, but this is love.

1 John 4:9 In this the love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so that we might live through him. 10 In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

1 John 4:14 And we have seen and testify that the Father has sent his Son to be the Savior of the world.

God made his love known by sending his Son as an indictment against sinners. “Christmas is an indictment before it becomes a delight. It will not have its intended effect until we feel desperately the need for a Savior” [John Piper “Prepare the Way of the Lord!” – Solid Joys Devotional; from Taste & See article Nov.25, 1985]. God sent his Son to be the wrath-appeasing sacrifice for our sins. God sent his Son on a rescue mission to the lost, to the broken, to the guilty and condemned. God sent his Son to take away our desire to sin and transform our hearts so that we begin to enjoy God for who he is. God sent his Son so that the dead might have life.

What a wonder this is! The first link between my soul and Christ is, not my goodness, but my badness; not my merit, but my misery; not my standing, but my falling; not my riches, but my need. He comes to visit His people, yet not to admire their beauties, but to remove their deformities; not to reward their virtues, but to forgive their sins. O ye sinners, I mean you real sinners, not you who call yourselves by that name simply because you are told that is what you are, but you who really feel yourselves to be guilty before God, here is good news for you! O you self condemned sinners, who feel that, if you are ever to get salvation, Jesus must bring it to you, and be the beginning and the end of it, I pray you to rejoice in this dear, this precious, this blessed Name, for Jesus has come to save you, even you! Go to Him as sinners, call Him “Jesus,” and say to Him, “O Lord Jesus, be Jesus to me, save me, for I need Thy salvation!” Doubt not that He will fulfill His own Name, and exhibit His saving power in you. Only confess to Him your sin, and He will save you from it. Only believe in Him, and He will be your salvation.” [C.H.Spurgeon, Christ’s Incarnation, p.15-16]

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

December 21, 2014 Posted by | occasional, podcast | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Baptism

http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20090301_baptism_message.mp3

20090301 Baptism

Intro:

We are going to baptize some people today. So I want to take some time this morning to explore what God’s word has to say about baptism. I want to look at why we baptize, who we baptize, and what baptism means.

The Command to Baptize

Matthew 28:18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

It is Jesus’ command to his followers that compels us to baptize. We baptize followers of Jesus in obedience to our Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus’ command here is simple: ‘make disciples of all nations’. That is the command. If disciples are to be made from every nation or every ethnic group, then ‘going’ will be necessary. A disciple is a student, a learner, or a follower. There are two primary things Jesus commands that we do with his disciples. We are to baptize them and teach them. Baptism is the initiatory rite that indicates to everyone that they are beginning the life of a disciple, following a new master. Teaching what Jesus taught is the continuation of the process of disciple making.

Jesus is clear as to what his disciples are to be baptized into. In that day it was common for someone who was not Jewish by descent but wanted to worship the God of Israel to be baptized into Judaism as an indication that they had left their old gods behind and had turned to YHWH. John, who was know as ‘the baptist’ or the one who baptized, came with a radical message. He preached a baptism of repentance – calling Jews to turn from their formal outward religion and prepare their hearts for radical transformation.

Jesus here tells his followers to baptize disciples ‘in (or into) the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit’. Jesus does not tell us to baptize into an -ism or a group, but into a name; into a person, into a relationship. One’s name stands for their character, nature or reputation. The word ‘Name’ is singular, as Israel was so clearly taught that ‘the Lord our God is one Lord’.

Deuteronomy 6:4 “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one.

There is one name, one character or nature, one God. And yet Jesus tells us that we are to baptize into the name of three persons: the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. This is one of many reasons why orthodox Christianity since the time of Jesus has held faithfully to the doctrine of the triune God: One God eternally existent in three distinct persons. We baptize into the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

The duration of this command is also stated by Jesus in this verse. How long are we to make disciples, baptizing and teaching? And where does the authority lie? Jesus said ‘all authority has been given to me’. I have no authority – Jesus has all the authority, and Jesus said ‘I am with you always’. The person who does the baptizing is nothing. Jesus carries his own authority. Jesus said ‘I am with you always, to the end of the age’. So as long as this age lasts, we will go on making disciples, baptizing them into the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that he has commanded us, with the confidence that he promised to be with us.

Who Can Be Baptized?

What is the prerequisite for baptism? Baptism is to be done in the disciple making process, so it is for those who have become disciples or followers of Jesus.

Acts 2:38 And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.

Peter said that repentance was what must precede baptism. To repent literally means to turn. I was going in this direction trusting in my good works and thinking I was fine with God, but then I felt the weight of my sin and recognized my good works are filthy rags in God’s sight. Jesus apprehended me and I had to turn around and leave my good works behind and cling to Jesus alone and what he accomplished for me on the cross to forgive my sins. A few verses later, Luke tells us that:

Acts 2:41 So those who received his word were baptized, and there were added that day about three thousand souls.

When Peter proclaimed the good news that ‘everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved’ (v.21) and that the crucified Jesus is the Lord that we must call to for salvation (v.36), those who received his word became followers of Jesus and were baptized.

Acts 8:12 But when they believed Philip as he preached good news about the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.

Both men and women were baptized in response to their belief in the good news message about Jesus.

When the Philippian jailer asked Paul and Silas ‘what must I do to be saved?’, they told him:

Acts 16:30 Then he brought them out and said, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” 31 And they said, “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household.” 32 And they spoke the word of the Lord to him and to all who were in his house. 33 And he took them the same hour of the night and washed their wounds; and he was baptized at once, he and all his family.

Belief in Jesus as Lord brought salvation to each individual in this household. In response to their faith, they were baptized.

Acts 18:8 Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, believed in the Lord, together with his entire household. And many of the Corinthians hearing Paul believed and were baptized.

Those who believe in the Lord, those who call out to Jesus for salvation, who repent or turn from whatever they were trusting in to Jesus, those who become disciples or followers of Jesus are baptized as a public declaration of their new faith.

What Is Baptism?

We’ve looked at Jesus’ command to baptize disciples, and we’ve looked at repentance and faith as the biblical prerequisite for baptism, but just what is baptism and what does it mean? First, a definition of the word itself will be helpful. The word is actually an untranslated carry – over from the Greek language that the New Testament was written in. Rather than translate the word with an English word that has the same meaning, the Greek characters were simply replaced with English characters and [baptizw] became ‘baptize’, a new word in our language. When we study how the word [baptizw] was used in New Testament times, we find that it means ‘to dunk, dip, plunge or immerse’ in water. It might help us understand what the bible is saying if we replace the word ‘baptize’ with the word ‘immerse’.

Baptism is an Illustration of Death, Burial, and Resurrection

Romans 6:3 Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized [immersed] into Christ Jesus were baptized [immersed] into his death? 4 We were buried therefore with him by baptism [immersion] into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life.

Water baptism is a picture of what spiritually happened to us when we trusted Christ. We have been immersed into Christ Jesus, and specifically immersed into his death. Going down into the water pictures our death and burial with Christ. It is an effective picture, because if the one doing the baptizing is not strong enough or not kind enough to bring the person back up out of the water, the picture will become a reality. Jesus referred to his coming crucifixion as a baptism in Mark 10:38-38 and Luke 12:50. Coming up out of the water illustrates our resurrection and new life as believers. Paul is arguing in Romans 6 that we cannot continue to live in sin because we have died to our old sinful way of life, and we are now alive to God in Christ Jesus. As disciples of Jesus, we will live differently, not because we are under a new set of rules, but because we have a new resurrection life in us that has different desires. Paul goes on in the next verses to describe our baptism with Christ as being united with Christ:

5 For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we shall certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. 6 We know that our old self was crucified with him in order that the body of sin might be brought to nothing, so that we would no longer be enslaved to sin. 7 For one who has died has been set free from sin.

We have been crucified with Christ and now we are free from sin.

Baptism is Similar to Circumcision as the Sign of the Covenant

In Colossians 2, baptism is compared to circumcision, the sign of the old covenant. Circumcision was the cutting off of physical flesh; in Christ, our fleshly nature is put off.

Colossians 2:11 In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ, 12 having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead.

This resurrection power comes to me ‘through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised Jesus from the dead.’

Paul goes on to describe our desperate condition and what God did:

13 And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, 14 by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross.

Baptism Follows Justification by Faith

In Galatians 3, Paul is explaining that all the promises of God come not to law keepers, but to those who believe in Jesus. Notice how many times the word ‘faith’ or ‘believe’ occurs:

Galatians 3:22 But the Scripture imprisoned everything under sin, so that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be given to those who believe. 23 Now before faith came, we were held captive under the law, imprisoned until the coming faith would be revealed. 24 So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith. 25 But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a guardian, 26 for in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith. 27 For as many of you as were baptized [immersed] into Christ have put on Christ.

Justification – being absolved of our sins – comes through faith in Jesus Christ. But justification changes us. As we are immersed into Christ, we become so saturated with Christ, that we wear Jesus around and drip him all over everyone we come in contact with.

Baptism Unites with the Body Of Christ

Paul goes on:

28 There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

Our immersion into Christ destroys all ethnic and social and economic barriers. We are now united in a spiritual connection with our brothers and sisters.

1Corinthians 12:13 For in one Spirit we were all baptized [immersed] into one body–Jews or Greeks, slaves or free–and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

Ephesians 4:4 There is one body and one Spirit––just as you were called to the one hope that belongs to your call–– 5 one Lord, one faith, one baptism, 6 one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all.

Baptism Pictures Washing Away Guilt

Peter compares baptism to the ark that brought Noah and his family safely through the waters of the judgment of God.

1Peter 3:21 Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ,

Peter is careful to clarify that it’s not the water of baptism that removes dirt from the body that has any spiritual significance. Rather, it is the removal of dirt from the conscience by crying out to God in faith. Our conscience is washed clean by the blood of Jesus and we are free from guilt because Jesus bore all our sins and paid for them in full.

Baptism in Water or Baptism with the Spirit?

This raises the question ‘what is the difference between baptism in water and the cleansing of the conscience by faith in Jesus?’ John the baptist said:

Matthew 3:11 “I baptize you with water for repentance, but he who is coming after me is mightier than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire.

So there is a distinction between water baptism and Holy Spirit baptism. John did the water baptism, Jesus would do the Holy Spirit baptism. John immersed people in water to symbolize their repentance. Jesus would submerge and saturate people with God’s Holy Spirit. Jesus, when he appeared to his disciples after his resurrection, told them:

Acts 1:5 for John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”

The disciples experienced this, and when Peter preached his first sermon, he said:

Acts 2:38 And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.

The gift of the Holy Spirit is given in response to repentance and faith in Jesus for the forgiveness of sins. Water baptism is a picture of this spiritual reality.

Summary:

Jesus commanded us to baptize believers because baptism is a symbol rich in spiritual significance.

  • It illustrates our baptism by Jesus with the Holy Spirit when we believe in him.

  • It pictures our connection with Jesus in his death and resurrection, demonstrating that we are dead to sin and have new resurrection life so that we can live pleasing to God.

  • Because we have been immersed in the Spirit, we have become one with all other believers.

  • Baptism is done in response to repentance, turning from our way to God’s way, and faith or trust or belief in Jesus as Lord and King, and his finished work on the cross – where he took the punishment in full for my sin.

  • In baptism, we are identified with the name of the triune God – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – as being owned by him.

  • By being baptized, we are declaring to all that we are now disciples, followers of Jesus, submitted, committed and devoted to him.

Jesus said:

Matthew 16:18 …I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.

Matthew 28:18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 20 …And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

Therefore, we can make disciples, baptizing and teaching them.

19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

March 1, 2009 Posted by | occasional, podcast | , , , , , , | 1 Comment