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Preaching from the Pulpit of Ephraim Church of the Bible

2 Corinthians 3:18; Transformed By Beholding

07/08_2 Corinthians 3:18; Beholding and Being Transformed; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20180708_2cor3_18.mp3

The Goal of Sanctification: Christ-likeness

2 Corinthians 3:12 Since we have such a hope, we are very bold, 13 not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face so that the Israelites might not gaze at the outcome of what was being brought to an end. 14 But their minds were hardened. For to this day, when they read the old covenant, that same veil remains unlifted, because only through Christ is it taken away. 15 Yes, to this day whenever Moses is read a veil lies over their hearts. 16 But when one turns to the Lord, the veil is removed. 17 Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

How does sanctification work? This passage answers that question. Where justification is decisive forgiveness, being declared righteous by God through faith in Jesus, sanctification is the process of growing in holiness, growing into the likeness of Jesus. Paul’s desire for the Galatians is that Christ would be formed in them (Gal.4:19). He tells the Romans they are ‘predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son’ (Rom.8:29) and to ‘put on the Lord Jesus Christ’ (Rom.13:14). He instructs the Ephesians to ‘put on the new self, created after the likeness of God’ (Eph.4:24). He tells the Colossians that the new self ‘is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its creator’ (Col.3:10). 1 John looks forward to the day when ‘we shall be like him’ (1Jn.3:2).

Paul is talking about new covenant ministry, ministry of the Spirit. He is talking about being transformed. In 2 Corinthians he is comparing and contrasting the New Covenant ministry with that of the Old, the ministry of the Apostles with that of Moses. There was glory in the ministry of Moses. When he came down from meeting with the Lord face to face, his face was radiating, glorious. But it was a glory that was being brought to an end, being abolished. It was not meant to be the final word. The greater glory brought about by the Spirit remains.

Into The Same Image

This verse talks about Spirit wrought transformation, and the goal of the transformation is clear;

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another…

We are being transformed into the same image. We need to understand the biblical concept of an image to appreciate what Paul is saying. When Jesus was challenged whether or not Jews should pay taxes to their Roman oppressors, he asked to see a coin. He asked whose image and inscription was on it . He responded “render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s” (Mt.22:21; Mk.12:17; Lk.20:25). Jesus was saying that the coin that carries the image of the emperor ultimately belongs to the emperor. And you, who are made in the image of God, ultimately belong to God.

This goes all the way back to Genesis, to creation, where God said:

Genesis 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” 27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.

Man was created to be the image, the visible representation of the invisible God (Deut.4:15-16; Col.1:15; 1Tim.1:17; Heb.11:27), to exercise dominion, to display God’s character and nature. But we refused to acknowledge God as God or give him thanks, we exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images, we exchanged the truth about God for a lie (Rom.1:21,23,25). We defaced and distorted the image of God so that we no longer accurately display what God is like. By Genesis 5:3 we are told that Adam ‘fathered a son in his own likeness, after his image.’ We were created to bear the image of God, but we sinned, and although that image still remains, it is marred and distorted.

But God intends to restore his image in man. 1 Corinthians 15 says:

1 Corinthians 15:49 Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.

We have carried the skewed image handed down to us from Adam. But God intends to remake and restore his image in us. God sent his only Son to be born as a man, who is

Hebrews 1:3 He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature…

John 1:18 says:

John 1:18 No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known.

Jesus is

Colossians 1:15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.

And he says of us:

Romans 8:29 For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers.

The goal of our transformation is to be conformed to the image of Jesus, who is the image of the invisible God.

They Had Been With Jesus

How does this transformation come about? How are we shaped and conformed to the image of Jesus? We are being transformed into the same image from glory into glory. The source of the transformation is glory; the glory of God, and it results in God’s glory being reflected in us. In Acts 4 we are told that the rulers and elders and scribes together with the high priest had taken the apostles into custody because they were preaching salvation in Jesus. It says:

Acts 4:13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were uneducated, common men, they were astonished. And they recognized that they had been with Jesus.

They saw in them an unnatural boldness that they couldn’t explain. In verse 4 it says that in response to their preaching ‘many who heard the word believed, and the number of the men came to about five thousand’. The religious leaders were astonished. The occupation and upbringing of the apostles couldn’t explain this. Their education (or lack thereof) couldn’t explain it. Their social status couldn’t explain it. The only thing they could attribute it to was ‘that they had been with Jesus.’ They had been with Jesus. They had been with Jesus. They didn’t conclude that they had learned from Jesus, or that they had studied under Jesus. The conclusion was that these men had been with Jesus. They had been transformed by being with Jesus. Verse 8 tells us that Peter was ‘filled with the Holy Spirit’ when he spoke. His being filled with the Spirit was a direct result of spending time with Jesus.

Transformed By Beholding

Here in 2 Corinthians we are told that we all have access to this transformation.

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

We are being transformed by beholding. Not by our doing, not by our working, not by our striving, not by our diligence or effort. Not by our studies, not by our learning, but by our looking, by our being with. When Moses went in to meet with God, he came out changed. He didn’t do anything. He didn’t even know that something had happened to him. But everybody could tell. He had been in God’s presence, and it left a mark.

Jesus, describing being born of the Spirit in John 3 said:

John 3:14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.

Jesus is referring back to what happened in Numbers 21, when the people rebelled against God and God sent poisonous serpents to punish them for their sin.

Numbers 21:8 And the LORD said to Moses, “Make a fiery serpent and set it on a pole, and everyone who is bitten, when he sees it, shall live.” 9 So Moses made a bronze serpent and set it on a pole. And if a serpent bit anyone, he would look at the bronze serpent and live.

Note all that was required to be saved was to look. Jesus equates this looking with believing in him. I look in faith to Jesus lifted up on the cross, bearing my sins, and I am saved. This looking to the Son brings about Holy Spirit transformation, the new birth.

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

Beholding we are being transformed. Are you looking? Are you beholding? Does Psalm 63 express your heart?

Psalm 63:1 O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you; my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land where there is no water. So I have looked upon you in the sanctuary, beholding your power and glory. 3 Because your steadfast love is better than life, my lips will praise you.

Are you desperate to be in the presence of God? Does Psalm 27 express your ruling passion?

Psalm 27:4 One thing have I asked of the LORD, that will I seek after: that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the LORD and to inquire in his temple.

Is gazing upon the beauty of the Lord the one thing your seek after? Psalm 17 links beholding with becoming.

Psalm 17:15 As for me, I shall behold your face in righteousness; when I awake, I shall be satisfied with your likeness.

Beholding his face brings about his likeness in us.

We all understand how this works. We become like the one we spend the most time with. We imitate the ones we admire. You pick up the habits, the mannerisms, the idiosyncrasies of the person you spend the most time with. There may be more than one way to accomplish a task, but you tend to do it the way you were shown by the one who taught you. In music or in athletics, this may be intentional. You may spend hours studying someone who is great, working to imitate their techniques. Often this is unconscious. I like to listen to different preachers. In different seasons I might spend more time listening to one or another. If I’m listening to a lot of James MacDonald, I find myself preaching a little more like James. If I am listening to more of John Piper or Timothy Keller, I begin to sound a little more like John or Tim. It’s not intentional. It’s not that I’m trying to mimic them. It just happens. You become like the one you listen to. You pick up things from the one you spend a lot of time with.

The scriptures invite us to imitation. Examples are powerful, both good and bad. Don’t do that; instead be like this. There are at least 10 direct commands or invitations in the New Testament to imitate God or godly people (1Cor.4:16; 11:1; Eph.5:1; 1Thess.1:6; 2:14; 2Thess.3:7,9; Heb.6:12; 13:7; 3Jn.1:11; cf. Lk.6:40).

1 John 3:2 also makes this connection between beholding and being transformed.

1 John 3:2 Beloved, we are God’s children now, and what we will be has not yet appeared; but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is.

We will be like him because – because we shall see him as he is. Seeing results in transformation. Beholding is becoming.

Unmediated Beholding

There is a verbal link between verse 13 and verse 18. The emphatic word ‘καθάπερ‘; ‘just like’ or ‘just as’ appears in both verses. In verse 13 Paul say his boldness or openness is not just like Moses. At the end of verse 18, he says we are being transformed into glory just as from the Lord the Spirit. It is so instructive to see what he does not say. Paul is drawing a contrast between the Old Covenant and the New, between Moses’ ministry and the Apostolic ministry, and he is establishing the authenticity of his own ministry. We would expect him to say it is not just like Moses’ veiled ministry; it is just like our apostolic unveiled ministry. But he completely removes the intermediary. It is not just as the veiled ministry of Moses; it is direct, just as from the Lord the Spirit. The Old Covenant was a mediated ministry; the people had no direct access to the Lord; in fact:

Exodus 20:18 … the people were afraid and trembled, and they stood far off 19 and said to Moses, “You speak to us, and we will listen; but do not let God speak to us, lest we die.”

But in the New Covenant:

1 Timothy 2:5 For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus,

Paul is careful to not place himself in the mediatorial role of Moses. Paul emphatically includes us, his readers, when he says:

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord…

In the New Covenant we have access purchased by the blood of our Lord Jesus, we all have blood-bought access with boldness into the direct presence of Almighty God. We are invited in, to gaze on his beauty, to bask in his glory, to be transformed.

In the Old Covenant, the Israelites could not gaze at Moses face because of its glory (v.7). Moses put a veil over his face so that the Israelites might not gaze (v.13). Even today, a veil lies over the hearts of Israel (v.14). But we all with unveiled faces, beholding the glory of the Lord

How To Behold

How do we look at his face? How do we behold the glory of the Lord? Is this some mystical experience we should seek? Sing some worship songs, close your eyes and visualize? No. Be careful. Deuteronomy 4 warns:

Deuteronomy 4:15 “Therefore watch yourselves very carefully. Since you saw no form on the day that the LORD spoke to you at Horeb out of the midst of the fire, 16 beware lest you act corruptly by making a carved image for yourselves, in the form of any figure, the likeness of male or female,

Don’t make images, metal or mental. God is invisible. You saw no form; you heard only a voice. So how do we behold the glory of the Lord?

This text tells us. See what he says in verses 14 and 15? When they read the Old Covenant with hardened minds the veil remains unlifted. Whenever Moses is read a veil lies over their hearts. Reading the scriptures, seeking Jesus in his written word. Verbal revelation is how we behold. In chapter 2, hearing and smelling were intertwined; he says that his preaching stinks. To some it is the stench of death, to others the smell of life. What he says smells. Here in chapter 3, he mixes hearing with seeing. We behold the glory of the Lord when by the Spirit we turn to see Jesus in his word. Beholding we are being transformed. This comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

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July 8, 2018 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fruit and Looking to Jesus; 2 Corinthians 3

09/03 Fruit and Looking to Jesus; 2 Corinthians 3; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20170903_fruit-looking-to-jesus.mp3

We have been looking at the fruit of the Spirit, Christian character that the Holy Spirit produces in the life of every believer. Las week we looked at the whole fruit; that all of these characteristics of the Spirit controlled life will be growing in a balanced symmetrical way in the follower of Jesus.

Sovereignty and Means

Last week I also mentioned that although it is the Spirit’s work to produce the fruit in our lives, we are also commanded to do things that facilitate his work in our lives. We can say that God sovereignly works in our lives, but he often chooses to do his work through means; often ordinary means. The Bible tells us that Jesus ‘upholds the universe by the word of his power’ (Heb.1:3), and we are told that ‘in him all things hold together’ (Col.1:17). Jesus tells us not to worry about what to eat or drink, he tells us that we are of more value than the birds, ‘and yet God feeds them’ (Luke 12:24). But when we look at the birds, we see them spending time flying around in search of food. And the clear teaching of the New Testament is that ‘If anyone is not willing to work, let him not eat’ (2Thess.3:10). They are commanded to ‘do their work quietly and earn their own living’ (v.12). So God sustains, but he sustains through his appointed means. He can sustain supernaturally, as he did on occasion, sustaining the Exodus generation with bread from heaven in the wilderness, and commanding the ravens to bring bread and meat to Elijah east of the Jordan (1Kings 17). God can sustain supernaturally, but normally he sustains us naturally. We work and earn wages. He gave us the ability to work. It is he that ultimately causes the crops to grow. He gives us the breath in our lungs. He causes our digestive systems to draw sustenance from the food we eat. He causes our cells to carry these nutrients to the parts of our bodies that need them. He sustains us, but he sustains us through his ordinary appointed means like working and eating.

This is the same with the fruit of the Spirit. God the Spirit produces the fruit in our lives, but he chooses to do this through his appointed means. God gives us means of grace. Today and next week I want to look at two of the primary God appointed means God employs to produce his character in our lives. Today we will look at 2 Corinthians 3:18 and the chapters that surround it.

Spiritual Transformation through Beholding

2 Corinthians 3:17 Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

This passage says that spiritual transformation comes through ‘beholding the glory of the Lord with unveiled face.’ This transformation is ‘into the image of our Lord’. First, I want to look at the context to see if it is right for us to link this transformation to the fruit of the Spirit that we have been studying in Galatians. Then I want to ask what it means to behold and how it is that we behold.

Transformation and the Fruit of the Spirit

First, to show that this is talking about the fruit of the Spirit, we need to look at the context. Verse 17 links this to the Spirit of the Lord producing freedom, and verse 18 reminds us that this transformation comes from the Lord who is the Spirit. So there is a direct link to the Holy Spirit in this passage. The transformation we are talking about comes from the Lord who is the Spirit, so the Spirit produces this transformation in us, just as the Spirit produces fruit in Galatians 5.

But if we back up and look at the broader context, we see from the beginning of this chapter that Paul is defending his ministry by pointing to fruit in the lives of the believers he has served.

2 Corinthians 3:1 Are we beginning to commend ourselves again? Or do we need, as some do, letters of recommendation to you, or from you? 2 You yourselves are our letter of recommendation, written on our hearts, to be known and read by all. 3 And you show that you are a letter from Christ delivered by us, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone but on tablets of human hearts.

Paul is saying that the authentication for his ministry is the transformed lives of the Corinthians. He says that they are a letter of commendation ‘written with the Spirit of the living God on the tablets of their human hearts.’ This is the New Covenant transformation that was promised in the Old.

In chapter 4, he describes how this transformation takes place, and what hinders this transformation. He describes this transformation in verse 10 as ‘so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies’ and again in verse 11 ‘so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh.’ The Spirit’s transformation displays the life of Jesus in us. As we studied love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control, we saw that it really is a picture of Jesus. The fruit of the Spirit puts Jesus on display in our bodies, in our interactions with others.

Verse 16 reminds us that the Spirit’s fruit grows gradually. It says ‘our inner self is being renewed day by day.’ This is inner character; fruit that grows slowly, one day at a time.

In chapter 5, he points us to our eagerness to ‘make it our aim to please him’ (v.9). In verse 14-15 he says ‘the love of Christ controls us …that those who live might no longer live for themselves but for him…’ The Spirit controlled life is a life lived to please Jesus. Then he says in verse 17

2 Corinthians 5:17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. 18 All this is from God…

A new creation in Christ. The old life controlled by the flesh is gone. The new life, the Spirit controlled life is here.

I think it is safe to say that this transformation in 2 Corinthians that comes from the Spirit is the same thing that Paul talks about in Galatians 5 as the fruit of the Spirit.

Freedom in the Spirit

How does he say this comes about? What is the means of grace he points us to that God works through to produce this fruit in us?

2 Corinthians 3:17 Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

Notice first, that where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom.

Freedom, not bondage. This is not a legalistic pursuit of moralistic personal character, but a spiritual pursuit of the character of Jesus and the Father produced in us by the Spirit. This is not obligation and debt but transformation and delight. In the Spirit we find true freedom. This is freedom to look and to enjoy.

Unveiled Faces

The freedom comes with unveiled faces. What does this mean? Paul is contrasting the New Covenant, of which he is a minister, with the Old Covenant, of which Moses was the minister. In 3:3 he contrasts the tablets of stone, the document of the Old Covenant, with the tablets of human hearts. In 3:6 he says the Old was of the letter, and it brought death; the New is of the Spirit and it gives life. Verse 9 contrasts the ministry of condemnation with the ministry of reconciliation. Verse 11 contrasts the temporary and fading with the permanent

Beginning in verse 7, he contrasts the glory of the shining face of Moses after coming down from meeting with God, with the greater glory of the ministry of the Spirit. He has in mind Exodus 34, where Moses went up Mount Sinai to receive the second copy of the covenant documents that Israel had broken. He asked God to show him his glory, and God responded:

Exodus 34:6 “The LORD, the LORD, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, 7 keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.”

God revealed his character to Moses. Steadfast love, patience, merciful, gracious, faithful, forgiving, just. God’s glory, God’s character.

Exodus 34:29 When Moses came down from Mount Sinai, with the two tablets of the testimony in his hand as he came down from the mountain, Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God. 30 Aaron and all the people of Israel saw Moses, and behold, the skin of his face shone, and they were afraid to come near him.

God’s character, God’s glory changed the face of Moses. Being in the presence of God changed him. After speaking God’s words to Israel, he would put a veil over his face to keep them from seeing the glory fade. Paul picks this up in 2 Corinthians 3.

2 Corinthians 3:13 not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face so that the Israelites might not gaze at the outcome of what was being brought to an end. 14 But their minds were hardened. For to this day, when they read the old covenant, that same veil remains unlifted, because only through Christ is it taken away. 15 Yes, to this day whenever Moses is read a veil lies over their hearts. 16 But when one turns to the Lord, the veil is removed.

The veil Paul is talking about is the hardness of mind and heart; an unbelieving heart that fails to see Christ as Lord. The veil is removed only through Christ.

In the next chapter Paul explains.

2 Corinthians 4:2 But we have renounced disgraceful, underhanded ways. We refuse to practice cunning or to tamper with God’s word, but by the open statement of the truth we would commend ourselves to everyone’s conscience in the sight of God. 3 And even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing. 4 In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. 5 For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake. 6 For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

Paul says that the veil is a Satanic blinding of the minds of unbelievers to keep them from perceiving the truth of the gospel. This spiritual blindness is only overcome through the plain proclamation of Jesus Christ as Lord, as Creator God speaks light into the dark hearts of unbelievers overcoming their spiritual blindness. This is the unveiled face that beholds the glory of the Lord. This removal of spiritual blindness, this shining the light of the knowledge of God in Jesus, is another way of talking about the new birth. When we were dead, God made us alive in Christ Jesus by grace. When we were blind, God said ‘Let light shine’.

Transformation by Beholding

So a primary evidence of the new birth or regeneration or being saved is being able to see Jesus with new eyes, being able to see the light of the good news of the glory of Christ who is the image of God. Recognizing Jesus Christ as Lord. Being able to perceive with spiritual eyes the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of the Lord Jesus. This is what Paul is talking about when he says back in

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

Just like Moses asked to see the glory of God, and God revealed to him his character, so we see the glory of God in the face of Jesus, who is God in the flesh. We see the glory of God in the gospel. We behold the glory of Jesus in the gospels as his character is portrayed through his interactions with sinners. We see the glory of God in his plan of salvation unfolding as the Son of God is born in a cave in Bethlehem. We see the glory of God culminate at the cross, where the innocent Jesus is condemned to die in the place of guilty sinners. We see the glory of a holy and just God as he pours out his wrath on the substitute, so that through his death we might live. We begin to treasure this God who is

Exodus 34:6 “The LORD, the LORD, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, 7 keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.”

In the face of Jesus we see the glory of God who is

Galatians 5:22 …love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, self-control…

And when we see it, when God gives us eyes to see Jesus, we are transformed. Beholding the glory of the Lord, beholding Jesus and the gospel, we are being transformed. Just like Moses didn’t know it, but others could see it, when we spend time gazing at Jesus, meditating on the good news of Jesus Christ and him crucified, treasuring Jesus, we are being changed. Often others will notice before we do.

2 Corinthians 4 tells us that this transformation is often accompanied by suffering. 4:16 tells us:

2 Corinthians 4:16 So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. 17 For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, 18 as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

We are being renewed day by day, even in the face of suffering as we look to the things that are unseen.

2 Corinthians is not the only place we see this means of transformation. 1 John says:

1 John 3:2 Beloved, we are God’s children now, and what we will be has not yet appeared; but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is.

We shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is. Beholding the glory of the Lord, we are being transformed into the same image.

Gaze on His Beauty

So what is the means of grace that the Spirit of God chooses to utilize to bring about the growth of the fruit of the Spirit in the life of the believer? ‘Beholding the glory of the Lord we are being transformed!’ Transformation by beholding. The Spirit’s fruit grows, Jesus is put on display in my body as I look!

Ask God for eyes to see! Ask him for eyes to see Jesus for who he is. Ask him to break your hardness and resurrect your deadness and overcome your darkness with the marvelous light of his glorious gospel!

This is the one thing the Psalmist pursued

Psalm 27:4 One thing have I asked of the LORD, that will I seek after:

that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life,

to gaze upon the beauty of the LORD and to inquire in his temple.

One thing I ask. One thing I seek. To gaze upon the beauty of the Lord. To see the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, the image of God. The light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus.

So look! Take time to look. To behold. To enjoy. To savor. To treasure. And as you spend time with Jesus, you will be transformed.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

September 4, 2017 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, Fruit of the Spirit, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Knowing God; Romans 1:15-32

08/16 Knowing God

Today I want to launch us on a study of God. Who God is, what he is like,

I want to spend some time together looking at what the Bible says about who God is. I believe it will be beneficial to our minds and our hearts to open God’s word and to seek him there. As we seek his face, we must learn to respond to him rightly, in worship and service and thanksgiving. It is not enough just to know what he is like, to know facts about him, to gain an understanding of his character. We must respond to him, interact with him. We must know him.

Romans 1:15 So I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome. 16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. 17 For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith, as it is written, “The righteous shall live by faith.” 18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. 19 For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. 20 For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. 21 For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Claiming to be wise, they became fools, 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images resembling mortal man and birds and animals and creeping things. 24 Therefore God gave them up in the lusts of their hearts to impurity, to the dishonoring of their bodies among themselves, 25 because they exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever! Amen. 26 For this reason God gave them up to dishonorable passions. For their women exchanged natural relations for those that are contrary to nature; 27 and the men likewise gave up natural relations with women and were consumed with passion for one another, men committing shameless acts with men and receiving in themselves the due penalty for their error. 28 And since they did not see fit to acknowledge God, God gave them up to a debased mind to do what ought not to be done. 29 They were filled with all manner of unrighteousness, evil, covetousness, malice. They are full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, maliciousness. They are gossips, 30 slanderers, haters of God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, 31 foolish, faithless, heartless, ruthless. 32 Though they know God’s righteous decree that those who practice such things deserve to die, they not only do them but give approval to those who practice them.

In Romans 1, Paul tells us he is eager to preach the gospel to the believers of Rome. He is eager to preach the gospel because it is the power of God for salvation to believers. But salvation from what? What do we need to be rescued from? Verse 18 tells us – the wrath of God is revealed from heaven. That sounds pretty serious. If you were entering a courtroom because you had been charged with a serious crime which you had in fact committed, that would be cause for great concern. But if, as you were being escorted into the courtroom, the guard leaned over to you and said ‘watch out, the wrath of the judge toward you is about to be revealed’, what would you be feeling? That sounds personal! What is God so angry about? Why is he preparing to unleash the full fury of his wrath from heaven?

It is against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men. Ungodliness [ἀσέβεια] is a lack of reverence or awe toward God, a lack of reverential fear. Unrighteousness [ἀδικία] is injustice, violating what is right, dealing fraudulently with others. In what way are we unjust, going against what is right? We are not left to wonder. By our unrighteousness we suppress the truth. It is wrong to hold back, to restrain, to hinder truth. But what truth? Is it truth in general? Or is it a specific kind of truth that God is enraged when we suppress it?

It is ‘the truth’. He tells us in verse 19 that the truth we are condemned for suppressing is ‘what can be known about God’. This implies that there are some things that cannot be known about God. We will never know everything about our infinite Creator. There are some things that are past finding out. We are not held responsible for what we cannot know. But this also tells us that there are things that we can know, that we must know, and that we will be held accountable for knowing. What can be known is plain. God has shown us what we can know about him, what he wants us to know about him, what he expects us to know about him. And he will hold us accountable for what we do with what he has made known. He lists his ‘invisible attributes, his eternal power and divine nature’ as things we must know about him. His divine wrath is revealed against those who suppress this knowledge of him.

He warns in verse 21 of those who know God but do not honor him as God or give him thanks. So not only is it essential that we know about him, but that we respond to him in ways appropriate to his character and nature. The consequences of not responding to him in ways appropriate to his majesty and greatness are grave. Our thinking will become futile, empty, worthless, and our hearts will become foolish and dark.

In verse 23 he says we exchange the glory of the immortal God for images of things he has made. In verse 25 he says we exchange the truth about God for a lie and worship and serve created things rather than the Creator. In verse 28, we do not see fit to acknowledge God. So the right response to knowing God as he really is must be to acknowledge him for who he is, to give him the honor and thanks that is due, to worship and serve him. In other words, we are to know God as he really is and to live in a manner consistent with what we know. Right knowledge of God must lead to right humble worship. If we truly see him for who he is, our hearts will be overwhelmed and overflow in genuine worship of him.

Practical Atheism

Stephen Charnock in the 1600’s spent a good deal of time talking about what he called ‘practical atheism’ in reference to the knowledge of God. True, all who claim to be Christians would agree that God exists and most would even be able to tell you quite a bit about what they believe he is like. But many who claim to be followers of Jesus live the better part of each week as if God did not exist. Charnock wrote:

Actions are a greater discovery of a principle than words. The testimony of works is louder and clearer than that of words; and the frame of men’s hearts must be measured rather by what they do than by what they say. There may be a mighty distance between the tongue and the heart …Who can deny an atheism in the heart, when so much is visible in the life ? [1682; Charnock, Existence & Attributes, Discourse 2]

We honor him with our lips, but our hearts are far from him (Is.29:13). We claim to believe in God, but we live as if he were not there.

Look at what this refusal to practically acknowledge God leads to. Romans 1:29-31 says:

Romans 1:29 They were filled with all manner of unrighteousness, evil, covetousness, malice. They are full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, maliciousness. They are gossips, 30 slanderers, haters of God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, 31 foolish, faithless, heartless, ruthless.

The gospel is the remedy. Paul was eager to preach the gospel because it is the power of God for salvation – salvation from the lack of reverential fear toward God; salvation from our fraudulent dealing with God; salvation from suppressing the truth about him by our actions and incurring his just wrath.

Good News About God

The gospel is more than a message about forgiveness of sins. It is that indeed, but it is more. Forgiveness of sins is a means to a greater end. The gospel is not merely good news about how to escape from hell, although that is very good news. The gospel is more than a message. The gospel is a person. The gospel is about God. Paul speaks in 1 Timothy about

1 Timothy 1:11 …the gospel of the glory of the blessed God with which I have been entrusted.

The gospel of the glory of the blessed God. We could rephrase that ‘the good news of the radiance of the happy God.’ The good news is about the glory of God. The good news is that God is glorious beyond our comprehension, and God is overflowing with delight. He is blessed or happy.

In Romans 3:21-26, at the very heart of the gospel is a display of the righteous character of God.

Romans 3:21 But now the righteousness of God has been manifested… 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. … 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, 25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, … 26 It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.

The gospel at its core is a message about God, God’s glory, God’s righteousness, how we as sinners can be changed so that we may enjoy God without God compromising his own character.

In 2 Corinthians, Paul talks about our great enemy seeking to blind people to the gospel.

2 Corinthians 4:4 In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.

Notice how he describes the gospel: it is light, and it is good news of the glory of Christ, and Christ is the perfect representation of God. The gospel is light about the character and nature, the glory of God. Our enemy wants to prevent us from seeing God for who he is. He goes on to describe how God himself overcomes this satanic blindness.

2 Corinthians 4:6 For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

In the gospel, God gives us the light of the knowledge of the glory of God as seen most clearly through Christ. The gospel shows us who God is.

Peter puts God at the center of the gospel.

1 Peter 3:18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit,

Christ’s suffering was for a purpose. He suffered for our sins, but the purpose was ‘that he might bring us to God’. The goal of the gospel is not to have a better life now or to escape from our sins or to go to heaven when we die, but ‘that he might bring us to God’. The goal of the gospel is that everything that prevents us from enjoying God is taken out of the way so that we can have a right relationship with him.

We are told in the gospels that Jesus proclaimed ‘the gospel of the kingdom’; good news about the domain of the King. He said:

Mark 1:15 and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.”

The climax of history has arrived, the rule of God is here; turn and embrace the good news. The good news about the reign of God. The good news is that God has made a way so that we will not be destroyed when God establishes his rightful rule, but rather that we can enjoy him forever.

Jesus defined eternal life this way:

John 17:3 And this is eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.

Eternal life, the gift that God gives to all who trust Jesus, is a relationship. Eternal life is defined by knowing God and knowing Jesus. This is really what the whole Bible is about. The Bible is God’s revelation; it is him revealing himself to us, telling us who he is, showing us through his historical interactions with people, what he is like.

Becoming by Beholding

We desperately need to see God for who he is. We need to respond to him in ways appropriate to his majesty and glory. We need to allow God to open our eyes to see the light of the knowledge of the glory of God. We need to take time to look. Take time to perceive the glory of the Lord. Take time to enjoy him. And this will change us.

2 Corinthians 3:18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

This beholding the glory of the Lord will begin to transform us. It has been said that you become like the person you most admire. When we spend time admiring God, standing in awe of God, enjoying God, we begin to reflect his image. We begin to be who we were created to be, to enjoy and display his glory. Slightly, imperfectly, little by little, as we spend time in his presence, we are transformed. We all fall short of the glory of God. We fall short of bearing his image, the glory of his infinite perfections. But as we stand in his presence, we begin to bear his image once again.

A Prayer of Longing

May our souls resonate with Psalm 63.

Psalm 63:1 O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you; my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land where there is no water. 2 So I have looked upon you in the sanctuary, beholding your power and glory. 3 Because your steadfast love is better than life, my lips will praise you. 4 So I will bless you as long as I live; in your name I will lift up my hands. 5 My soul will be satisfied as with fat and rich food, and my mouth will praise you with joyful lips, 6 when I remember you upon my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night; 7 for you have been my help, and in the shadow of your wings I will sing for joy. 8 My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me.

Create in us a hunger for knowing you God! Give us a desperate passion to know you. Let us not be satisfied with knowing about you, but really knowing you; enjoying intimacy with you; standing in awe of you, worshiping you! Give us an insatiable appetite to behold your glory. Open our minds to grasp the truths about you that you have revealed to us, and open our hearts to love what we see. May you be to us the sweetest of pleasures. Let us taste and see that you are indeed good. Give us an acute awareness of your nearness, your presence. Let us live every moment of every day with a consciousness of you, and an eager desire in everything to please you.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

August 17, 2015 Posted by | Knowing God, podcast, Theology | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Exodus 34:28-35; The Fading Glory of the Old Covenant

http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20121014_exodus34_28-35.mp3

10/14 Exodus 34:28-35 The Fading Glory of the Old Covenant

28 So he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights. He neither ate bread nor drank water. And he wrote on the tablets the words of the covenant, the Ten Commandments. 29 When Moses came down from Mount Sinai, with the two tablets of the testimony in his hand as he came down from the mountain, Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God. 30 Aaron and all the people of Israel saw Moses, and behold, the skin of his face shone, and they were afraid to come near him. 31 But Moses called to them, and Aaron and all the leaders of the congregation returned to him, and Moses talked with them. 32 Afterward all the people of Israel came near, and he commanded them all that the LORD had spoken with him in Mount Sinai. 33 And when Moses had finished speaking with them, he put a veil over his face. 34 Whenever Moses went in before the LORD to speak with him, he would remove the veil, until he came out. And when he came out and told the people of Israel what he was commanded, 35 the people of Israel would see the face of Moses, that the skin of Moses’ face was shining. And Moses would put the veil over his face again, until he went in to speak with him.

Let’s find our place in the story. The people had sinned. They had broken God’s covenant while Moses was up on the mountain receiving the written terms of the covenant. God was ready to destroy them, but Moses interceded, asking God to show mercy to his people. God relented from his intention to consume them all, but when Moses came down the mountain and saw with his own eyes what had happened, he did what he could to clean up the mess and purge the evil from the camp. About 3,000 men of the people were killed. The LORD announced a disastrous word, that he would no longer go with the people. They would enter the promised land, but without his presence. God is holy and he would be provoked to destroy this persistently rebellious people. The people mourned and took off their ornaments and waited to see what God would do with them. Moses went outside the camp to a temporary tent of meeting, where God met with him. Moses begged that God restore the people to their privileged position and restore his presence to the people. God agreed, and invited Moses up on the mountain to remake the covenant and reveal himself to Moses. According to our text, Moses has now been on the mountain another 40 days, a repeat of the first time, when Israel under Aaron’s leadership made a golden bull idol and held a feast to it and gave their worship to it. But this time, the people are not celebrating the works of their hands; they are mourning, repentant, waiting to hear what God would do with them. We have been in on what has gone on at the top of the mountain, that God revealed his character as a God gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in loving kindness and covenant faithfulness, eager to forgive all kinds of sin. But the people have not heard this yet. They await Moses’ return.

Horns of Moses

Last time Moses returned, his authority was undermined, there was a coup in the camp; the people had broken loose. He brought down two stone tablets, publicly shattered them, ordered the cleansing of the camp, pulverized their idol and made them drink it. This time he is coming down the mountain carrying new tablets, but this time something bizarre is happening. Everyone is terrified and all keep their distance. Something is happening with the skin of Moses’ face. Most of our English translations use words like ‘shining’ or ‘radiant’ to describe what the Israelites saw. The word translated ‘shone’ in verses 29, 30 and 35 is a word that only shows up one other time in the Old Testament; in Psalm 69 it is a verbal noun that means ‘horns’.

Psalm 69:31 This will please the LORD more than an ox or a bull with horns and hoofs.

Jerome’s Latin Vulgate (completed around AD 400) translated this as ‘his face was horned’. Because of this, much of the Medieval and Renaissance artwork portrayed Moses with horns.

This word seems to be the root of the word commonly translated as ‘horns’. Horns in biblical times represented strength, power or authority. So whatever the actual physical or visual phenomena, the word used to describe it carried the idea of authority, God restoring his authority to his mediator Moses. Habakkuk uses the related word for horns in what seems to be a very figurative way.

Habakkuk 3:3 God came from Teman, and the Holy One from Mount Paran. His splendor covered the heavens, and the earth was full of his praise. Selah 4 His brightness was like the light; rays flashed from his hand; and there he veiled his power.

(AV Habakkuk 3:4 And his brightness was as the light; he had horns coming out of his hand: and there was the hiding of his power)

Whatever this looked like, it was God’s way of displaying ‘this is my servant Moses – listen to him. He is my chosen mediator. He carries my authority’. They were terrified.

True Humility

A very interesting note is that Moses had no idea what was going on. Everyone is freaking out because of what’s going on with Moses’ face, and he is totally unaware that his appearance is altered.

29 …Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God.

Moses had spent 40 days in the presence of God. He was changed. He didn’t eat or drink in 40 days. But he didn’t come down the mountain saying ‘look at me! Isn’t this cool? Do you notice something different about me? I’ve been in the presence of God!’ Moses is so fixated on the glory of God, on seeing and knowing God for who he is, that he’s lost sight of himself. This is true greatness. This is true humility. Not drawing attention to the evidence of God’s work in my life, and not drawing negative attention to how low and miserable and humble I am. True humility is simply not putting self on display at all. Self-awareness is lost as God takes center stage. This is the freedom that comes from focusing on God, enjoying God, being in awe of God so much that although I am being changed in the process, I am blissfully unaware of myself at all.

Good News

The people are mourning and afraid, waiting to find out what God will do with them, and their mediator comes down the mountain with a terrifying appearance. Moses has to call Aaron and the leaders of Israel to come back to him so he can talk with them, and they have to convince the people that it is safe to come near Moses. Once they are finally gathered, he can communicate what God had told him on the mountain

30 Aaron and all the people of Israel saw Moses, and behold, the skin of his face shone, and they were afraid to come near him. 31 But Moses called to them, and Aaron and all the leaders of the congregation returned to him, and Moses talked with them. 32 Afterward all the people of Israel came near, and he commanded them all that the LORD had spoken with him in Mount Sinai.

This would include the re-iteration of God’s ten words. This would include God’s self revelation:

Exodus 34:6 The LORD passed before him and proclaimed, “The LORD, the LORD, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, 7 keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.”

This would include God’s promise:

Exodus 34:10 And he said, “Behold, I am making a covenant. Before all your people I will do marvels, such as have not been created in all the earth or in any nation. And all the people among whom you are shall see the work of the LORD, for it is an awesome thing that I will do with you.

Finally, the people hear God’s answer to their question. Could they be forgiven? Would God abandon them? This was a repeat in miniature of the terror they had experienced when the mountain was on fire and God thundered out his expectations to them. Now Moses’ face was on fire and they were terrified with overflowing joy as he repeated the words of God’s covenant with them.

Transfigured

It is interesting that Moses shows up again centuries later on another mountain with another mediator whose appearance was altered after spending time with God. Jesus, who

Isaiah 53:2 …he had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him. 3 He was despised and rejected by men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief; and as one from whom men hide their faces he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

This Jesus

Luke 9:28 … took with him Peter and John and James and went up on the mountain to pray. 29 And as he was praying, the appearance of his face was altered, and his clothing became dazzling white. 30 And behold, two men were talking with him, Moses and Elijah, 31 who appeared in glory and spoke of his departure [exodus], which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. 32 Now Peter and those who were with him were heavy with sleep, but when they became fully awake they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him. 33 And as the men were parting from him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah”––not knowing what he said. 34 As he was saying these things, a cloud came and overshadowed them, and they were afraid as they entered the cloud. 35 And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, “This is my Son, my Chosen One; listen to him!” 36 And when the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silent and told no one in those days anything of what they had seen. (cf. Matthew 17:1-9; Mark 9:1-9)

The skin of Moses’ face shone because he had been talking with God. But John said of Jesus:

John 1:14 And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. …16 And from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. 17 For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. 18 No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known.

Moses reflected the glory of God. Jesus revealed the glory of God, because Jesus is God. When Peter suggested that they make three tents, one for Jesus, one for Moses, and one for Elijah, He was silenced by the voice “this is my beloved Son, listen to him.” Moses and Elijah and James and John and Peter were all there to see Jesus, to testify to Jesus. Jesus is the one who Moses and all the prophets were pointing to. Jesus said:

Luke 24:44 … that everything written about me in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms must be fulfilled.”

Moses, Elijah, the entire Old Testament was written about Jesus. Jesus said:

John 5:39 You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.

The author of Hebrews points how Jesus is superior in every way to angels, to Moses, to the law, the temple, the priests, the sacrifices, Jesus is the reality of which everything else was foreshadow and type.

Hebrews 1:1 Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, 2 but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world. 3 He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high,

Moses reflected the glory of God. This was only a dim foretaste of what would be seen in Jesus. Jesus is the radiance of the glory of God, the exact imprint of his nature.

The Glory Fades

33 And when Moses had finished speaking with them, he put a veil over his face. 34 Whenever Moses went in before the LORD to speak with him, he would remove the veil, until he came out. And when he came out and told the people of Israel what he was commanded, 35 the people of Israel would see the face of Moses, that the skin of Moses’ face was shining. And Moses would put the veil over his face again, until he went in to speak with him.

According to the text, Moses would veil his face after he spoke to the people. He would remove the veil when he went into the presence of the LORD. He would deliver the message to the people so that they could see the skin of his face shining. Then he would cover himself with the veil until he went again into the presence of the LORD. Paul in 2 Corinthians points to the veiling of Moses’ shining face, and draws a contrast between the Old Covenant and the New. Paul says

2 Corinthians 3:5 …our sufficiency is from God, 6 who has made us competent to be ministers of a new covenant, not of the letter but of the Spirit. For the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life. 7 Now if the ministry of death, carved in letters on stone, came with such glory that the Israelites could not gaze at Moses’ face because of its glory, which was being brought to an end, 8 will not the ministry of the Spirit have even more glory? 9 For if there was glory in the ministry of condemnation, the ministry of righteousness must far exceed it in glory. 10 Indeed, in this case, what once had glory has come to have no glory at all, because of the glory that surpasses it. 11 For if what was being brought to an end came with glory, much more will what is permanent have glory. 12 Since we have such a hope, we are very bold, 13 not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face so that the Israelites might not gaze at the outcome of what was being brought to an end. 14 But their minds were hardened. For to this day, when they read the old covenant, that same veil remains unlifted, because only through Christ is it taken away. 15 Yes, to this day whenever Moses is read a veil lies over their hearts. 16 But when one turns to the Lord, the veil is removed. 17 Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 18 And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

Paul points out that Moses veiled his face because the glory of the Old Covenant, as brilliant as that was, was a fading glory. It did not last. He draws a number of contrasts between the Old Covenant and the New:

Old Covenant / New Covenant

Of The Letter / Of The Spirit

Kills / Gives Life

Ministry of Death Ministry of Spirit

Carved in Stone / Written in Hearts

Fading Glory / Surpassing Glory

Hidden / Revealed

Ministry of Condemnation / Ministry of Righteousness

Ending / Permanent

Minds Hardened / Veil Removed Through Christ

We look at what happened to Moses and are intrigued. Wouldn’t that be cool if we all left church each Sunday with radiating faces? But Paul’s point is that what Moses experienced under the Old Covenant was as nothing compared to what what we now have in the New Covenant. Moses, a man, was their mediator. Jesus, the God-man is our one mediator. Moses was the only one invited in to God’s presence. We all have the opportunity to behold the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. We get to look, not at Moses, but at Jesus, God the Son, and we get to look with unveiled faces. We are not hid in a cleft of the rock and covered with his hand, able to see only his back side. We experience the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

Transformed by Beholding

We, like Moses are altered from the experience. But for Moses it faded away. For us it is permanent. Are you hungry for lasting transformation in you life? In your character? In your relationships? In your attitudes? In your thoughts and desires? Here is the answer for permanent transformation. It is not something we do; transformation is something that is done to us; we are ‘being transformed’. What is the mechanism of transformation? How does it happen? ‘Beholding the glory of the Lord’, we look, we gaze, we see, and we are being transformed. We turn to the Lord, the veil is removed, and we take in who Jesus is. We enjoy him in all his glory, full of grace and truth. As we look God transforms us. We may not be aware that anything is happening. We can lose ourselves in the glory of his majesty. But those around us will know. They will see it in our lives.

Exodus 34:10 …And all the people among whom you are shall see the work of the LORD, for it is an awesome thing that I will do with you.

They will recognize that we have been with Jesus (Acts 4:13).

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

October 14, 2012 Posted by | Exodus, podcast | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment