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Preaching from the Pulpit of Ephraim Church of the Bible

2 Corinthians 11:16-21; The Character of False Teachers

11/15_2 Corinthians 11:16-21; The Character of False Teachers; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20201115_2cor11_16-21.mp3

Paul is confronting the false apostles head on. And he is confronting the church for following them. He’s said (11:4) that they proclaim another Jesus, a different spirit, a different gospel, and the church is bearing with it well! He labels the so-called super-apostles as false apostles, deceitful workers, servants of Satan who disguise themselves as genuine but their works and their future judgment expose them as false. He warns the church that he fears for them, that they are in danger of being deceived by Satan to forfeit a simple relationship with Jesus for a counterfeit.

But some in this church have already been taken. They believe everything the false teachers tell them, which means that they question Paul’s authenticity and doubt his integrity. Paul is willing to ‘become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some’ (1Cor.9:22).

A Lamb in Wolves Clothing

The wisdom of Proverbs says:

Proverbs 26:4 Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest you be like him yourself. 5 Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own eyes.

Paul is willing to be thought a fool if that is what it takes to get their attention, to point out their folly and call them back to single-hearted devotion to the real Jesus. The Corinthians are wise in their own eyes, and need a little humbling.

He said in verse 1 of this chapter:

2 Corinthians 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me!

And then (11:7-15) he boasted about humbling himself by serving them free of charge. Here in verse 16, he comes back to ask permission to do some foolish boasting.

2 Corinthians 11:16 I repeat, let no one think me foolish. But even if you do, accept me as a fool, so that I too may boast a little. 17 What I am saying with this boastful confidence, I say not as the Lord would but as a fool. 18 Since many boast according to the flesh, I too will boast. 19 For you gladly bear with fools, being wise yourselves! 20 For you bear it if someone makes slaves of you, or devours you, or takes advantage of you, or puts on airs, or strikes you in the face. 21 To my shame, I must say, we were too weak for that! But whatever anyone else dares to boast of—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast of that.

Paul is willing to be considered a fool for Christ’s sake (1Cor.4:10), to let them think they are wise, if that is what it takes to reach them.

Paul has just exposed the false teachers for who they are, wolves in sheep’s clothing. Paul is now willing to be a lamb in wolves clothing if they will put up with him that way, but he lifts up the disguise and tells them in advance that is what he is doing.

According to the Flesh, Not the Lord

Paul is about to launch into what he considers foolish boasting, and he makes it clear that what he says, he says ‘not according to the Lord’, because many are boasting according to the flesh. Back in 1:17 they were accusing Paul of making his plans according to the flesh, and in 10:2 some suspect him of walking according to the flesh. But, he says

2 Corinthians 10:3 For though we walk in the flesh, we are not waging war according to the flesh. 4 For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh but have divine power to destroy strongholds.

Here he contrasts boasting according to the flesh with speaking according to the Lord. More often (Rom.8:4-5, 12-13; Gal.4:23, 29) Paul juxtaposes living or walking according to the flesh with living or walking according to the Spirit. But here he contrasts speaking in line with the way the Lord would speak against boasting after the manner of the flesh, after a merely human, worldly pattern. This is the way unbelieving people boast, and it is foolish. It is not the way Jesus taught me to speak. “Our Lord was no boaster, and his Spirit does not lead any one to boast” [Hodge, p.266]. Carson writes: “Although no one ever made higher claims for himself than did Jesus, he uttered those claims not as a mortal vainly striving for equality with God, but as the self-emptied Son bent on the business of bringing salvation to condemned sinners” (Carson, p.109-110]. Jesus taught us wisdom that is not of this world, indeed contrary to the principles of this world.

In chapter 10, Paul refused to boast beyond limits, but only in what the Lord had assigned to him. He says

2 Corinthians 10:17 “Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.” (cf. 1Cor.1:31)

Citing Jeremiah 9

Jeremiah 9:23 Thus says the LORD: “Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, 24 but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the LORD who practices steadfast love, justice, and righteousness in the earth. For in these things I delight, declares the LORD.”

Speaking according to the Lord is boasting in the Lord. Alone. He is about to boast in verse 22 in his own ethnic heritage, language, culture and religious upbringing. But this is foolish fleshly boasting, and he wants us all to know that it is not speaking as the Lord would speak. It is not boasting only in the cross. It is according to the flesh, and it is folly.

Bearing With Abusive Leadership

Verses 19-20 are in several ways parallel to verse 4. He frames both sections with an ‘if’; if one comes, if someone does these things, as is actually happening, you put up with it. You bear it well, even gladly.

Verse 4 exposes the false teaching of the false apostles. He pulls back the disguise and shows them that they come preaching another Jesus, not the Jesus the apostles proclaimed, a different spirit, one you did not receive, a different gospel which you did not accept.

Verse 19 is a slap in the face, saying sarcastically that you are so wise that you gladly bear with fools. And in verse 20 he exposes the corrosive character of the false apostles. You put up with it if someone enslaves you, if someone devours, if someone takes, if someone self-exalts, if someone strikes your face. This is the abuse they were gladly bearing with.

Notice, Paul is not directly rebuking the false apostles. He is rebuking the church for embracing and following and supporting bad leaders. Bad leaders can’t lead if no one will follow them, if no one will support them. He already said in verse 15 ‘Their end will correspond to their deeds’, both the end of the false teachers and those who follow them. God will judge the false apostles. But the Corinthians should know better than to follow them. They should recognize them by their fruits, and their character is rotten to the core. They are enslaving you, devouring, taking, self-exalting, striking you the face. And you are putting up with it!

Enslaving You

No one can serve two masters (Mt.6:24). Paul says in Romans 6 that you are slaves to the one you obey. He said:

2 Corinthians 1:24 Not that we lord it over your faith, but we work with you for your joy, for you stand firm in your faith.

Paul stands in stark contrast to these servants of Satan who are taking them captive to serve themselves. Paul will not bully or domineer them, but instead he pursues their genuine joy as he has betrothed them to one husband, to Christ (11:2). He said:

2 Corinthians 4:5 For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake.

Where the false teachers fight for the position of lord over them, Paul is glad to humble himself to serve them for the Lord’s sake.

Devouring

False teachers devour. Fire devours. The satanic birds in Jesus’ parable devour the gospel seed so it can’t take root (Lk.8:5) The hypocritical scribes and Pharisees devour widow’s houses (Lk.20:47), and the prodigal son devoured his father’s property with prostitutes (Lk.15:30). The false teachers make a practice of parasitic violence and exploitation. Sam Storms writes:

“True, godly, Spirit-filled leaders don’t exist for you to serve them. They exist to serve you! This was the precedent set by Jesus who said of himself that he ‘came not to be served but to serve’ (Matt.28:20). Leaders aren’t placed in the body of Christ so that their reputation, lifestyle, and bank account can increase at the expense of those who are led. Leaders lead so that those led might be ever more conformed to the image of Christ. And if such comes only at great cost to those in authority, so be it, for Jesus served his own by giving ‘his life as a ransom for many’ (Matt.28:20).” [Storms, p.164];

Taking

False teachers take advantage. To take or to receive is a very common word used in lots of positive and neutral contexts. But it can also be used in negative contexts for a violent seizing, as in Jesus’ parable of the tenants who took the master’s servants

Mattthew 21:35 And the tenants took his servants and beat one, killed another, and stoned another.

And when he sent his own son,

Matthew 21:39 And they took him and threw him out of the vineyard and killed him.

Here it is used in the context of the false apostles seizing or laying hands on or taking advantage of. Paul used this word in verse 8 of robbing other churches by taking support from them. In 12:16 it is translated ‘got the better of you’; he is accused of cunning, taking them by deceit.

2 Corinthians 12:16 But granting that I myself did not burden you, I was crafty, you say, and got the better of you by deceit.

Self-exalting

The false apostles lift themselves up. They put on airs, they arrogantly boast. In the last chapter (10:5) Paul said he wages spiritual warfare tearing down every high thing that exalts itself against the knowledge of God.

Isaiah 2:11 The haughty looks of man shall be brought low, and the lofty pride of men shall be humbled, and the LORD alone will be exalted in that day. 12 For the LORD of hosts has a day against all that is proud and lofty, against all that is lifted up—and it shall be brought low;

Striking You in the Face

Paul says they even go so far as to strike you in the face. Jesus used this word when one of the officers of the high priest struck him with his hand (Jn.18:23), and those holding Jesus in Jewish custody were mocking and beating him (Lk.22:63).

Most today take this as “almost certainly metaphorical language to refer to any kind of humiliating treatment” [Carson, p.111]. Except we know ‘religious leaders of the day at times punished offenders by slapping them’ [Guthrie, BECNT p.541] (cf. Acts 23:2).

And we see today’s false teachers who have people come forward so they can strike them on the face or push them to knock them down, allegedly ‘slaying them with the spirit’.

This puts what Paul said back in chapter 7 in context;

2 Corinthians 7:2 Make room in your hearts for us. We have wronged no one, we have corrupted no one, we have taken advantage of no one.

You gladly bear with fools who enslave you, who devour, who seize, who self-exalt, who strike you in the face. This is a ‘stunning disclosure of the aggressive authoritarianism and overbearing leadership tactics of the intruders.’ [Storms, p.163]

Shame and Weakness

2 Corinthians 11:16 I repeat, let no one think me foolish. But even if you do, accept me as a fool, so that I too may boast a little. 17 What I am saying with this boastful confidence, I say not as the Lord would but as a fool. 18 Since many boast according to the flesh, I too will boast. 19 For you gladly bear with fools, being wise yourselves! 20 For you bear it if someone makes slaves of you, or devours you, or takes advantage of you, or puts on airs, or strikes you in the face. 21 To my shame, I must say, we were too weak for that!

Paul has exposed the corrupt character of the false apostles. The Corinthians should be ashamed that they had been duped and taken advantage of, abused and shamefully treated. But Paul takes the shame on himself. It is his to his shame, he says sarcastically, that he was too weak to take advantage of them in that way. He was too weak to bully them, to lord it over them, to forcefully domineer. He was weak with the meekness and gentleness, the humility of Christ (10:1). He shows by his example that weakness is the way.

Matthew 20:28 even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Paul is weak, and he will go on to boast in his weakness, because it is the path of following Jesus.

Fool’s Boldness

2 Corinthians 11:21 …But whatever anyone else dares to boast of—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast of that.

Even in Paul’s weakness and dishonor, he is bold. In whatever someone is bold he is also bold. And he qualifies this; he is speaking foolishness. He said back in

2 Corinthians 10:2 I beg of you that when I am present I may not have to show boldness with such confidence as I count on showing against some who suspect us of walking according to the flesh.

Paul is weak, he begs that he will not have to show the boldness he fears he will have to show when he visits. He says in 10:12

2 Corinthians 10:12 Not that we dare to classify or compare ourselves with some of those who are commending themselves. But when they measure themselves by one another and compare themselves with one another, they are without understanding.

He isn’t bold enough, he doesn’t dare to measure himself by others. Those who do, he says, are without understanding. Here he foolishly dares to boast of whatever another dares to boast of. He is willing to put on the wolf’s clothing in order to show that he is not in the least inferior (11:5), yet in his heart he is harmless as a dove (Mt.10:16).

Paul puts on the wolf’s clothing to caricature the wolves, to expose their character and wake up the sheep to set them free from their clutches.

Matthew 7:15 “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves.

Matthew 10:16 “Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves.

***

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 18, 2020 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2 Corinthians 11:13-15; Deceptive Transformation

11/08_2 Corinthians 11:13-15; Deceptive Transformation; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20201108_2cor11_13-15.mp3

Done Beating around the Bush…

In 2 Corinthians Paul paints a picture of what authentic gospel ministry looks like and smells like and walks like. Authentic ministry is ministry that follows in the footsteps of Jesus and is patterned after his sacrifice for the good of others.

In chapter 10 he began to point out more directly the character of those who were leading the Corinthians astray. He contrasted his own Christlike meekness and gentleness with their boldness; he said he wages war with divine power to demolish spiritual strongholds. His authority was given to build them up not tear them down. His opponents were classifying and comparing and commending themselves. They measured themselves by one another. And they boasted in the labor of another.

In chapter 11 he warns them that he is going to come out to play and meet the false teachers on their own boastful turf, and he tells them why.

2 Corinthians 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me! 2 For I feel a divine jealousy for you, since I betrothed you to one husband, to present you as a pure virgin to Christ. 3 But I am afraid that as the serpent deceived Eve by his cunning, your thoughts will be led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ. 4 For if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough.

Here in chapter 11 he becomes much more direct in pointing out the problem. He says that he betrothed them to one husband, Christ. But the Corinthians were under a satanic deception, being led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ to receive a different spirit, a different gospel, a different Jesus.

2 Corinthians 11:5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. 6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

He is accused of contemptible speech. Here he ironically calls these skillful speakers ‘super-apostles’, but says that he does not come up short in his knowledge.

2 Corinthians 11:7 Or did I commit a sin in humbling myself so that you might be exalted, because I preached God’s gospel to you free of charge? 8 I robbed other churches by accepting support from them in order to serve you. 9 And when I was with you and was in need, I did not burden anyone, for the brothers who came from Macedonia supplied my need. So I refrained and will refrain from burdening you in any way. 10 As the truth of Christ is in me, this boasting of mine will not be silenced in the regions of Achaia. 11 And why? Because I do not love you? God knows I do! 12 And what I am doing I will continue to do, in order to undermine the claim of those who would like to claim that in their boasted mission they work on the same terms as we do.

In verses 7-12 he undercuts their claim to work on equal terms with him, because he refuses to be a burden, he refuses to take any money from them for himself, where these ‘super-apostles’ were clearly in it for the money. Paul forces their hand; if they want to claim they work on his terms, they will have to give up taking money from the Corinthians, something Paul is confident they will not do.

Calling a Spade

Everything Paul has said so far should have led them to draw this conclusion, but in case anyone missed it, here in verses 13-15 he directly labels the super-apostles for who they really are.

2 Corinthians 11:13 For such men are false apostles, deceitful workmen, disguising themselves as apostles of Christ. 14 And no wonder, for even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light. 15 So it is no surprise if his servants, also, disguise themselves as servants of righteousness. Their end will correspond to their deeds.

In the previous verses, he labeled them ‘super-apostles’. Here he calls them false apostles, deceitful workers, servants of Satan. This is even more confrontational, more in-your-face than what he said to the Galatian churches. He said:

Galatians 1:6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel— 7 not that there is another one, but there are some who trouble you and want to distort the gospel of Christ. 8 But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. 9 As we have said before, so now I say again: If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed.

He warns that even if an apostle or an angel from heaven brought to them a different gospel, they should not accept it. But here he directly labels his opponents as false apostles, deceitful workers, servants of Satan.

False and Deceptive

Paul has carefully laid out the character of a genuine apostle, and now he points the finger and says your so-called super apostles are not it. They are false. They are phony. They are liars. They are workers of deceit, using bait to entrap, they are crafty, employing trickery. They are not transparent. What you see is not what you get. They hide their true character behind a disguise.

Paul has shown that they proclaim another Jesus a different gospel and a different spirit. If they are apostles of a false Jesus, preaching a false gospel, then they are false apostles. They were not commissioned by the real Jesus and they are not testifying to who Jesus truly is. No matter how well they say what they say, the content of what they say condemns them.

The Danger of Appearances

Paul has already rebuked the Corinthians for looking at appearances and not at the heart (5:12; 10:7). Here he pulls off their clever disguise. The false apostles go to great lengths to transform themselves into apostles of Christ. But only Jesus can bring true inner transformation. That’s how Paul uses this word in Philippians 3

Philippians 3:20 But our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, 21 who will transform our lowly body to be like his glorious body, by the power that enables him even to subject all things to himself.

The transformation of the false apostles is in form, not in substance. And Paul is not surprised.

2 Corinthians 11:13 For such men are false apostles, deceitful workmen, disguising [transforming] themselves as apostles of Christ. 14 And no wonder, for even Satan disguises [transforms] himself as an angel of light. 15 So it is no surprise if his servants, also, disguise [transform] themselves as servants of righteousness. Their end will correspond to their deeds.

The servant does what his master does. Paul has shown this in genuine apostles, who follow in the footsteps of their suffering Savior. This is also true of false apostles, who are servants of Satan. He pulls off the mask and says ‘even Satan transforms himself as an angel of light.’ ‘The great dragon, …that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world’ (Rev.12:9). You are not going to catch a whiff of sulfur or the glint of a pitchfork in his red cloven hoof. He is called the dragon and the serpent, but he is not going to appear like one. Few who recognize him for who he is will listen to his lies.

He didn’t convince Eve to eat the forbidden fruit by telling her that it was foul smelling and rotten and would plunge her into ruin and sever her relationship with a good Creator who loves her. He convinced her that it was ‘good for food, …a delight to the eyes, and …to be desired to make one wise,’ and that God was withholding something good from her (Gen.3:4-6).

Jesus called him ‘a liar and the father of lies’ (Jn.8:44), and that applies not only to the content but also to the form. He warned ‘of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves’ (Mt.7:15). They appear to be sheep, but it is a disguise. Satan, Paul says, transforms himself into an angel of light.

‘Do not believe every spirit’, John says, ‘but test the spirits to see whether they are from God, for many false prophets have gone out into the world’ (1Jn.4:1). Test the spirits by the content of their message, not by how they appear. Do they confess the truth about Jesus? Jesus is God come in the flesh, to suffer in our place, to rescue us. Or do they proclaim a distorted Jesus?

Do not judge based on appearances. Isaiah 14 refers to the one who fell from heaven as ‘day star’ or ‘Lucifer,’ a shining one. Ezekiel 28 gives this description:

Ezekiel 28:12 …“You were the signet of perfection, full of wisdom and perfect in beauty. 13 You were in Eden, the garden of God; every precious stone was your covering, sardius, topaz, and diamond, beryl, onyx, and jasper, sapphire, emerald, and carbuncle; and crafted in gold were your settings and your engravings. On the day that you were created they were prepared. 14 You were an anointed guardian cherub. I placed you; you were on the holy mountain of God; in the midst of the stones of fire you walked. 15 You were blameless in your ways from the day you were created, till unrighteousness was found in you. …17 Your heart was proud because of your beauty; you corrupted your wisdom for the sake of your splendor. …

Servants of Righteousness

Do not be deceived by appearances. Do not be deceived by a smooth tongue, by eloquent speech, by lofty arguments. Paul is in a spiritual battle for the souls of people. He is warning them of satanic deception that transforms its servants into servants of righteousness. In the name of Jesus they promote a false Jesus, under the guise of the gospel they proclaim a distorted gospel, and in the power of another spirit they promise present blessing by that spirit.

Paul claimed to be a minister of a new covenant (3:6), ministry of the life-giving Spirit (3:8), the ministry of righteousness (3:9), so that

2 Corinthians 3:18 …we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another…

Transformed in true inner righteousness, not in an outward show of righteousness that is not really righteousness.

So far in 2 Corinthians, we have seen that there is unforgiveness (2:7) and Paul exhorts them to forgive,

2 Corinthians 2:11 so that we would not be outwitted by Satan; for we are not ignorant of his designs.

They were yoked together with unbelievers and idolatry (6:14-16). And they were not pursuing holiness (7:1).

He appeals to them to be reconciled to God (5:20);

2 Corinthians 5:21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

We become truly righteous with God’s own righteousness credited to our account because God credited our sin to Jesus on the cross. Righteousness only comes to us through the substitutionary sacrifice of Jesus for us. The false apostles masquerading as servants of righteousness were not righteous themselves; they were deceitful, disgraceful, cunning, underhanded (4:2), tampering with God’s word. They were not righteous themselves, and their message did not produce righteousness in their converts. They proclaimed a Jesus who didn’t suffer for our sins, a gospel devoid of the power of the cross, a spirit who cannot transform and produce holiness. The did talk about the spirit, the gospel and Jesus, but they twisted those words and filled them with foreign content. On the surface it sounds right, but it is not what it appears.

End Corresponds to Deeds

2 Corinthians 11:13 For such men are false apostles, deceitful workmen, disguising themselves as apostles of Christ. 14 And no wonder, for even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light. 15 So it is no surprise if his servants, also, disguise themselves as servants of righteousness. Their end will correspond to their deeds.

Paul reminds them that God’s Holy Spirit produces the fruit of holiness. As he told the Ephesians:

Ephesians 5:5 For you may be sure of this, that everyone who is sexually immoral or impure, or who is covetous ( that is, an idolater), has no inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and God. 6 Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of these things the wrath of God comes upon the sons of disobedience. 7 Therefore do not become partners with them; 8 for at one time you were darkness, but now you are light in the Lord. Walk as children of light 9 (for the fruit of light is found in all that is good and right and true), 10 and try to discern what is pleasing to the Lord.

Anyone teaching that morality doesn’t matter is deceiving you with empty words. The true gospel is never earned, but it produces heart transformation. The false apostles were promoting a spirit that isn’t holy and can’t produce the fruit of holiness. As Jesus said;

Luke 6:43 “For no good tree bears bad fruit, nor again does a bad tree bear good fruit, 44 for each tree is known by its own fruit. …

Galatians 5:22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. 24 And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.

If the false apostles disguise themselves as servants of righteousness, but in truth are serving Satan and unrighteousness, their eternal end will correspond to who they really are, as it will be with all those who follow their teaching. This is a sobering passage. Paul is warning us that it is essential to guard the purity both of our doctrine and our living. He has ‘betrothed us to one husband, to present us as a pure virgin to Christ’ (11:2). Do not be led astray by satanic seduction from your single-hearted devotion to Christ.

***

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 11, 2020 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2 Corinthians 11:7-12; The Offense of Cultural Sensitivity

11/01_2 Corinthians 11:7-12; The Offense of Cultural Sensitivity; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20201101_2cor11_7-12.mp3

2 Corinthians 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me! 2 For I feel a divine jealousy for you, since I betrothed you to one husband, to present you as a pure virgin to Christ. 3 But I am afraid that as the serpent deceived Eve by his cunning, your thoughts will be led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ. 4 For if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough. 5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. 6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

The Corinthians are enamored by false apostles selling a false gospel which cannot save, empowered by a different spirit, inviting them to follow another Jesus, a Jesus that promises power, prestige, position, but doesn’t require his followers to follow him by taking up their cross.

The false apostles attempted to undermine Paul’s authority in Corinth by pointing to his ‘contemptible speech’ (10:10). Paul answers maybe he doesn’t measure up to their standards of rhetorical style, but his substance is sound, by an open statement of the truth he has made the simple good news message of Christ crucified known to them.

Here in verses 7-12 he answers another objection;

2 Corinthians 11:7 Or did I commit a sin in humbling myself so that you might be exalted, because I preached God’s gospel to you free of charge? 8 I robbed other churches by accepting support from them in order to serve you. 9 And when I was with you and was in need, I did not burden anyone, for the brothers who came from Macedonia supplied my need. So I refrained and will refrain from burdening you in any way. 10 As the truth of Christ is in me, this boasting of mine will not be silenced in the regions of Achaia. 11 And why? Because I do not love you? God knows I do! 12 And what I am doing I will continue to do, in order to undermine the claim of those who would like to claim that in their boasted mission they work on the same terms as we do.

Paul is being criticized for not accepting money from them. Imagine that! In collecting money for the saints in Jerusalem, they suspect him of stealing. But in refusing payment for serving them, they object that his teaching must not be worth anything, or he must not love them. They are attempting to put him in a lose-lose corner.

The Sin of Christ-Likeness

Paul answers with a question. Was it a sin for me to humble myself? Paul had already addressed these issues in 1 Corinthians 9. There he argued that it is the right of a minister of the gospel to make his living by preaching the gospel (1Cor.9:14). He had the right to receive financial support from them for his ministry to them, but he did not make use of that right.

Here he asks, was it sinful for me to humble myself and forego my right as a minister? He wanted to put no stumbling block in the way of the gospel (1Cor.9:12). The culture of Corinth estimated the worth of a teacher by how much they charged, which put the best teachers out of reach of the poor. And those who did support the teacher financially became patrons who expected the allegiance of the teacher in return. Paul would not sell out in this way and become obligated to a few wealthy patrons, and he refused to withhold the gospel from the poor. As he said in 1 Corinthians 9:19, while remaining ‘free from all, I have made myself a slave to all, that I might win more of them.’

Paul humbled himself by not making use of his right to financial support as a minister. He humbled himself in order to lift them up. He humbled himself so that he would be free to proclaim the gospel of God freely to all. He humbled himself so that in a city with no gospel presence, a church could be established in the grace of God. He was willing to go without, so that they could receive the gift of eternal life. He was willing to sacrifice, to suffer, to work with his own hands, so that the gospel would be seen as all of grace, a costly gift freely given to those who can’t earn it and don’t deserve it.

Paul humbled himself because that’s what Jesus did. Jesus, having all the rights of being himself fully God,

Philippians 2:7 but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.

They criticized Paul for not receiving payment from them. He asks, did I commit a sin by humbling myself? Is it a sin to follow Jesus? Was it a sin for Jesus to humble himself in order to save us? Jesus came ‘not to be served but to serve’ (Mk.10:45). Paul once again brings them back to the central message of this letter; that authentic ministry is ministry that follows in the footsteps of Jesus. Authentic ministry is cross-shaped ministry. He clearly exposes the false teachers for calling evil good and good evil. Is Christ-likeness a sin?

Plundering Churches

Paul goes on to confront them with the harsh truth.

2 Corinthians 11:8 I robbed other churches by accepting support from them in order to serve you. 9 And when I was with you and was in need, I did not burden anyone, for the brothers who came from Macedonia supplied my need. So I refrained and will refrain from burdening you in any way.

If they didn’t know it before, he tells them now that he did accept support from other churches. In fact he calls it ‘plunder,’ stripping armor from the corpses of a defeated enemy. He uses graphic imagery to startle them with the costly realities of gospel ministry. Calvin saw this as ‘every thing that Paul took from the Churches that he had gained to Christ was, in a manner, the spoils of his victories, …what they contributed gratuitously was, in a manner, due by right of spiritual warfare.’ [Calvin, p.347]

Acts 18 tells us that he arrived alone in Corinth, and soon met Aquila and Priscilla, and worked with them in the menial trade of tentmaking to support himself while he preached each Sabbath, until his co-workers Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia with support to free him to spend more time proclaiming Jesus.

He has already championed the churches of Macedonia who out of their extreme poverty overflowed in abundant single-hearted devotion and gave beyond their ability (2Cor.8:1-3) to the relief of the saints.

Now he lets them know that these impoverished and persecuted churches gave support to him while he was serving in the relatively affluent city of Corinth.

To one of these afflicted Macedonian churches, in the city of Philippi, he writes of their ‘partnership in the gospel from the first day until now’ (Phil.1:5). He writes:

Philippians 4:15 And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only. 16 Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again.

This was a slap in the face to Corinth. Paul considered it less a risk to the gospel to plunder the poverty-stricken churches of Macedonia than to accept support from the affluent Corinthians.

Partnering to Pay the Gospel Forward

When Paul entered a new region, he refused support to prevent them thinking that they were paying a fee for the gospel. After a church was established, he allowed them to then partner with him in advancing the gospel on to the next area. In chapter 8 He is encouraging the Corinthians to participate in the relief of the poor Jerusalem saints, and it seems from 2 Corinthians 10:15-16 that he was willing for the Corinthians to partner with him in advancing the gospel to regions beyond them (cf. Rom.15:24, 28; 1Cor.16:5-6; 2Cor.1:15-16).

The Truth of Christ In Me

But he was insistent that he will not change his practice with them. He kept himself from being a burden to them, and he will continue to keep himself from ever burdening them.

As we learned from the Macedonians in chapter 8, when one truly understands and receives God’s grace, giving is no longer a burden but a delight. Their abundance of joy overflowed in a wealth of single-hearted devotion, and they gave beyond their means, ‘begging us earnestly for the grace of taking part in the fellowship of the saints’ (2Cor.8:2-4).

Paul here takes an oath before God.

2 Corinthians 11:9 …So I refrained and will refrain from burdening you in any way. 10 As the truth of Christ is in me, this boasting of mine will not be silenced in the regions of Achaia.

This is an oath formula; Paul promised them he would enter into foolish boasting. Here he boasts that he has not and will not be a burden to them. He connects this boast of not being a burden to the truth of Christ in him. There may be more to this than a simple oath; ‘I swear by the truth of Christ.’ The truth of Christ is in Paul not merely in word, but also in deed. As he said back in chapter 8,

2 Corinthians 8:9 For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich.

Paul proclaimed the truth of Christ. But he also lived the truth of Christ. The truth of Christ lived in him. He lived among them ‘as poor, yet making many rich’ (2Cor.6:10)

He humbled himself ‘so that you might be exalted,’ preaching ‘God’s gospel to you free of charge’ (2Cor.11:7). This is not just a ministry tactic. This is Paul walking in the gospel, living out the gospel. His person, his method, his every decision was being shaped by the cross of Christ. The truth of Christ, quite literally, is in him.

Paul’s Love

Paul addresses their other accusation, that he refuses their money because he doesn’t love them. Financially investing in an individual creates a close bond, and they feel that Paul is holding them at arms length, not allowing them to get that close. From Paul’s perspective, receiving wages would oblige him to them and he would be relinquishing his freedom to offer the gospel free of charge to all.

2 Corinthians 11:11 And why? Because I do not love you? God knows I do!

He doesn’t even answer this charge, but appeals to God. God knows! He has already answered it. He humbled himself to lift them up. He labored with his own hands to relieve them of the burden of providing for his needs. He plundered other churches to show them that the costly gift of grace truly comes without charge. All this was evidence of his love for them.

Paul is being offensive here, insistent on refusing their payment and plundering poor churches in order to serve them, humiliating them by making them the recipients of charity from poorer saints. But his goal is not to tear them down but to build them up. He humbles them in order to show them what grace really is, to teach them that they must be humble enough to receive something they can’t pay for and don’t deserve. Even in this offense toward them, he is preaching the gospel to them. He is showing them that he loves them enough to tear down their ‘lofty opinions of themselves that are raised up against the knowledge of God’ (2Cor.10:5,8). Paul offends them, but it is a loving offense.

Cutting the Ground from the False Apostles

Paul again affirms that he will not adjust his course of action with them. It seems that they were applying pressure to get him to cave and accept their payments. But he is resolute. Here in verse 12 he gives his reason.

2 Corinthians 11:12 And what I am doing I will continue to do, in order to undermine the claim of those who would like to claim that in their boasted mission they work on the same terms as we do.

The pressure is coming ultimately from the false apostles. They want Paul to receive payment from the Corinthians so that they can claim to be no different than him. He refuses to take the bait. He is accusing them of peddling the word of God for money (2Cor.2:17). Paul here pulls the veil back from the false apostles. They are pressuring Paul to accept payment to justify their own money-grubbing. If Paul persists in refusing compensation, the false teachers will be unable to say that they operate on the same basis as he does, unless they are willing also to refuse payment, which is the whole reason they are there. His refusal is effectively cutting the ground out from under them.

Cultural Sensitivity

Paul is a culturally sensitive missionary. He is keenly aware of the cultural norms and nuances in the different places where he ministers. And he is aware of how the gospel will be perceived through these cultural lenses, so he is wisely strategic in the way he engages with the culture. But Paul will not adapt his message to suit the culture; in fact Paul is willing to offend the cultural sensibilities of the Corinthians for the sake of the gospel. When the truth of the gospel is at stake, he ‘would rather die than have anyone deprive me of my ground for boasting’ (1Cor.9:15).

He is willing to make a public scene and ‘oppose Peter to his face,’ because his ‘conduct was not in step with the truth of the gospel’ (Gal.2:11,14).

Paul is culturally sensitive, not so that he can slip in unnoticed and make no waves, but so that he can make the right waves, gospel waves that crash in the face of cultures of merit that say ‘you get what you pay for’ and ‘there is no such thing as a free lunch’. He plants his feet firmly and demonstrates that the gospel cannot be bought. The gospel is a treasure that is infinitely costly, but God gives it freely to those who don’t deserve it, to those who will humble themselves to receive.

In a culture that treasures popularity and prosperity and pleasure, who says it is a sin to surrender your rights or lay down your life for others, Paul shows us what it means to follow Jesus, who bids us take up our cross, lose our life for his sake and the gospel’s, so we can truly find it (Mt.16:24-25).

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Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 1, 2020 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2 Corinthians 11:5-6; Style vs. Simplicity

10/25_2 Corinthians 11:5-6; Style vs. Simplicity; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20201025_2cor11_5-6.mp3

2 Corinthians 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me! 2 For I feel a divine jealousy for you, since I betrothed you to one husband, to present you as a pure virgin to Christ. 3 But I am afraid that as the serpent deceived Eve by his cunning, your thoughts will be led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ. 4 For if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough. 5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. 6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

A Different Jesus, Spirit, Gospel

Paul rebuked the Corinthians for bearing with another Jesus being proclaimed, a different spirit being received, a different gospel being accepted. They ought not put up with the foolishness the false teachers are foisting on them. As Carson puts it,

“Of course in one sense they preached the same Jesus: they too doubtless believed he was the promised Messiah, that he performed miracles and preached the kingdom of God, that he died, rose from the grave, and ascended to the Father’s right hand. Yet as soon as Jesus Christ is not the sole basis for our salvation, as soon as our acceptability before God depends on something more than his sacrifice on the cross, we have denied the sufficiency of his person and work. At that point the Jesus being preached is no longer the biblical Jesus, but an unreal product of human imagination, a relatively powerless figure who cannot effectively save his people from their sins unless they supplement his work with something of their own merit.” [D.A.Carson, Triumphalism to Maturity, p.88]

The Corinthians were in danger of embracing another Jesus and a different gospel that cannot save. The Corinthians were being lured away from the historic biblical Jesus. The Jesus the of the false apostles was triumphant wonder working Jesus, not the Jesus who suffered and died for our sins and rose again. The spirit they promoted was a spirit who gives supernatural experiences, not the Spirit who produces love and holiness and humility; the gospel they preached was a gospel that promised power, prosperity, and present blessings, not the gospel that secures forgiveness of sins and reconciliation with the all-holy God through the once for all sacrifice of Christ on the cross.

Personality Attack

The false apostles were undermining Paul’s message by attacking him personally. From their perspective, he lacked the proper credentials. He was not a strong leader. He failed to follow through with his plans. He didn’t come with letters of commendation. He didn’t measure up to their standards of public speaking. He quotes their criticism in chapter 10;

2 Corinthians 10:10 For they say, “His letters are weighty and strong, but his bodily presence is weak, and his speech of no account.”

He seems formidable when he writes from a safe distance, but in person he’s really just pathetic. He doesn’t have a commanding presence, and his speech is contemptible. These are masters of spin, twisting everything they can to make Paul look bad and fall out of favor with the church he planted. They have denigrated church leadership into a popularity contest, personality preference, and beauty pageant.

Last and Least of the Apostles

So Paul responds with biting irony

2 Corinthians 11:5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. 6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

Today I want to pull on some threads of words and phrases to see where they appear and how they are woven throughout the tapestry of this letter, to see how Paul develops these themes and points us to Christ.

The word ‘apostle’ means one who is sent out, one commissioned with delegated authority. An apostle in the official sense was one of the twelve, one who was an eyewitness of Jesus’ ministry and resurrection. Paul said back in 1 Corinthians 9

1 Corinthians 9:1 Am I not free? Am I not an apostle? Have I not seen Jesus our Lord? Are not you my workmanship in the Lord? 2 If to others I am not an apostle, at least I am to you, for you are the seal of my apostleship in the Lord.

And in 1 Corinthians 15, he reminds them of the gospel, that Christ died for our sins and was raised, and that he appeared,

1 Corinthians 15:7 …then to all the apostles. 8 Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. 9 For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. 10 But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. …

Paul considers himself last and least of all the apostles.

Super-Apostles

Here he labels those who come proclaiming a different Jesus as ‘super-apostles’. This is the super-favorite intensifying prefix of the apostle Paul. In chapter 1 he says we were super-beyond our strength burdened. In chapter 3 he talks about the super-surpassing glory of the new covenant. In chapter 4 he says the super-surpassing power belongs to God, not to us. He says our affliction is preparing an eternal weight of glory that is super-beyond what is super-beyond. In chapter 7 he says his is super-overflowing with joy. In chapter 9 he points them to the super-surpassing grace of God. In chapter 10 he says he isn’t hyper-extending himself as if he didn’t reach all the way to them, but he does hope to hyper-extend himself into lands beyond them. In chapter 11 he boasts of his super-beyond beatings, and in chapter 12 because of his super-beyond revelations, he was given a thorn in his flesh to keep him from becoming super-conceited.

Here and in 12:11 Paul caricatures those who proclaim another Jesus as ‘super-apostles.’ In verse 13 he calls them ‘false apostles, deceitful workmen, disguising themselves as apostles of Christ.’ and in verse 14 he calls them servants of Satan. He calls the super-apostles because they paint themselves as better than Paul. They are super-apostles, in an ironic sense, because they have gone far beyond what an apostle of Christ is commissioned to do, preaching another Jesus, a different spirit, a different gospel. They have gone beyond the bounds of legitimate apostles, who are slaves of Christ, expected to be faithful to Christ. As Paul said in 1 Corinthians 4

1 Corinthians 4:9 For I think that God has exhibited us apostles as last of all, like men sentenced to death, because we have become a spectacle to the world, to angels, and to men.

The apostles testified to Christ not only by word, but also by their sufferings. The super-apostles have moved far beyond the bounds of what a faithful apostle was sent to do.

How To Count Like the Apostle

2 Corinthians 11:5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles.

Paul says that he is not lacking when counts himself against the super-apostles. This word ‘consider’ is one that Paul has used frequently in this letter. It means to count, consider, conclude, to take inventory and reckon; use logic to think about something from a particular perspective. He said in chapter 10 that he counts on showing boldness to those who count him as walking according to his own fleshly desires. He says that they are looking at appearances. Consider that we belong to Christ as much as anyone. Consider or count on it that what we say by letter, we will put into action when we are present. In chapter 12 he does not want anyone to count or consider him as more than what they have seen evidence of in him. All the way back in chapter 3, he shares the way he counts.

2 Corinthians 3:5 Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim [or count, consider] anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God, 6 who has made us sufficient to be ministers of a new covenant…

He doesn’t count or consider anything as having its source in him. Here he shares with them how he counts. He counts himself as not lacking anything in comparison with the super-apostles.

Incompetent Speaking

2 Corinthians 11:6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

He is accused that his speech is contemptible, of being unskilled in speaking. The Greek word here is ἰδιώτης. It refers to someone who does not have specialized training in a particular field. This is ironic, because Paul was educated, in contrast to the rest of the genuine apostles, who according to Acts 4:13 were ‘uneducated, common men.’ According to Peter, Paul writes some things that are hard to understand which ignorant people twist. Have you read Paul? In this letter, he is employing his rhetorical skill to cut the feet out from under the false apostles.

Making It Plain

2 Corinthians 11:5 Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. 6 Even if I am unskilled in speaking, I am not so in knowledge; indeed, in every way we have made this plain to you in all things.

Paul says even if, as his enemies argue, he is an incompetent speaker, he is not unskilled in knowledge. He has made this apparent in all things and in every way. This word making apparent, making plain, revealing or manifesting is a word we have seen several times in this letter. In chapter 7 he wrote as he did to reveal to them their own earnestness for him. In chapter 5, we must all be revealed before the judgment seat of Christ, and what we are is revealed to God and he hopes it is revealed to them as well. In chapter 4 the life of Jesus is revealed in his body. In chapter 3, it is revealed that they are Paul’s recommendation letter from Christ. In chapter 2 the fragrance of the knowledge of Christ is revealed through the genuine apostles.

It should be revealed and apparent to them in all things and in every way that Paul is not incompetent in knowledge.

The Knowledge of Christ

It is through Paul that the fragrance of the knowledge of Christ is revealed, made plain, made apparent always and everywhere. Paul has this ministry by the mercy of God.

2 Corinthians 4:2 But we have renounced disgraceful, underhanded ways. We refuse to practice cunning or to tamper with God’s word, but by the open statement of the truth we would commend ourselves to everyone’s conscience in the sight of God.

Paul openly and plainly proclaims the truth.

2 Corinthians 4:5 For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake. 6 For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. 7 But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us.

Paul is not into self-promotion; he lifts up Jesus Christ as Lord. He is a slave; a cracked clay pot, and the treasure of the knowledge of God in the face of Jesus Christ the Lord shines out through every fracture.

Skilled Speech and the Foolishness of the Cross

Paul’s ‘unskilled speaking,’ they ought to remember from 1 Corinthians, is not a lack of ability, but a conscious choice. Paul chose to communicate the gospel simply, plainly, without pandering to their taste for eloquent oratory.

1 Corinthians 1:17 For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with words of eloquent wisdom, lest the cross of Christ be emptied of its power. 18 For the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

His apostolic calling, his commission from Christ demanded that he preach the gospel in the power of the Spirit of God. They may have considered his preaching style foolish, but

1 Corinthians 1:21 For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, it pleased God through the folly of what we preach to save those who believe.

If you consider my style unskilled, Paul says, it reveals more about you than it does about me.

1 Corinthians 1:23 but we preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles, 24 but to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

Paul said:

1 Corinthians 2:1 And I, when I came to you, brothers, did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. 2 For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. 3 And I was with you in weakness and in fear and much trembling, 4 and my speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 5 so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God.

Paul refused manipulative preaching tactics. He renounced disgraceful underhanded ways of working an audience. He willingly chose the path of unskilled speaking so that God would get all the glory. But he is not unskilled in knowledge. He says:

1 Corinthians 2:12 Now we have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, that we might understand the things freely given us by God. 13 And we impart this in words not taught by human wisdom but taught by the Spirit, interpreting spiritual truths to those who are spiritual.

God hid his spiritual wisdom in plain sight and in plain language, so that those who are humbled by God’s Spirit can see it, but those who think much of themselves toss it aside as beneath them.

The gospel is not hard, but it is hard to swallow. You are a sinner. You deserve death. But Jesus took your place and died the death you deserve. Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures. He died to bring us near to God, to reconcile us so that we can now enjoy a relationship with our risen Lord.

Application / Use

What do we do with this? First, humble yourself to receive it. Don’t make it complex when it is simple. Don’t add anything to it. The gospel is a gift to be received freely, and many are too proud to receive it.

The gospel is a gift, but there’s enough to go around. We can’t keep it to ourselves. Know Christ and make him known. We need to spread the word. When we do, keep it simple. Simply and plainly proclaim the truth about Jesus and the cross, and pray that God’s Spirit would open blind eyes to humbly and freely receive.

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Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

November 1, 2020 Posted by | 2 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment