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Preaching from the Pulpit of Ephraim Church of the Bible

Romans 1:11-15; 15:14-15; One Another Ministry

07/26 One Another Ministry; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150726_one-another-ministry.mp3

Romans 1 [ESV2011]

Romans 1:7 To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

Romans 1:11 For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you— 12 that is, that we may be mutually encouraged by each other’s faith, both yours and mine. 13 I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, that I have often intended to come to you (but thus far have been prevented), in order that I may reap some harvest among you as well as among the rest of the Gentiles.

15 So I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome.

Romans 15:5 May the God of endurance and encouragement grant you to live in such harmony with one another, in accord with Christ Jesus, 6 that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. 7 Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.

Romans 15:14 I myself am satisfied about you, my brothers, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge and able to instruct one another. 15 But on some points I have written to you very boldly by way of reminder, because of the grace given me by God

One Another in Romans

As our Bible text for today, I want to look at the beginning and ending of the book of Romans. Romans is Paul’s magnum opus on the gospel, probably his most thorough and systematic teaching on our desperate and hopeless sinful condition, and on sinners being declared righteous not by our works but by grace alone through faith alone in the finished work of Christ alone to the glory of God alone. But listen to what he writes as a preface to this great proclamation of the gospel.

Romans 1:11 For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you— 12 that is, that we may be mutually encouraged by each other’s faith, both yours and mine. 13 I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, that I have often intended to come to you (but thus far have been prevented), in order that I may reap some harvest among you as well as among the rest of the Gentiles.

…15 So I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome.

Paul is eager to visit Rome to strengthen the believers there, but he is aware that this would not be a one-way ministry. Instead it would be a one-another ministry. To visit would mean that he would be able to strengthen and encourage them in their faith, but also that the apostle would be strengthened and encouraged in his own faith by the Roman believers. Imagine, if the Apostle Paul were planning to visit our church! Imagine the questions we would have for him, imagine the expectation of how we would benefit from his ministry. Imagine the eagerness to just sit and soak in the teaching of the great apostle to the Gentiles! And imagine him saying that he is longing to be strengthened in his faith by us! That seems absurd, but that is what he says. He is expecting to be mutually encouraged by one another’s faith.

Keep in mind who he is writing to.

Romans 1:7 To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints:

He is not addressing only the mature believers. He is not addressing only the elite, only the spiritual. He was addressing every believer. Every saint. Old or young, male or female, mature or immature, he was eager to have a mutual ministry, a one-another ministry; to strengthen and to be strengthened, to build up and to be built up, to preach the gospel and to be encouraged in the gospel. Paul did not approach a church with the idea that he had everything to give that they needed and nothing to learn from them. He was acutely aware that he was the chief of sinners, and he needed to be encouraged in the gospel by them as much as they needed to benefit from his gifts. Paul recognized that, although he had been called to an unique, foundational, unrepeatable ministry in the church, that he was was always only a stray sheep that had been brought home by the Good Shepherd. He was one member of the body, desperately in need of and dependent on the other members of the body to be able to function in the way God meant for him to function.

Paul’s Need For One Another Ministry

Paul needed the help of other believers. In Romans 15 Paul expects to be helped on his missionary travels by the believers. And he asks for prayer for protection and to be useful to the saints. In Ephesians 6, Paul asks the church to pray for him for boldness in proclaiming the gospel. In Colossians 4, he asks for prayer for an open door for the word. In 2 Thessalonians 3 he asks for prayer that the word of God would advance and be honored. In 1 Thessalonians 5 he simply asks “brothers, pray for us”. Paul recognized his need for the other gifts of the body to minister to him. He was not ashamed to ask for their help.

The Philippian church sent Epaphroditus to minister to Paul’s need. The church at Corinth sent Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus to make up for their lack and to refresh his spirit. While Paul was in Corinth, brothers from Macedonia came and supplied his need. Paul would have been glad for Onesimus to serve him in his need on behalf of Philemon. Paul asks Titus to come spend the winter with him in Nicopolis. At the end of his life, Paul asks Timothy to come to him before winter. He asks him to bring Mark, who is useful to him, and to bring his cloak, and the books, especially the parchments.

Over and over again in his letters Paul mentions his co-workers in the ministry. Paul was not a one man show. He was acutely aware that he was a part of something much bigger than himself. He was a part of the body of Christ, and he needed the one another ministry of the church.

One Another Ministry

As we look at what the New Testament letters tell us about one another ministry, we see a lot of teaching on how to relate to one another in the body of Christ.

Do not:

There is some clear teaching on the things we are not to do or be toward one another.

Romans 1:27 do not be consumed with lust for one another,

Romans 14:13 Do not pass judgment on one another; do not stumble one another.

1 Corinthians 6:7 do not wrong or defraud one another

1 Corinthians 7:5 Do not deprive one another

1 Corinthians 11:33 do not be rude to one another—

2 Corinthians 10:12 do not compare yourselves with one another

Galatians 5:15 do not bite and devour one another, …26 do not provoke one another, do not envy one another.

Colossians 3:9 Do not lie to one another,

Titus 3:3 do not hate one another.

Hebrews 10:25 do not neglect to meet together with one another, as is the habit of some,

James 4:11 Do not speak evil against one another,

James 5:9 Do not grumble against one another,

These are some clear things to avoid in our interaction with one another

Greet One Another

But the teaching is not only negative. The New Testament has much to say on how we are to interact with one another.

Romans 16:16 Greet one another

1 Corinthians 16:20 Greet one another

2 Corinthians 13:12 Greet one another

1 Peter 5:.14 Greet one another

Romans 15:7 welcome one another

We are to be a warm welcoming community that cares for one another. We are to extend a heartfelt affectionate greeting to our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Love one another

Romans 12:10 Love one another with brotherly affection.

Romans 13:8 love each other, for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.

1 Thessalonians 3:12 abound in love for one another

1 Thessalonians 4:9 love one another,

2 Thessalonians 1:3 increase in love of every one of you for one another

1 Peter 1:22 love one another earnestly from a pure heart,

1 Peter 4:8 Above all, keep loving one another earnestly,

1 John 3:11 love one another. …23 believe in Jesus and love one another, just as he has commanded us.

1 John 4:7 love one another, . …11 love one another. 12 love one another

2 John 1:5 love one another.

Galatians 5:13 through love serve one another.

Clearly we are to be characterized by love in our interaction with one another. To love is to actively pursue the highest good of the other person. We are to be seeking the good of one another in all things. But what does this look like? How do we pursue the good of the other?

Build Up One Another

Romans 1:12 mutually encourage one another’s faith

Romans 12:5 we are one body in Christ, …members one of another.

Romans 12:10 Outdo one another in showing honor. …16 Live in harmony with one another.

Romans 14:19 build up one another

Romans 15:5 live in harmony with one another, in accord with Christ Jesus, 6 glorify God with one another 7 welcome one another …14 instruct one another.

1 Corinthians 12:25 have the same care for one another.

2 Corinthians 13:11 comfort one another, agree with one another, live in peace

Galatians 6:2 Bear one another’s burdens,

Ephesians 4:2 bearing with one another in love, …25 speak the truth with your neighbor, for we are members one of another. …32 Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.

Ephesians 5:19 address one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, sing and make melody to the Lord with your heart, …21 submit to one another out of reverence for Christ.

Philippians 2:3 count one another as more significant than yourself

Colossians 3:13 bear with one another; forgive one another; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. …16 teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God.

1 Thessalonians 4:18 encourage one another with these words.

1 Thessalonians 5:11 Therefore encourage one another and build one another up, . …15 do good to one another.

Hebrews 3:13 But exhort one another every day,

Hebrews 10:24 And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, 25 encourage one another,

James 5:16 Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another,

1 Peter 4: 9 Show hospitality to one another without grumbling. 10 Each use gifts to serve one another,

1 Peter 5:5 be humble toward one another

1 John 1:7 walk in the light, and have fellowship with one another

In humility we are to love one another by caring, comforting, encouraging, exhorting, admonishing, forgiving, building up, coming along side, submitting to, teaching, and stirring up one another toward good works. We are to live in harmony with one another. Romans 15 recognizes that this one another ministry is a gift of God, and paints a picture of what this looks like in the life of the church.

Romans 15:5 May the God of endurance and encouragement grant you to live in such harmony with one another, in accord with Christ Jesus, 6 that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. 7 Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.

Our harmony, our unity, our care for one another, will sing God’s praises and bring much glory to the Father

Able to Instruct One Another

Listen to what Paul says toward the close of his letter to the Romans. After laying out rich and solid theological truth, he says:

Romans 15:14 I myself am satisfied about you, my brothers, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge and able to instruct one another. 15 But on some points I have written to you very boldly by way of reminder, because of the grace given me by God

He is preaching the gospel to those in Rome, he is teaching them truth, but all this is to remind them, and he is confident that they are able to instruct one another. That is amazing confidence and trust. Do you think the apostle would say that about you? I am satisfied that you are able to instruct one another? Paul is feeding the fire of their faith with the fuel of his teaching, but he is confident in the one another ministry of the church. And he is eager to benefit from that one another ministry. He says in verse 32

Romans 15:32 so that by God’s will I may come to you with joy and be refreshed in your company.

The Apostle Paul, eager to be refreshed by their company! Listen brother, listen sister, you have something to offer. You can instruct others. You can refresh others by your company. You are useful in ministry!

We often misunderstand what ministry should look like. It is not the job of a paid professional to evangelize every person. It is not the job of pastors to care for the needs of every person. It is the job of pastors to equip the saints for the work of the ministry. Ministry is not something done by a few people who are in the ministry. Ministry is done by the body of Christ. One way we do this is to provide opportunities for ordinary people to be involved in ministry, in serving others, and train them up and come along side them in the process and encourage and support them.

Broken Vessels

We are all broken, hurting, messed up people. We all come with baggage. For some of us, our baggage looks like sinful habits and damaged relationships from sinful choices. For others, our baggage looks like a pious sense of superiority that thinks we can earn God’s favor by our impressive resume and conscientious avoidance of those behaviors we deem most sinful. We are all sinners saved by the riches of God’s marvelous grace.

In our camp ministry over the past month, we as broken hurting messed up pastors, took broken hurting messed up teens who have been transformed by God’s grace, and gave them an opportunity to love and serve and invest in broken hurting messed up kids with the life transforming good news of Jesus Christ and him crucified for broken hurting messed up sinners.

We have experienced three weeks of God doing extraordinary things through ordinary people. We have seen God transform lives, and we have seen him do it through some of our own teens.

…testimonies from leadership campers…

briefly share how God used you and what you learned through the experience

If this is what God can do through through a few ordinary people who say ‘we are not perfect, but we have been transformed by Jesus and we are willing to be used by him in the lives of one another’. If this is what God did, imagine what he wants to do with you! Imagine what we could accomplish if each of us was willing to use our gifts in service to one another. Through love serve one another.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

July 27, 2015 Posted by | occasional, podcast | , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 16:19-24; The Love and Grace of Jesus

07/19 1 Corinthians 16:19-24 The Love and Grace of Jesus; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150719_1cor16_19-24.mp3

1 Corinthians 16 [SBLGNT]

19 Ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς αἱ ἐκκλησίαι τῆς Ἀσίας. ἀσπάζεται ὑμᾶς ἐν κυρίῳ πολλὰ Ἀκύλας καὶ Πρίσκα σὺν τῇ κατ’ οἶκον αὐτῶν ἐκκλησίᾳ. 20 ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς οἱ ἀδελφοὶ πάντες. ἀσπάσασθε ἀλλήλους ἐν φιλήματι ἁγίῳ. 21 Ὁ ἀσπασμὸς τῇ ἐμῇ χειρὶ Παύλου. 22 εἴ τις οὐ φιλεῖ τὸν κύριον, ἤτω ἀνάθεμα. Μαράνα θά. 23 ἡ χάρις τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ μεθ’ ὑμῶν. 24 ἡ ἀγάπη μου μετὰ πάντων ὑμῶν ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ.

1 Corinthians 16 [ESV2011]

13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love.

15 Now I urge you, brothers—you know that the household of Stephanas were the first converts in Achaia, and that they have devoted themselves to the service of the saints— 16 be subject to such as these, and to every fellow worker and laborer. 17 I rejoice at the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus, because they have made up for your absence, 18 for they refreshed my spirit as well as yours. Give recognition to such people.

19 The churches of Asia send you greetings. Aquila and Prisca, together with the church in their house, send you hearty greetings in the Lord. 20 All the brothers send you greetings. Greet one another with a holy kiss. 21 I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. 22 If anyone has no love for the Lord, let him be accursed. Our Lord, come! 23 The grace of the Lord Jesus be with you. 24 My love be with you all in Christ Jesus. Amen.

Greetings

Paul is giving final greetings to the Corinthian church. He passes along personal greetings from three different groups, he admonishes them to greet one another, and he gives them his own greeting. This word ‘greeting’ means to embrace, to salute, to wish well, to welcome, to receive joyfully. Literally it means to draw to oneself. This is a personal relational concept. If a friend is traveling to a place where you once lived, you might ask them to say hello to your friends there or to give them a hug for you.

The first greeting is from the churches of Asia. This would include the churches in Pergamum, Thyatira; Sardis, Smyrna; Philadelphia, Laodicea; Colossae; and the church in Ephesus, where he is writing from. With the exception of Ephesus, the majority of the believers in these other churches had likely never been to or met anyone in the church in Corinth. But their faith in Jesus had made them brothers and sisters. There is a fellowship, a camaraderie even among Jesus followers who have never met one another. United by a common love for the Lord, they find themselves in a close knit family, many of whom they will never meet this side of eternity. Paul began this letter by addressing ‘the church of God in Corinth, …those called to be saints together with all those who in every place call upon the name of our Lord Jesus Christ (1:2). Here he is sending a brotherly greeting from many of these fellow saints in Asia.

He also sends greetings from Aquila and Prisca and the church in their house. Unlike many in Asia, Aquila and Prisca knew personally those in the church in Corinth. In Acts 18, when Paul first came to Corinth, he met this couple, who had recently relocated to Corinth because they had been evicted from Rome. They shared the same tent making trade with Paul. After 18 months, they left with Paul and traveled to Ephesus. It was in Ephesus that they met Apollos, and it was Priscilla and Aquila who took Apollos aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately. Apollos was then sent off to Achaia and taught the believers in Corinth. So there was a close connection and relationship between the Corinthians believers and Priscilla and Aquila. Paul says in his greeting in Romans 16:3-4 that Prisca and Aquila are fellow-workers who risked their necks for his life. Aquila and Prisca, now living in Ephesus, used their home to host the believers. They must have had some wealth, to be able to have a home suitable for hosting the gatherings of the church. The church that met in their home also sent sent much greetings in the Lord. It is the Lord Jesus who unites believers and brings them into relationship with himself and with one another.

The third greeting comes from ‘all the brothers’. This is a greeting from Paul’s co-workers, which would include Apollos and Timothy, among others.

Christian Unity

Then Paul exhorts them to greet one another with a holy kiss. A holy kiss was an appropriate greeting for holy people, or saints. Culturally the kiss was a way to show honor and respect, a way to demonstrate friendship and reconciliation. In that culture it was a kiss on the cheek, a way of greeting that is still practiced in middle eastern countries today. We might bring this into our culture as a holy handshake or a brotherly embrace.

This would have been a difficult command for the Corinthians to obey. Most of this letter is addressing divisions in the church, divisions of a party spirit over this or that teacher, divisions on issues of morality, divisions over issues of conscience, division between those of different social status and wealth, divisions over what was culturally appropriate behavior, divisions over what gifts marked them out as more spiritual, even doctrinal divisions over such a central issue as the resurrection. Paul says, regardless of race, regardless of ethnic background, regardless of social status or class boundaries, regardless of what party you belonged to, regardless of gifting, you are to warmly and affectionately greet one another.

This is a practical expression of good theology. Paul preached Christ crucified for sinners. So whether wise or foolish, whether powerful or weak, whether of noble birth or of lower class, despised, or nothing, all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. All together deserve death, and all alike need a rescuer who will pay the price for sin and bring them into a right relationship with God. At the cross, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Gal.3:28); “Here there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all” (Col.3:11). As Paul said in chapter 12

1 Corinthians 12:13 For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body— Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

There is one body, and it has many members. Whatever lines we may have divided along before, we are now one in Christ. We have received the same Spirit and we have been made one in Christ.

Colossians 1:20 and through [the Son] to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

Paul’s Signature and the Pseudapigrapha

Paul then gives them his own greeting.

1 Corinthians 16:21 I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand.

If we had the original letter to look at, we would notice a change in the handwriting in these last lines. Most letter writing was done as dictation to a trained writer or amanuensis. We find this at the end of Paul’s letter to the Romans:

Romans 16:22 I Tertius, who wrote this letter, greet you in the Lord.

Tertius served as Paul’s writer for his letter to the Romans. But the final greetings were in the distinctive personal handwriting of the apostle, and by this he gave his approval to the final draft of the letter. Paul said to the Galatian churches:

Galatians 6:11 See with what large letters I am writing to you with my own hand.

Already, deceivers had attempted to lead the believers astray, even writing letters in the name of Paul. Paul writes to the Thessalonians:

2 Thessalonians 2:1 Now concerning the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered together to him, we ask you, brothers, 2 not to be quickly shaken in mind or alarmed, either by a spirit or a spoken word, or a letter seeming to be from us, to the effect that the day of the Lord has come.

He closes that letter with

2 Thessalonians 3:17 I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. This is the sign of genuineness in every letter of mine; it is the way I write.

You have probably heard some of the nonsense about writings being removed from our New Testament at a council by a Roman emperor. There are other writings in existence from the early centuries, claiming to be Scripture. They are known as pseudapigrapha, a term that means false writing, because they were heretical writings that falsely claimed to be written by an apostle or an important person in order to gain a wide acceptance. The church recognized these as forgeries attempting to lead astray, and the church never accepted these. The church didn’t need the help of an emperor to discern the genuine from the false. Paul warns the church to be on guard against these forgeries, and he takes the practical measure of giving them a sign of genuineness in his own hand.

Love Jesus or Go To Hell

Paul’s personal greeting at first seems a bit shocking.

1 Corinthians 16:22 If anyone has no love for the Lord, let him be accursed. Our Lord, come!

He uses the word ‘anathema’. In Romans 9:3 he says that if possible, he would wish himself to be accursed if that could bring about the salvation of his fellow Jews. In 1 Corinthians 12:3 he says that no one who has God’s Spirit can call Jesus accursed. To the Galatians he says:

Galatians 1:7 …there are some who trouble you and want to distort the gospel of Christ. 8 But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. 9 As we have said before, so now I say again: If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed.

Here he says ‘if anyone has no love for the Lord, let him be accursed.’ Love is the greatest command.

Mark 12:29 Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ 31 The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Love for God is the greatest command. Love is the more excellent way.

1 Corinthians 13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing.

Love is the more excellent way, and love is what the Corinthian church lacked. They were divisive. They were proud. They thought themselves better than others. They did not love enough to discipline a wayward brother. They loved gain and pleasure more than they loved other people. They cherished their own rights over the eternal well-being of other believers. Paul warns them to flee from sexual immorality (6:18). He reminds them

1 Corinthians 6:19 …You are not your own, 20 for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.

He says that although I have rights, and

1 Corinthians 9:19 For though I am free from all, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them. …22 To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some. 23 I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings.

Paul warns ‘flee from idolatry’ (10:14). He warns that we cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons and that we dare not provoke the Lord to jealousy (10:21-22). He says:

1 Corinthians 10:31 So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 32 Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, 33 just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved.

Love for God seeks to bring glory to God and to seek the good of others as higher than ones own good.

Here he does not use the great word ‘agape’. Here he uses what is in some contexts synonymous, what is in other contexts a lesser word ‘phileo’, the word for friendship love, for warm affection. At the end of the gospel of John, after Peter said that he was willing to die with Jesus and then after he denied even knowing Jesus three times, the risen Lord came to Peter and asked ‘Simon do you love me sacrificially more than these?’ Peter said ‘yes Lord, you know that I love you affectionately. Jesus said to him a second time ‘Simon, do you love me sacrificially?’ Peter replied ‘yes, Lord, you know that I love you affectionately’. Jesus said to him a third time ‘Simon, do you love me affectionately? Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time ‘do you love me affectionately?’. Peter responded ‘Lord you know everything. You know that I love you affectionately’.

We aspire to love the Lord our God selflessly, sacrificially, with all our heart and soul and mind and strength. But we so often fall short. Peter was made excruciatingly aware of his own shortcomings. But he had a strong affection for Jesus. Paul says here, ‘If you don’t have a strong affection for Jesus, you will go to hell’. In chapter 15 he warned them of the danger of not standing firm in the gospel, of not holding fast to it, of believing in vain. This is a strong wake up call. If we do not have a love and affection for Christ that begins to overrule our other desires, then we may be accursed.

Maranatha!

1 Corinthians 16:22 If anyone has no love for the Lord, let him be accursed. Our Lord, come!

Paul pronounces an anathema, then Paul says ‘Maranatha!’. Maranatha is an Aramaic word that means ‘come Lord!’ Throughout this letter Paul has reminded the Corinthians that God is the ultimate judge, and we will all stand before him on that day. This is an exclamation, a prayer full of hope. Maranatha! The Lord is coming and he is the great judge, he will bring justice, but his coming is salvation to all who are trusting in him.

John 3:17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

The Psalmist warns:

Psalm 2:12 Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and you perish in the way, for his wrath is quickly kindled. Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

The coming of Jesus is both a curse and a blessing. It is a curse to those who have rejected him, to those who are perishing, but it brings abundant blessing to those who are trusting in him, to those who are being saved by him.

Grace of the Lord Jesus

1 Corinthians 16:23 The grace of the Lord Jesus be with you.

Paul reminds them of grace. His prayer is that the grace of the Lord Jesus would be with them. Grace is God’s undeserved favor and kindness. Grace by definition is unearned and freely given. The fact that we are not accursed, the fact that the coming of the Lord is something we long for, the fact that we have a strong affection for Jesus, all this is evidence of God’s rich and powerful grace. God gives us what we don’t deserve. God extends his transforming grace to his enemies, and it changes us. The gospel is a message of grace. It has nothing to do with earning or deserving. It is simply and totally God’s freedom to give good gifts to those who could never earn it.

Usually, we think of grace as coming from God the Father. But here Paul specifically says that this is the grace that comes from the Lord Jesus. Jesus is continually giving us his grace.

Paul prays for the believers in Corinth that the grace of Jesus would be with them. As a believer we need his grace with us every moment. We are never done with grace. We never outgrow his grace. We never come to a point when we begin to deserve. We never earn. We are eternally dependent on his grace. We are forever those who receive. Salvation and the Christian life are all of grace.

Love

1 Corinthians 16:24 My love be with you all in Christ Jesus. Amen.

Paul’s closing word to them is a reminder of his love for them. This is a church that he loves. These are people he cares deeply for. He has confronted sin, he has corrected error, he has challenged their thinking, he has commanded them to run from sin and pursue holiness. He has rebuked and even insulted and shamed the Corinthians. But throughout he has affirmed his love for them. All this is seeking their good. He is laboring for their eternal joy. He loves them. His love is with them in Christ Jesus. It is all because of Jesus. His love for them is an expression of the grace of Jesus. We love because he first loved us. The final word is Jesus.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

July 19, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 16:15-18; Refreshing Saints and Apostles

07/12 1 Corinthians 16:15-18 Refreshing Saints and Apostles ; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150712_1cor16_15-18.mp3

1 Corinthians 16 [SBLGNT]

15 Παρακαλῶ δὲ ὑμᾶς, ἀδελφοί· οἴδατε τὴν οἰκίαν Στεφανᾶ, ὅτι ἐστὶν ἀπαρχὴ τῆς Ἀχαΐας καὶ εἰς διακονίαν τοῖς ἁγίοις ἔταξαν ἑαυτούς· 16 ἵνα καὶ ὑμεῖς ὑποτάσσησθε τοῖς τοιούτοις καὶ παντὶ τῷ συνεργοῦντι καὶ κοπιῶντι. 17 χαίρω δὲ ἐπὶ τῇ παρουσίᾳ Στεφανᾶ καὶ Φορτουνάτου καὶ Ἀχαϊκοῦ, ὅτι τὸ ὑμέτερον ὑστέρημα οὗτοι ἀνεπλήρωσαν, 18 ἀνέπαυσαν γὰρ τὸ ἐμὸν πνεῦμα καὶ τὸ ὑμῶν. ἐπιγινώσκετε οὖν τοὺς τοιούτους.

1 Corinthians 16 [ESV2011]

13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love.

15 Now I urge you, brothers—you know that the household of Stephanas were the first converts in Achaia, and that they have devoted themselves to the service of the saints— 16 be subject to such as these, and to every fellow worker and laborer. 17 I rejoice at the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus, because they have made up for your absence, 18 for they refreshed my spirit as well as yours. Give recognition to such people.

Paul is giving his closing exhortations to the Corinthians church. Back in chapters 9 and 10, Paul held himself up as an example to the believers in surrendering rights and seeking the good of others above one’s own good, and in 11:1 Paul says ‘be imitators of me, as I am of Christ. Here at the close of this letter, he holds a member of their own congregation up as worthy of honor and imitation. He points to the household of Stephanas.

Firstfruits

Here he says that the household of Stephanas was the firstfruits of the region of Achaia. This is the same word ‘firstfruits’ that he used in 15:20 of Christ as the firstfruits of the resurrection of believers who have fallen asleep. The firstfruits was an Old Testament offering, a sample from the harvest, it shares continuity with the rest of the harvest, it was a part of the harvest, and it was a promise of more good things to come. In 1:16, he said that he had baptized the household of Stephanas. The household of Stephanas were some of the first to believe the gospel in that region, and Paul looked at them as a promise of more to come. The good news of Jesus Christ crucified for sinners and risen from the dead had penetrated into a dark place, had created new life, and had begun to transform sinners, and he expected that to spread.

Devoted Themselves

Listen to how Paul describes these believers. He says that they have devoted themselves to the service of the saints. This is not something that was pushed on them. This is not something they did unwillingly or half-heartedly. They devoted themselves. This word can be translated ‘to addict, to appoint, to determine, to ordain, to set.’ They addicted themselves to the service of the saints. They set themselves apart to this purpose. They were determined to serve. This was voluntary, eager service. This was not under compulsion, these were cheerful givers. They delighted themselves in serving others. They set themselves aside to be useful to the believers. Do you know anyone like this? We need people like this in our churches, people who are not looking for position or recognition, people who simply want to be useful to God by serving his people. This word service is where we get our word ‘deacon’ – it simply means a servant.

These are often behind the scenes people, people who are not interested in the limelight, selfless people who prefer to remain unknown and unrecognized. People who simply see a need and do whatever is within their power to care for that need. These are people who recognize their gifts and without drawing attention to themselves, simply get busy using their gifts to love and serve and build up others. These are truly selfless people, who genuinely care about others more than they care about themselves.

Household

Notice that Paul is not referring to one particular individual. He says ‘you know the household of Stephanas’. This was a family that served together. We aren’t told details, but a household would likely include Stephanas and his wife, his children, and possibly any servants he employed, possibly others who lived with them, who were under his care, who together found joy in serving the saints. This is family ministry. A whole family that was united to serve others. The family unit is a powerful thing.

Sometimes the gospel divides families. When an individual hears the gospel, he may have to choose to follow Jesus, knowing that following Jesus could destroy his relationship with his wife, with his children, with his family. Paul understands the dynamic where a family is divided over the gospel, and he gave practical instructions on how to handle these kinds of situations in chapter 7. But here he is looking at a family that is united by the gospel and transformed by the gospel with a passion to serve the people of God.

Joshua said ‘choose this day whom you will serve… But as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD’. This is a household that has recognized the many different things that families are all about, the many different things families are passionate about and centered around, and they have chosen to center family life around service to the believers. They have prioritized in a radically different way than the culture around them and given themselves over to Christian service. Mother, father, children old and young, all looking away from themselves and their own wants and needs at how to love and serve and care for the body of Christ.

This is a radically different model for life and ministry. This is not the family making sacrifices so dad or mom can go off and serve in this or that ministry. This is the family together as a team loving and serving in ways that can only be done by a household. Certainly this includes hospitality, where the home is an environment defined by loving service to others, where others can be welcomed in and cared for and nurtured. Quite possibly, the church used the home of this family for their meetings, which would mean that the family took on the responsibility of preparing for and cleaning up after the meeting of the church. This doesn’t necessarily mean an immaculate showroom house, but it would include essential things like making sure the bathroom is clean and functioning, providing appropriate space for guests to feel welcomed and cared for, creating an atmosphere of others-focused selfless welcoming love.

What is your household like? Is your home a Christ centered home? Is your primary aim to advance the gospel? Is your home a place where believers can feel safe and loved and cared for and built up?

Servant Leadership

Paul holds up the household of Stephanas as an an example of what devotion to Christ can look like in a household. He encourages the believers to ‘be subject to such as these’. We often want leaders who are in control, who are determined, aggressive, forceful, who speak well and look good out front. But Paul has a different perspective. And this is in line with what Jesus taught. In Luke 22 we see:

Luke 22:24 A dispute also arose among them, as to which of them was to be regarded as the greatest.

It is startling to remember the context of this conversation. Jesus had just taken bread and said ‘this is my body broken for you’ and ‘this cup is my blood which is poured out for the forgiveness of your sins’. He had told them that he was about to be betrayed and crucified. And they around the table are disputing about who is the greatest.

Luke 22:25 And he said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them, and those in authority over them are called benefactors. 26 But not so with you. Rather, let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves. 27 For who is the greater, one who reclines at table or one who serves? Is it not the one who reclines at table? But I am among you as the one who serves.

Jesus initiated a different kind of leadership. His authority is not a top down controlling authoritarian you-serve-me kind of leadership. His leadership is a humble-hearted others-centered loving service. The household of Stephanas was a real life example of what this looks like, and Paul exhorts the Corinthians to voluntarily submit to such as these. These and every fellow worker and laborer.

We see Paul hold up another example of a fellow-worker who gave him joy, ministered to his needs, and is to be honored and imitated. He writes to the church in Philippi:

Philippians 2:25 I have thought it necessary to send to you Epaphroditus my brother and fellow worker and fellow soldier, and your messenger and minister to my need, 26 for he has been longing for you all and has been distressed because you heard that he was ill. 27 Indeed he was ill, near to death. But God had mercy on him, and not only on him but on me also, lest I should have sorrow upon sorrow. 28 I am the more eager to send him, therefore, that you may rejoice at seeing him again, and that I may be less anxious. 29 So receive him in the Lord with all joy, and honor such men, 30 for he nearly died for the work of Christ, risking his life to complete what was lacking in your service to me.

Epaphras, like Stephanas, was a selfless servant who put other before himself, who filled up the lack and brought joy to those he served. He was a brother, a fellow-worker, a fellow soldier.

Some people talk about going into the ministry as if it were a glamorous career choice. Ministry simply means service, and service to people can be painful and messy and just plain hard. Paul says to be subject to every fellow-worker and laborer. This word laborer literally means to be weary or feel fatigue. Serving others, especially serving those who are disgruntled or opinionated or easily offended can be draining and exhausting. Ministry is eternally rewarding, but it can be just plain fatiguing.

Refreshing the Spirit

Listen to what the Apostle Paul says.

1 Corinthians 16:17 I rejoice at the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus, because they have made up for your absence, 18 for they refreshed my spirit as well as yours. Give recognition to such people.

It seems the letter the Corinthian church wrote to Paul was delivered by these men. He says that these three filled up what was lacking on their part. Paul had strong affection for the Corinthians. These were people he led to Christ, people he had invested his life in. He walked life with them. He missed them. He truly enjoyed their company. The visit from these three brought the apostle much joy. They refreshed his spirit. We don’t often think of the great Apostle to the Gentiles as needing to be refreshed, maybe even becoming depressed and discouraged. But he says in 2 Corinthians 1:8 that ‘we were so utterly burdened beyond our strength that we despaired of life itself.’ In two of his letters, Paul describes himself as being ‘poured out as a drink offering’ (Phil.2:17; 2Tim.4:6). Even in the midst of fruitful ministry where many were believing the gospel and being baptized, Paul needed encouragement from the Lord.

Acts 18:9 And the Lord said to Paul one night in a vision, “Do not be afraid, but go on speaking and do not be silent, 10 for I am with you, and no one will attack you to harm you, for I have many in this city who are my people.”

Paul, afraid? Paul silent? Paul was human. He had needs. Emotional, spiritual, physical needs. He felt a poverty of spirit in being away from his beloved friends at this church. It brought him joy when dear friends came to visit.

Even leaders in ministry need other co-workers who will come along side them, others who understand the unique challenges and hardships of ministry, others who will bring refreshment to their spirits. This is what the coming of these three friends did for Paul, in the midst of something he describes as ‘fighting wild beasts at Ephesus’.

I have a dear friend and co-worker in the gospel who was so deeply hurt in the course of pastoral ministry that he describes it as if something deep inside him broke. He went into a deep depression, to the point where he had to take an extended break from ministry. God is healing him and giving him a renewed sense of vision and passion for ministry. I enjoyed the privilege of spending some time with him over the past week, and he was an encouragement to my soul.

There are some people who sap the spiritual energy out of you; who drain you of life and vitality. There are others whose love for Jesus and love for other people is a contagious overflow that refreshes your soul. Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus were that kind of friends, co-laborers in service to Christ, selfless servants who brought refreshment to everyone they were around. We need those kinds of people in our lives, people who are filled with the love of Christ, those who will just be a friend, who will love us as we are, who will be patient with our flaws and shortcomings, who will laugh with us, cry with us, hurt with us, just be with us, who will lay aside expectations and care for us.

1 Corinthians 16:17 I rejoice at the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus, because they have made up for your absence, 18 for they refreshed my spirit as well as yours. Give recognition to such people.

May we be those kind of people for others. May we refresh the spirit of those who are downcast. May we bring joy to those we are around. May we develop households who addict themselves to the selfless service of the saints. May we create places of refuge where broken sinners can be loved and nurtured and find healing and hope. May we be people who bring joy to our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

July 12, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 16:13-14; Vigilant Steadfast Mature Powerful Love

07/05 1 Corinthians 16:13-14 Vigilant Steadfast Mature Powerful Love; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150705_1cor16_13-14.mp3

1 Corinthians 16 [SBLGNT]

13 Γρηγορεῖτε, στήκετε ἐν τῇ πίστει, ἀνδρίζεσθε, κραταιοῦσθε. 14 πάντα ὑμῶν ἐν ἀγάπῃ γινέσθω.

1 Corinthians 16 [ESV2011]

13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love.

This is Paul’s closing exhortation to the Corinthians. This has been a heavy letter, confronting sin issues and wrong thinking and doctrinal deviance. Here at the end he gives them five concise imperatives for them to hold on to and live by. These are sharp staccato commands. The first four you would expect to come out of the mouth of a military commander before sending his troops into battle.

13 Γρηγορεῖτε, στήκετε… , ἀνδρίζεσθε, κραταιοῦσθε.

Be on guard, stand firm, be men, be strong. These are all present imperatives, commands that require a continuing posture of battle ready alertness and determination. We will take them one by one.

Be Watchful [Γρηγορεῖτε]

Throughout this letter, Paul has held in view the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. He said in his introduction:

1 Corinthians 1:7 …as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ, 8 who will sustain you to the end, guiltless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.

The day of our Lord Jesus Christ is always to be kept in view. Jesus used this word ‘be watchful’ when he warned his followers:

Matthew 24:42 Therefore, stay awake, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming.

The word means more than merely ‘don’t fall asleep’; it is an active vigilant attentiveness. In 1 Corinthians 3 Paul uses the building metaphor of building with perishable or imperishable materials. He says:

1 Corinthians 3:10 … Let each one take care how he builds upon it. …13 each one’s work will become manifest, for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed by fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each one has done.

At the coming of Jesus the enduring quality of your work will be revealed. In the context of church discipline in chapter 5 he says:

1 Corinthians 5:5 you are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

The goal of loving discipline is ultimately salvation when it really matters, when Jesus returns. We are to keep always in mind that we live for another, for the one who bought us with his blood. We are to make it our aim to please him. We are to be ready for his return.

Be on your guard. Be watchful. Stay awake and alert. What kinds of things are we to be watching out for? In chapter 1 he raises the issue of division and disunity. Watch out, be on guard against quarreling, against disunity, against divisions in the body of Christ. In chapters 1 – 4 he warns of the dangers of thinking yourself to be wise and being puffed up with pride. In chapter 5 he warns against the danger of sin being tolerated or even celebrated within the body of Christ. He warns that this has a permeating contaminating effect on the entire body. He warns in chapter 6 he warns against the dangers of greed and sexual immorality, in chapter 7 of the dangers of a desire for circumstances other than what you find yourself in. In chapters 8 – 10 he addresses the danger of injuring a brother by demanding ones own rights and a careless indulgence in Christian liberty. In chapters 11 – 14 he warns against the dangers of selfishness and pride in the worship gatherings of the church. In chapter 15 he warns of the danger of being led astray by false teaching about the gospel. There are dangers without and dangers within. We must be vigilant. We must be on our guard. Peter affirms this in his letter:

1 Peter 5:8 Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. 9 Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brotherhood throughout the world. 10 And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you.

There is an every present danger, and it is never safe to let down your guard.

Stand Firm in the Faith [στήκετε ἐν τῇ πίστει]

Paul exhorts us to stand firm. He adds a qualifying phrase identifying where we are to stand firm. We are to stand firm in the faith. We are to stand firm in the gospel once for all delivered to the saints. He admonished us in the last chapter:

1 Corinthians 15:1 Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, 2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you— unless you believed in vain.

We are to stand firm in the life transforming good news that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures and that he was raised on the third day according to the scriptures. Standing firm means more than simply holding to be true the cold facts of the gospel story. Standing firm means to persistently act in a way consistent with what it means to follow Jesus. The Corinthians were in danger of compromising their conduct in ways that were inconsistent with the gospel. In chapter 6, where the issue is believers indulging in immoral behavior, Paul says:

1 Corinthians 6:19 Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, 20 for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.

In chapter 10, where the issue is participation in idolatry, treasuring or valuing anything or anyone as much as God, he says

1 Corinthians 10:31 So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.

How we eat and drink, what we do with our mind our attitudes, can demonstrate an inconsistency with what we say we believe. We must stand in the truth of the good news and we must be being transformed by it. Paul writes to the church in Phillipi:

Philippians 1:27 Only let your manner of life be worthy of the gospel of Christ, so that whether I come and see you or am absent, I may hear of you that you are standing firm in one spirit, with one mind striving side by side for the faith of the gospel, 28 and not frightened in anything by your opponents. …

Paul writes to the churches in Galatia, and he says:

Galatians 1:6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel—

He exhorts them:

Galatians 5:1 For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery.

Jude writes:

Jude 3 Beloved, although I was very eager to write to you about our common salvation, I found it necessary to write appealing to you to contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints.

We must stand firm in the gospel, we must contend earnestly for it, we must cling tightly to it, we must be transformed by it and live it out. We must hold gospel ground and not retreat before the enemy.

Act Like Men [ἀνδρίζεσθε]

This is a tricky word to translate well. The root of this word is the word used to refer to the male gender. This is challenging, because Paul writes this letter to ‘the church of God …those sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints.’ This clearly includes men and women. Is he calling for the female believers to ‘act like men’? Some translations attempt to avoid this problem by translating it ‘be courageous, be brave, or be valiant’. These are good translations, but they may miss the point. This word is not contrasting maleness with feminine qualities. Both this verb and the related adjective have been used to refer to courageous and valiant characteristics of women (PNTC fn.45). The contrast is more likely between maturity and immaturity. In chapter 3 he addresses their jealousy and strife and says:

1 Corinthians 3:1 But I, brothers, could not address you as spiritual people, but as people of the flesh, as infants in Christ. 2 I fed you with milk, not solid food, for you were not ready for it. And even now you are not yet ready,

In chapter 13, pointing them to the way of love, he says:

1 Corinthians 13:11 When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways.

In chapter 14, he challenges their thinking on the issues of building others up in the local church.

1 Corinthians 14:20 Brothers, do not be children in your thinking. Be infants in evil, but in your thinking be mature.

This is a call to maturity. Do not be immature, childish, petty, self-focused. The Corinthians were in danger of giving in to compromise under the pressure of a pagan society, but he exhorts them to be holy in actions and attitudes.

This also picks up on Old Testament language. Moses exhorted the people who would be led by Joshua:

Deuteronomy 31:6 Be strong and courageous. Do not fear or be in dread of them, for it is the LORD your God who goes with you. He will not leave you or forsake you.”

To be mature or manly is to carry out your duties even in the face of danger and risk. It is not to give in to fear or hopelessness (PNTC). In verse 9 of this chapter we learned that open doors for effective ministry often come with many adversaries, and much maturity and courage is required.

Be Strong [κραταιοῦσθε]

Strength is required to bear up under trials. Throughout this letter there is a contrast between the weak and the strong. Paul proclaimed the good news in plain language so that the cross of Christ would not be emptied of its power. Christ is the wisdom and power of God. In 1:27, “God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong”. Paul came to them in human weakness, knowing nothing among them except Jesus Christ and him crucified. In chapter 8 he draws the contrast between those who think they are wise with those who have weak consciences, who can be led to sin against their consciences by the example of others. Paul says in chapter 9 that to the weak he became weak in order to win the weak. In chapter 12, using the metaphor of the body, he points out that every part is necessary, and the parts who seem to be weaker are indispensable. In chapter 15, he points to our physical bodies in the resurrection that are ‘sown in weakness and raised in power’. Be strong. Do not be strong in your own strength, but be strong in the Lord. In your weakness he is shown to be strong, so faithfully proclaim the seemingly weak and foolish message of the cross. Do not violate your conscience, do not be swayed by others who indulge in questionable things, but hold fast to your convictions. Function in the strength that God supplies so that God gets all the glory.

We see many of these themes repeated and practical instruction given in Ephesians 6.

Ephesians 6:10 Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. 11 Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. 12 For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. 13 Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. 14 Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, 15 and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. 16 In all circumstances take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one; 17 and take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God, 18 praying at all times in the Spirit, with all prayer and supplication. To that end keep alert with all perseverance, making supplication for all the saints,

Let All That You Do Be Done In Love

1 Corinthians 16:13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love.

The powerful military imagery is coupled with and saturated in love. Love is not some wishy-washy ooshy-gooshy soft and cuddly emotion. Love is robust, rigorous, powerful; it clings tenaciously to truth.

Neither is this vigilant, sure footed, courageous, and mighty imagery pictured as crushing and dozing over all in its path. It is to be strength characterized by love. This is a key characteristic that the Corinthians lacked. They lacked love in their divisions, in their quarrels, in their jealousy. They lacked love for Christ and the purity of his church in their tolerance of sin. They lacked love in their lawsuits against one another. They lacked love but instead pursued lust. They had knowledge which puffs up, but they lacked the love which builds up. They lacked love for their weaker brothers for whom Christ died. They lacked love when they demanded their own rights. They lacked love when each went ahead with their own meal and took no though for the poor. They lacked love in their pride over spiritual gifts. They lacked love for the body of Christ. This all climaxes in chapter 13, where Paul points out to them the worthlessness of spiritual gifts or sacrificial service without love. He describes the characteristics of love as patient, kind, not envying or boasting, not arrogant or rude, not self-seeking, not irritable, not keeping record of wrongs done, not rejoicing in wrongdoing, but rejoicing in truth. Love carries a limitless load and endures for limitless duration, it never stops trusting in God or hoping in God. Paul exhorts them to ‘pursue love and seek to build others up.

These verses echo Psalm 31.

Psalm 31:23 Love the LORD, all you his saints! The LORD preserves the faithful but abundantly repays the one who acts in pride. 24 Be strong, and let your heart take courage, all you who wait for the LORD!

Paul says here ‘let all that you do be done in love’. All things, everything is to be done in love. Love is to saturate and permeate everything. Nothing is to be done apart from love. Love for God and love for others.

In 10:31, Paul told us that everything we do is to be done to the glory of God. In 14:26, Paul told us that everything is to be done to build others up. In 14:40 he said that everything should be done decently and in order. Here at the end of the letter, he tells us that everything must be done in love. God is love and the Spirit of God creates love in us. When we love others, we do things for the good of others, we seek their welfare above our own, we seek to build them up. We do things appropriately, in turn, in a decent and orderly way, respecting one another as we seek to build others up. As we love others, seeking not our own interest but the interests of others, to build them up, we demonstrate the love of God that has transformed us, and this brings much glory to our great God. All things are to be done in love, to build others up, for the glory of God.

1 Corinthians 16:13 Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. 14 Let all that you do be done in love.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

July 5, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , | Leave a comment