PastorRodney’s Weblog

Preaching from the Pulpit of Ephraim Church of the Bible

1 Corinthians 13:6; What Love Rejoices In

01/25 1 Corinthians 13:6 What Love Rejoices In; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150125_1cor13_6.mp3

1 Corinthians 13 [SBLGNT]

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ ζηλοῖ ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν, 6 οὐ χαίρει ἐπὶ τῇ ἀδικίᾳ συγχαίρει δὲ τῇ ἀληθείᾳ· 7 πάντα στέγει, πάντα πιστεύει, πάντα ἐλπίζει, πάντα ὑπομένει. 8 Ἡ ἀγάπη οὐδέποτε πίπτει.

1 Corinthians 13 [ESV2011]

12:31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way.

13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing. 4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends...

We are working through 1 Corinthians 13, the love chapter, allowing the wrecking ball of this scathing indictment to rip through our hearts and reveal to us where we are failing to be Christlike, and where we need the transforming power of the Holy Spirit to mold us and shape us into the image of our Lord Jesus.

Life in community with others without God’s love displayed through us to others is empty, vain and worthless. This chapter is intended to be read in the context of the local church, a church made up of individuals with different backgrounds, different gifts, different personalities, different experiences, different tastes, different preferences, who are in different places in society, who have different incomes, who are simply different and sometimes don’t understand one another and who sometimes even hurt and offend each other.

It is in this context of relationships with other people, annoying people, irritating people, people who do wrong things and sin against us, it is in the context of the local church that we are to reflect the character of the God who is love, to take the love with which he has loved us and to extend it to those who sin against us, love that has a long fuse, love that is graciously kind to those who don’t deserve it, love that does not get upset when good things go to someone else, love that does not speak large, does not inflate self to appear more than it is, love that does not act inappropriately or indecently, love that does not seek its own, does not respond to provocation with irritability, does not keep score of wrongs done, does not rejoice in wrongdoing but rejoices with the truth.

This last in a list of eight negatives, which is mirrored by a positive, will be our subject today. What does love rejoice about? Love does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. What can we learn about this from the God who is love? What can we learn from Jesus? What needs to change in us to become more Christlike?

Joy

First, we need to notice that love, real genuine love that reflects God’s love is not cold dead emotionless will to do the loving thing no matter how we feel. In the Christian community we sometimes overreact to error with an opposite and equally deadly error. We see people around us falling in love and just as quickly falling out of love, we hear husbands or wives saying that the love is gone from their relationship, we feel the thrill and appeal of forbidden attraction, and we react. Love is not a feeling, we say. Love is a verb. Love is a choice. You can perform loving acts without feeling some mushy gooshy sentimental attraction for someone. This is a dangerous pendulum swing. It is true that love is not merely emotion or feeling. It is true that love is action. These 15 descriptions of love are all verbs, they look at what love does, what love looks like. But to say that love is not an emotion and that we can do loving acts without feeling love toward a person is Pharisaical and false. As the first three verses of this chapter point out, many people do loving acts without having genuine love in their hearts, and it is worthless and empty. It profits nothing. I can give away all that I have to care for the poor, even give my very life and although people might think of it as a very loving act, the text says that I can do these loving actions and not have love. Love is action, but it is action rooted in and growing out of emotion. Deep, hearty, robust, passionate emotion. Love is evidenced by doing loving acts, but love is more than those actions. This verse makes it clear that love is more than a commitment to doing loving deeds. Love rejoices. Love is all tied up in joy. What it is that we find joy in will show us what we love. If a husband brings his wife a rose, and tells her that he is simply doing what he is expected to do as a husband, not because he wants to, not because he desires to, not because it brings him joy, but because it is the right thing to do, will his wife be pleased with the rose? Will she feel loved? Love is not less than doing loving deeds, but love has everything to do with where those loving deeds come from.

So if you are in that relationship where you are simply going through the motions but there is no emotion, no attraction, no joy, there is hope for you – not outside the relationship but in it. If you look at a fellow believer and know you have a duty to act in a loving manner toward them, but you feel nothing (at least no positive affection), there is hope for you. Remember, this chapter is not a dissertation about the concept of love in the abstract; this is about love toward real people, especially people you don’t naturally get along with, people who may have hurt or wronged or offended you. We must not be content with simply doing the right outward thing toward the one we are supposed to love; we must pursue real rich robust passionate love that takes pleasure in loving the beloved. Our affections, our joy must be involved.

This chapter is a rebuke, a corrective. It is meant to examine us and show us where we fall short. If we have gone through the checklist and passed, if you can say ‘I am patient and kind, I don’t envy or boast, I am not arrogant or rude, I do not seek my own, I am not irritable or resentful… (you are probably not being honest with yourself), but if you can get this far and say ‘I am doing all these things, I do act in a loving way toward others, but I don’t have joy’, then there is a problem. Love rejoices. In real love there is joy, there is pleasure, there is passion, there is delight.

The Joy of God

Let’s look at God’s love to see this. What does God rejoice in? What does God delight in, find joy in?

Jeremiah 9:23 Thus says the LORD: “Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, 24 but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the LORD who practices steadfast love, justice, and righteousness in the earth. For in these things I delight, declares the LORD.”

God takes joy in practicing steadfast love, justice and righteousness in the earth. This is not something he does because he is obligated, but it is what he finds delights in. God delights in all that is right and just and good. Psalm 5 states the opposite.

Psalm 5:4 For you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil may not dwell with you.

God loves justice and righteous. He hates wickedness and will not tolerate evil. The Proverbs lay out the contrast.

Proverbs 11:1 A false balance is an abomination to the LORD, but a just weight is his delight.

Proverbs 11:20 Those of crooked heart are an abomination to the LORD, but those of blameless ways are his delight.

Proverbs 12:22 Lying lips are an abomination to the LORD, but those who act faithfully are his delight.

God takes joy in faithfulness, blamelessness, and justice. He hates lying lips, a crooked heart, and a false balance. He is passionate about what is true and right and good and he must punish evil. But listen to what God says about himself:

Ezekiel 18:23 Have I any pleasure in the death of the wicked, declares the Lord GOD, and not rather that he should turn from his way and live?

Ezekiel 18:32 For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, declares the Lord GOD; so turn, and live.”

Ezekiel 33:11 Say to them, As I live, declares the Lord GOD, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live; turn back, turn back from your evil ways, for why will you die, O house of Israel?

Sometimes we view God as carefully watching, eagerly waiting to see just one mistake so that he can jump on us and punish us for it. This is not God’s heart. God does not delight to destroy wicked people. He will. He is just. But he is eager for the wicked to turn to him so that he can forgive.

1 Timothy 2:3 This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, 4 who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.

Peter tells us:

2 Peter 3:9 The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance.

Jesus said:

Luke 15:7 Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.

God rejoices over every sinner who repents. This is the heart of our great God.

1 Corinthians 13:6 [Love] does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

Jesus and Truth

Jesus was full of truth.

John 1:14 And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.

Jesus was passionate about the truth.

John 8:31 So Jesus said to the Jews who had believed him, “If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples, 32 and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”

Jesus invited people to follow him and to be set free by the truth. Jesus confronted the religious leaders over their lack of love for the truth.

John 8:42 Jesus said to them, “If God were your Father, you would love me, for I came from God and I am here. I came not of my own accord, but he sent me. 43 Why do you not understand what I say? It is because you cannot bear to hear my word. 44 You are of your father the devil, and your will is to do your father’s desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks out of his own character, for he is a liar and the father of lies. 45 But because I tell the truth, you do not believe me. 46 Which one of you convicts me of sin? If I tell the truth, why do you not believe me?47 Whoever is of God hears the words of God. The reason why you do not hear them is that you are not of God.”

Jesus made it very clear what was true.

John 14:6 Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

This is a radical exclusive claim. ‘No one comes to the Father except through me. I am the truth.’

John 18:37 Then Pilate said to him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this purpose I was born and for this purpose I have come into the world— to bear witness to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth listens to my voice.” 38 Pilate said to him, “What is truth?” After he had said this, he went back outside to the Jews and told them, “I find no guilt in him.

Pilate questioned the very existence of truth, and yet he testified to the sinlessness of Jesus. Jesus came into the world to bear witness to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth listens to Jesus.

1 Corinthians 13:6 [Love] does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

Truth or Unrighteousness

We see in I Corinthians 13:6 and consistently in other places in scriptures an interesting contrast. We might expect the contrast to be between truth and falsehood, or between righteousness and unrighteousness, but here we see injustice, unrighteousness, wrongdoing contrasted with truth. We see this also in:

Romans 1:18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. Romans 2:8 but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury.

2 Thessalonians 2:10 and with all wicked [unrighteous] deception for those who are perishing, because they refused to love the truth and so be saved.

2 Thessalonians 2:12 in order that all may be condemned who did not believe the truth but had pleasure in unrighteousness.

Those who are condemned take pleasure in unrighteousness, they are deceived by unrighteousness, they obey unrighteousness, they practice unrighteousness and suppress the truth in unrighteousness. Those who are saved take pleasure in the truth, believe the truth, love the truth, obey the truth, and embrace the truth. Love does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices together with the truth. Where truth is not embraced, obeyed, loved and believed, unrighteousness happens and results in condemnation.

Through this we get a fuller picture of saving faith. Sometimes the gospel is presented this way: ‘Do you believe that Jesus is God, that he became man and died on the cross for your sins? If you do, then you are saved, you are going to heaven.’ James would say, ‘even the demons believe… and shudder’ (James 2:19). The demons believe the facts. They believe them to be true. But they hate the light and will not come to the light. They know who Jesus is, they know the gospel, and they hate it. The kind of believing that results in the gift of eternal life is an embracing of the truth, obeying the truth, loving the truth, rejoicing with the truth. This kind of embracing the truth results in the kind of love that Paul describes for us in this chapter, a love that no longer rejoices in unrighteousness.

1 Corinthians 13:6 [Love] does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

What Was Wrong at Corinth

Paul was rebuking the church at Corinth because they were not rejoicing with the truth; they were rejoicing at unrighteousness. In chapters 1-4 they were delighting in high-sounding worldly wisdom rather than the good news of Christ crucified; in chapter 5 they were boasting about sexual immorality being tolerated in the church. In chapter 6 they were taking one another before unrighteous judges to rip off their brothers, and some even believed it was acceptable for a Christian to indulge in sexual immorality. In chapter 7, wives were defrauding their husbands and husbands their wives by withholding intimacy. In chapter 8-10, they were participating in idolatry. In chapter 11 they were dishonoring one another and humiliating the poor in public worship. In chapters 11-14, they did not recognize the truth of the unity of the body of Christ, and were being disorderly in the worship gathering. They were celebrating unrighteousness. They did not rejoice with the truth.

Tolerance or Truth?

What about us? Do we rejoice in tolerance or in truth? Our society would rewrite this verse ‘love does not rejoice in differentiating between right and wrong, but rejoices in tolerance.’ The greatest sin in our society is to tell someone that they are wrong. ‘If you continue in that belief or behavior and refuse to repent and run to Jesus to be rescued, you will spend eternity in hell.’ Our culture cries out ‘you can’t say that! That’s not a loving thing to say. That’s hate speech’. But love must be truthful. If it is true, and the Bible says it is, it is not loving to nod and smile and act as if everything were okay when your friend or neighbor is careening headlong into an eternity of torment, separated from Christ.

1 Corinthians 6:9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral [involved in pornography], nor idolaters [who treat anyone or anything as more important than God], nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, [active or passive homosexual partners] 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers [physically or verbally abusive], nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God.

We must truly care for people, people created in the image of God, people created to bring him praise. We must care about them more than we care about ourselves, about our reputations, about our freedom. We must care about them enough to tell them the truth. We must tell them about a God who is slow to anger and abounding in loving kindness, who is just and will punish sin, but who rejoices to extend forgiveness to sinners who repent and turn to Jesus.

What do we rejoice in? Do we find pleasure when others get what they deserve? Are we like Jonah, who was eager to see the destruction of his enemies, disappointed when they repented? Love rejoices together with the truth.

2 John 4 I rejoiced greatly to find some of your children walking in the truth, just as we were commanded by the Father.

3 John 3 For I rejoiced greatly when the brothers came and testified to your truth, as indeed you are walking in the truth. 4 I have no greater joy than to hear that my children are walking in the truth.

Our joy must be the joy of God, who does not delight to see wrongs punished, but rather rejoices to see lives transformed by the Holy Spirit.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

Advertisements

January 25, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 13:5d; Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs

01/18 1 Corinthians 13:5d Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150118_1cor13_5d.mp3

1 Corinthians 13 [SBLGNT]

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ ζηλοῖ ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν,

1 Corinthians 13 [ESV2011]

12:31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way.

13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing. 4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends...

We are looking at what love is, what Christian love should look like, what God’s love is like. We look today at the seventh in a list of eight negatives, what love is not. Love is “not …resentful” (ESV)

“thinketh no evil” (KJV)

“keeps no record of wrongs” (NIV)

“does not remember wrongs done against it”(ERV)

“does not keep account of evil” (Phillips)

“does not take into account a wrong suffered” (NASB)

“does not count up wrongs that have been done” (NCV)

“doesn’t keep score of the sins of others” (Message)

“it does not brood over injury” (NABRE)

These translations are all attempting to convey the flavor of the phrase in the original Greek. The main verb in this phrase is [λογίζομαι]; it is an accounting term; it means to take an inventory, to reckon, count, compute, calculate. It is used this way in Romans 4.

Romans 4:4 Now to the one who works, his wages are not counted as a gift but as his due.

Payment is computed, calculated, counted according to debt, according to obligation. How many hours you worked times the agreed upon wage per hour minus any withholding or taxes equals the paycheck.

It means to to count, consider, number. It is used this way in Luke 22

Luke 22:37 For I tell you that this Scripture must be fulfilled in me: ‘And he was numbered with the transgressors.’ For what is written about me has its fulfillment.”

It means to consider, take into account, weigh, meditate on. It is used this way in Mark 11.

Mark 11:31 And they discussed it with one another, saying, “If we say, ‘From heaven,’ he will say, ‘Why then did you not believe him?’

Love does not compute, calculate, count, consider, weigh, meditate on the bad, the evil, the harm.

What does it mean for love to keep no record of wrongs? What does this mean for God, who is love? How do we see this in the face of Jesus, the image of the invisible God? How can we begin to imitate God’s love with the people around us?

God Keeps Records of Wrongs

First, if love keeps no record of wrongs, and if God is love, then we can learn something when we look at what God says about himself in his word. Do we ever see God keeping record of wrongs? Daniel’s vision gives us a glimpse of the end of time.

Daniel 7:9 “As I looked, thrones were placed, and the Ancient of Days took his seat; his clothing was white as snow, and the hair of his head like pure wool; his throne was fiery flames; its wheels were burning fire. 10 A stream of fire issued and came out from before him; a thousand thousands served him, and ten thousand times ten thousand stood before him; the court sat in judgment, and the books were opened.

The books were opened. The court sat in judgment. God has a record book. Hebrews tells us:

Hebrews 4:12 For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. 13 And no creature is hidden from his sight, but all are naked and exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must give account.

All are exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must give account. Nothing is hidden from him. Jesus tells us in Matthew 12:

Matthew 12:36 I tell you, on the day of judgment people will give account for every careless word they speak,

People will give account for every careless word on the day of judgment. There is a day of judgment coming, which means God is keeping record of wrongs. Romans tells us:

Romans 2:5 But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

God’s righteous judgment will be revealed on the day of wrath. We are storing up wrath because of our hard and unrepentant hearts. Every careless word, every thought, every attitude, every deed is recorded and will be accounted for. God keeps books, and the books will be opened. God is just and he will punish all sin. If we know anything about ourselves at all, this is a terrifying prospect.

God has communicated clearly to us his reckoning system. He told Adam in the garden ‘in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die” (Gen.2:17). Romans tells us “The wages of sin is death” (Rom.6:23).

James communicates to us just how comprehensive God’s perfect standard is.

James 2:10 For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become accountable for all of it. 11 For he who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” If you do not commit adultery but do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law.

God doesn’t grade on a curve. God is the lawgiver, and any violation of his law is an offense against him. We find in Romans

Romans 3:19 Now we know that whatever the law says it speaks to those who are under the law, so that every mouth may be stopped, and the whole world may be held accountable to God.

There will be no excuses. No legitimate defense. John tells us:

1 John 1:8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.

God keeps perfect records. God is perfectly righteous. God is absolutely just. Nothing is hidden from him. “All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Rom.3:23)

God Blots Out Transgressions

But thank God this is not the end of the story! How is it that God is love, if God keeps perfect records of wrongs? There are some amazing promises in the Old Testament. God says in Isaiah 43:25

Isaiah 43:25 “I, I am he who blots out your transgressions for my own sake, and I will not remember your sins.

Transgressions blotted out! God keeps perfect record, but if God were willing to blot out that record, to erase it, to eradicate it and strike our sin from his records, to not remember our wrongs – that would be a blessing worth singing about! Listen to David’s prayer in Psalm 51:

Psalm 51:1 Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions. 2 Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin! 3 For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. 4 Against you, you only, have I sinned and done what is evil in your sight, so that you may be justified in your words and blameless in your judgment.

Mercy according to love. God is absolutely just, and he is also abundant in mercy. Wash me, cleanse me, blot out my transgressions.

Listen to Psalm 32. Hear it as if you are hearing it for the first time.

Psalm 32:1 Blessed is the one whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. 2 Blessed is the man against whom the LORD counts no iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no deceit.

Think of this! Transgressions forgiven! Sins covered! Iniquities not computed, not calculated, not counted against me! This Psalm is quoted in Romans 4:7-8, and the word used is [λογίζομαι]. Blessed is the man against whom the LORD counts no iniquity. That is a blessed man indeed! How does that happen? Against whom does the Lord not keep record? Let’s look at Romans 4.

Romans 4:3 For what does the Scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness.” 4 Now to the one who works, his wages are not counted as a gift but as his due. 5 And to the one who does not work but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is counted as righteousness, 6 just as David also speaks of the blessing of the one to whom God counts righteousness apart from works: 7 “Blessed are those whose lawless deeds are forgiven, and whose sins are covered; 8 blessed is the man against whom the Lord will not count his sin.”

Paul tells us that the person against whom the Lord will not count his sins is the person who believes God. “To the one who does not work but believes in him who justifies the ungodly his faith is counted to him as righteousness.” He goes on to clarify what this belief looks like

Romans 4:20 No unbelief made him waver concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, 21 fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. 22 That is why his faith was “counted to him as righteousness.” 23 But the words “it was counted to him” were not written for his sake alone, 24 but for ours also. It will be counted to us who believe in him who raised from the dead Jesus our Lord, 25 who was delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification.

God will do what he promised to do. God is glorified in us when we believe that he will do what he said he would do, when we trust him. God blots out our sins in Jesus, who was delivered up to death for our trespasses. 2 Corinthians 5 says

2 Corinthians 5:19 that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.

God was not counting, not calculating, canceling the record of our trespasses, bringing us into a restored relationship with himself. How could he do this? It says he does it in Christ. Verse 21 tells us how.

2 Corinthians 5:21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

God the Father transferred our sin to Jesus. Jesus, the sinless one, bore our sin in his own body on the cross. This is an accounting term, so let’s use an accounting metaphor to help us understand it. Better yet, let’s use a story Jesus told to help illustrate it.

Matthew 18:23 “Therefore the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his servants. 24 When he began to settle, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents. 25 And since he could not pay, his master ordered him to be sold, with his wife and children and all that he had, and payment to be made.

The King was settling accounts. This servant owed ten thousand talents. A talent, we are told, is a monetary unit equivalent to about 20 years wages for a laborer. So that would be about 200,000 years wages. This servant had been up to something to get himself into that kind of debt with his master. There would be no possible way for him to pay this debt. His master was settling accounts. There were no bankruptcy options. All his possessions were to be sold. He, his wife, and his children were to be sold as a slaves. And that would still fall far short of paying the debt. How can this debt be settled? The king could wait for the servant to work as a slave for 200,000 years to pay him back the debt. That is not what happens in Jesus’ story.

Matthew 18:26 So the servant fell on his knees, imploring him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ 27 And out of pity for him, the master of that servant released him and forgave him the debt.

The master forgave him the debt. He released him from his obligation. But that did not change his books. He would end the year with 200,000 year’s worth of wages missing. That had to come from somewhere. He would have to suffer loss. He would have to absorb that amount himself.

This is a picture of our salvation. We owed a debt we could never pay.

Isaiah 53:5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.

The LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.” “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin.” “in Christ God was …not counting their trespasses against them.” Instead, he counted their trespasses against Christ. He transferred our debt to Jesus. Jesus became guilty for my sin, and he paid the price in full. If I lean into him, trust him, believe in him, God counts righteousness to me. The perfect obedience of Christ is paid into my account. I now stand with my debt of sin paid in full and a positive balance of Christ’s righteousness in my account.

His Forgiveness and Ours

What does this mean for us? Jesus told this story in response to a question from Peter. Jesus had taught his followers to pray “forgive us our debts as we also have forgiven our debtors” (Mt.6:12). Jesus said

Matthew 6:14 For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, 15 but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.

Now Peter asked him “How often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?” (Mt.18:21).

Matthew 18:22 Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times.

And then he tells the story of the master who wished to settle accounts with his servants. The story ends this way:

Matthew 18:26 So the servant fell on his knees, imploring him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ 27 And out of pity for him, the master of that servant released him and forgave him the debt. 28 But when that same servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred denarii, and seizing him, he began to choke him, saying, ‘Pay what you owe.’ 29 So his fellow servant fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.’ 30 He refused and went and put him in prison until he should pay the debt.

The servant whose master had completely forgiven the 200,000 year debt now wanted to settle accounts with his fellow servant who owed him 100 days wages in debt. He who had been shown extravagant mercy refused to show mercy to his fellow servant.

Matthew 18:31 When his fellow servants saw what had taken place, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their master all that had taken place. 32 Then his master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. 33 And should not you have had mercy on your fellow servant, as I had mercy on you?’ 34 And in anger his master delivered him to the jailers, until he should pay all his debt. 35 So also my heavenly Father will do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother from your heart.”

This sounds like God’s forgiveness is conditional. Maybe a better way to say it is that God’s forgiveness is transformational. God’s forgiveness, when received, when truly experienced, will not leave a person unchanged. It will melt a heart of stone. The failure to forgive is simply evidence of a heart that has never truly received God’s forgiveness. If we look back at the servant in the story, we can see indicators of this. When he was pleading with the master, he asked ‘have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ There was a promise to repay. He was not seeking forgiveness, he was seeking an extension on the loan. He wanted more time. He thought he could repay it. When he left the master’s presence, he was still under the weight of the burden of the debt. It seems he still intended to repay it. That would explain his urgency in choking his fellow servant and demanding to be paid. He needed that money to get started paying off his insurmountable debt. To attempt to contribute, even in the smallest way, demonstrates a refusal to receive the gift. It seems he did not understand grace. He remained under law, keeping score, he was still counting. Being truly forgiven, feeling the weight lifted, the debt gone, will stir in us a desire to see that weight lifted for others, to set them free.

David prayed “Against you, you only, have I sinned and done what is evil in your sight” (Ps.51:4). All sin is ultimately against God. When Saul was ravaging the church, the voice from heaven said: “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” When Saul asked ‘who are you Lord?’ “And he said, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.” (Acts 9:4-5). Has someone sinned against you? That sin too is really a sin against God. “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord” (Rom.12:19). When I am wronged by a fellow servant, the offense is against the Master. The debt is against him. If Jesus paid for that debt in full, I have no right to demand payment also. If Jesus paid for my debt and his, it is outrageous of me to expect to be compensated. The records are not mine to keep.

Love keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not take into account a wrong suffered. Love doesn’t keep score of the sins of others. Love does not brood over injury. Love has been set free, and love delights to see others set free. Have you been hurt? Have you been injured? Have you been wronged? Have you been offended? Has evil been done against you? Who do you need to release from their obligation? Who do you need to forgive, to set free?

When God forgives, we are told, he ‘will remember their sin no more’ (Jer.31:34). Can you let it go? Truly, let it go? Release it? Never come back to it? Never rehearse it? Never remind yourself of it? Never remind anyone else of it? Never bring it up again? If your heart has been transformed by Christ, you can. When it begins to rear its ugly head, bring it back to the cross and nail it there. Reckon that sin to have been paid in full. Look afresh at how God in Christ has freely forgiven you, and allow the forgiveness you have experienced to spill out on those who have wronged you. Love keeps no record of wrongs.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

January 18, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 13:5c; Love is Not Irritable

01/11 1 Corinthians 13:5c Love is Not Irritable; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150111_1cor13_5c.mp3

1 Corinthians 13 [SBLGNT]

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ ζηλοῖ ἡ ἀγάπη, οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν,

1 Corinthians 13 [ESV2011]

12:31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way.

13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing. 4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends...

We are in the middle of 1 Corinthians 13, the ‘Love Chapter’. We are looking at what love is, what God’s love is, and learning together about the God who is love. We see this love perfectly displayed in our Lord Jesus Christ, and we also ought to see evidence of this love growing in the lives of the followers of Jesus. That is what this chapter is about. In the context of a church full of people who were all about status, position, importance, thinking each was better than the other, or feeling they were of no significance and didn’t belong, asking what gifts or manifestations were true evidence of advanced spirituality, Paul answers by saying that all the tongues speaking, all the prophesying, all the faith in the world amounts to nothing, reduces the speaker to nothing, and will gain us nothing of eternal significance without love. Love is long-tempered. Love is kind. Love is not jealous. Love does not boast or puff up self. Love is not rude. Love does not seek its own. Love is not irritable. Love does not keep records of wrongs done. Love does not rejoice at wrongdoings, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears and believes and hopes and endures. This is the kind of love God has, the kind of love Jesus displayed as the image of the invisible God, and this is the kind of love that the Holy Spirit produces in the life of the follower of Jesus. The fruit of the Spirit is love. This kind of love is the primary evidence for those who are truly spiritual.

So this chapter is a rebuke. The Corinthians lacked love. They were the opposite of all these things. The Corinthians were impatient, unkind, envious, braggarts, puffed up, indecent, self-seeking, irritable, and they held grudges. Paul was humbling them, pointing them to the way of love, pointing them to the utter worthlessness of their spiritual giftedness without God’s love at work among them.

Today we look at the sixth in a list of eight negatives, describing what love is not. The ESV translates this ‘not irritable’; (NIV) ‘not easily angered’; (KJV) ‘not easily provoked’; (ISV) ‘never …gets annoyed’; (Phillips) ‘not touchy’.

Passive

This is a passive verb, indicating not something that I do (that would be an active verb), but how I respond when someone does something to me. This does not have to do with if I provoke others, but how I respond when others provoke or irritate me. ‘If only people would stop irritating me, I wouldn’t get so angry!’ I am on the receiving end of provocation. This assumes that there will be provocation. People will provoke me. Circumstances will irritate me. Things will annoy me. That is not the problem, and the solution is not to eliminate the annoyances. The problem is in me. The problem is with how I respond. Jesus promised his followers “in the world you will have tribulation [pressure, affliction, distress]” (Jn.16:33). That is unavoidable. But Jesus offers in the midst of the pressure “that in me you may have peace.”

Irritable Corinthians

So what does it mean that love is not irritable? How were the Corinthians acting irritably? How is God who is love not irritable? What can we learn from Jesus about not being irritable?

1 Corinthians 13:4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;

The Corinthians were irritable. They were easily provoked. We see that from how they conducted themselves. There was quarreling, dissension, disputes, jealousy, strife. There was boasting, some thought more highly of themselves than they ought to think, puffed up, thinking they were wise and powerful and important, who didn’t think they needed anyone else. Others felt pushed down, trampled, unimportant, undervalued, they were easily offended. They were all eager to insist on their own rights, demanding what was their due, even if that meant taking one another to the courts of law to settle disputes. This is not the way of love.

God’s Righteous Provocation

If love is not irritable, not provoked, then we should be able to look at the God who defines love to see more clearly what this does and doesn’t mean. When we look to the Old Testament, we find something interesting.

Psalm 7:11 God is a righteous judge, and a God who feels indignation every day. 12 If a man does not repent, God will whet his sword; he has bent and readied his bow; 13 he has prepared for him his deadly weapons, making his arrows fiery shafts.

God feels indignation every day. This does not sound like a God who is not provoked. In fact, we find God provoked frequently through the scriptures. Listen to Deuteronomy 9, where Moses warns the people against provoking the Lord.

Deuteronomy 9:6 “Know, therefore, that the LORD your God is not giving you this good land to possess because of your righteousness, for you are a stubborn people. 7 Remember and do not forget how you provoked the LORD your God to wrath in the wilderness. From the day you came out of the land of Egypt until you came to this place, you have been rebellious against the LORD. 8 Even at Horeb you provoked the LORD to wrath, and the LORD was so angry with you that he was ready to destroy you.

…12 Then the LORD said to me, ‘Arise, go down quickly from here, for your people whom you have brought from Egypt have acted corruptly. They have turned aside quickly out of the way that I commanded them; they have made themselves a metal image.’ 13 “Furthermore, the LORD said to me, ‘I have seen this people, and behold, it is a stubborn people. 14 Let me alone, that I may destroy them and blot out their name from under heaven. And I will make of you a nation mightier and greater than they.’

…18 Then I lay prostrate before the LORD as before, forty days and forty nights. I neither ate bread nor drank water, because of all the sin that you had committed, in doing what was evil in the sight of the LORD to provoke him to anger. 19 For I was afraid of the anger and hot displeasure that the LORD bore against you, so that he was ready to destroy you. But the LORD listened to me that time also.

…22 “At Taberah also, and at Massah and at Kibroth-hattaavah you provoked the LORD to wrath.

It sounds like the God who is love is at times provoked to anger and wrath. If God is love, then there must be a righteous and loving kind of provocation as well as an evil and unloving kind of provocation.

Deuteronomy 32:16 They stirred him to jealousy with strange gods; with abominations they provoked him to anger. 17 They sacrificed to demons that were no gods, to gods they had never known, to new gods that had come recently, whom your fathers had never dreaded. 18 You were unmindful of the Rock that bore you, and you forgot the God who gave you birth.

God is provoked to anger when his people whom he loves and cares for turn away from him, the only source of life and joy and run after false hopes that will fail to satisfy. He is provoked to anger because he loves his people, he wants what is best for them, and he knows that he alone is best for them. Even at the disobedience of his people, God is patient. Nehemiah prays:

Nehemiah 9:17 They refused to obey and were not mindful of the wonders that you performed among them, but they stiffened their neck and appointed a leader to return to their slavery in Egypt. But you are a God ready to forgive, gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, and did not forsake them. 18 Even when they had made for themselves a golden calf and said, ‘This is your God who brought you up out of Egypt,’ and had committed great blasphemies, 19 you in your great mercies did not forsake them in the wilderness. The pillar of cloud to lead them in the way did not depart from them by day, nor the pillar of fire by night to light for them the way by which they should go. 20 You gave your good Spirit to instruct them and did not withhold your manna from their mouth and gave them water for their thirst. 21 Forty years you sustained them in the wilderness, and they lacked nothing. Their clothes did not wear out and their feet did not swell.

God can be provoked, but he is slow to anger. He is patient, he is great in mercy, he is abounding in steadfast love.

Provocation of Jesus

When we look to Jesus, who is the image of the invisible God, we see him reflect the same kinds of things. In John 2,

John 2:14 In the temple he found those who were selling oxen and sheep and pigeons, and the money-changers sitting there. 15 And making a whip of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and oxen. And he poured out the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables. 16 And he told those who sold the pigeons, “Take these things away; do not make my Father’s house a house of trade.” 17 His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.”

Jesus was provoked. He was passionate. He was rightly irritated and offended by people seeking to make a profit off of those who had come to seek God.

In Mark 3, the Pharisees had set Jesus up. They were using a crippled person – using him to test Jesus.

Mark 3:1 Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there with a withered hand. 2 And they watched Jesus, to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him. 3 And he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” 4 And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” But they were silent. 5 And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored.

Notice Jesus’ response. He was provoked. He attempted to reason with them. They were callous. He was provoked to wrath. Wrath and sorrow. He was grieved and angry. Angry at their insensitivity to the needs of a person. Grieved at their callousness to the truth of God, their hardened refusal to consider that he might indeed be who he claimed to be. They set him up, and Jesus was angry and grieved, and he healed the man. And the Pharisees conspired to kill him.

His Provocation and Ours

When we look at Jesus, we begin to see some of the differences between God’s perfect, loving provocation, and our sinful selfish provocation. God is provoked when we seek satisfaction in things that will bring only harm and heartache. Jesus was provoked when God was dishonored and people were hurt. Jesus was provoked when people were more interested in self-preservation and their own agenda than the good of hurting people and the glory of God.

We are irritated when things don’t go our way, when we are inconvenienced, when we are hurt, when our plans are thwarted. We are provoked when people are thoughtless or unkind toward us. We want to defend ourselves, our ideas, our reputation, our honor. Anthony Thiselton describes our irritability as a “readiness to overreact on one’s own behalf.” He describes a provocation that “takes offense because one’s self-regard has been dented, wounded, or punctured by some sharp point” (NIGTC, p.1052). Our irritability is rooted in selfishness, which is the opposite of love. He also points out how these characteristics of love work together. Love is patient, or long-tempered. Love does not seek its own. “patience delays exasperation … and …lack of self-interest diverts a sense of self-importance away from reacting on the grounds of wounded pride” (NIGTC, p.1052).

Jesus is Not Irritable

We look to Jesus for an example of a selfless life surrendered to pursuing passionately the purposes of God, and how to respond to people and circumstances and things that bring irritation and provocation.

Interruptions

How do you respond when you have purpose, when you are on mission, when you are doing what you are supposed to be doing, when you are moving forward, going in the right direction, and someone comes along with an interruption and derails you? How do you respond to interruption? Do you respond with irritation, with frustration, with anger? In Mark 5, Jesus was on mission. He had been summoned by a desperate father whose daughter was dying. He was going to help someone. What he was doing was very important. But he was rudely and inappropriately interrupted.

Mark 5:22 Then came one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name, and seeing him, he fell at his feet 23 and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well and live.” 24 And he went with him. And a great crowd followed him and thronged about him. 25 And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, 26 and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. 27 She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. 28 For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” 29 And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. 30 And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” 31 And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?’” 32 And he looked around to see who had done it. 33 But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. 34 And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.” 35 While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?”

This delay was not only inconvenient, poorly timed, and inappropriate, but the delay caused the death of the girl he had set out to heal. He was derailed. How would you respond to this kind of interruption? How did Jesus respond to it? He allowed the interruption. He embraced it. He stopped. He turned. He took the time to identify the one who had interrupted him, to address her. He treated her with kindness and compassion. He cared for her needs. This unplanned interruption served to exaggerate the glory of God as the planned healing escalated into a full-on resurrection from the dead!

Distractions

How do you respond when you have been called to big things, when you are doing important things, and something small and trivial gets in your way? Distractions, diversions, inconsequential things, inconveniences that steal precious time away from the great task at hand. How do you respond to the trivial interruptions of life? In Mark 10, Jesus’ disciples were trying to do a good thing. They were trying to protect Jesus’ time. He had come for great things, he was teaching the multitudes, so they attempted to intercept the insignificant distractions so that he could focus on the more important things.

Mark 10:13 And they were bringing children to him that he might touch them, and the disciples rebuked them. 14 But when Jesus saw it, he was indignant and said to them, “Let the children come to me; do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God. 15 Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” 16 And he took them in his arms and blessed them, laying his hands on them.

Jesus was indignant, not that people would be so trivial as to bring their little kids to him to get him to touch them, but because the disciples were turning them away. He embraced these distractions. These distractions were people, and he took time to show them love and affection, to bless them.

Impositions

How do you respond to impositions? You have been going and going, serving and pouring out, to the point that you are exhausted, even neglecting your own basic needs. You need to get away. You need time alone. You need rest. You just need a break. And just as you are about to take some precious time to yourself, someone drops in on you. Someone who is needy. Someone who is self-centered. Someone who wants to take from you. Uninvited, unwelcome impositions. How do you respond? In Mark 6, Jesus responds to uninvited impositions.

Mark 6:30 The apostles returned to Jesus and told him all that they had done and taught. 31 And he said to them, “Come away by yourselves to a desolate place and rest a while.” For many were coming and going, and they had no leisure even to eat. 32 And they went away in the boat to a desolate place by themselves. 33 Now many saw them going and recognized them, and they ran there on foot from all the towns and got there ahead of them. 34 When he went ashore he saw a great crowd, and he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. And he began to teach them many things. 35 And when it grew late, his disciples came to him and said, “This is a desolate place, and the hour is now late. 36 Send them away to go into the surrounding countryside and villages and buy themselves something to eat.” 37 But he answered them, “You give them something to eat.” And they said to him, “Shall we go and buy two hundred denarii worth of bread and give it to them to eat?”

Jesus was looking for private time, isolated time, time away from the crowds, time by themselves, time to rest. But the crowds chased him down. They horned their way in on what was supposed to be rest and leisure. How did Jesus respond? He had compassion on them. He saw their hurts, their needs. They were like sheep without a shepherd. He embraced the imposition. He invested in them. And he refused to send them away hungry. He poured into them spiritually, and he cared for them physically. He fed them as much as they could eat. And there was still plenty left over for his disciples. They were satisfied, and God was glorified.

Irresponsibility

How do you respond when you give a trusted friend a simple task and they utterly fail you? A small thing, an easy thing, but an important thing. And they drop the ball and leave you hanging? Do you cut them off? One time and that’s it. I’ll never trust you again. In Mark 14, Jesus gave some of his closest friends a very simple but important job.

Mark 14:32 And they went to a place called Gethsemane. And he said to his disciples, “Sit here while I pray.” 33 And he took with him Peter and James and John, and began to be greatly distressed and troubled. 34 And he said to them, “My soul is very sorrowful, even to death. Remain here and watch.” 35 And going a little farther, he fell on the ground and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from him. 36 And he said, “Abba, Father, all things are possible for you. Remove this cup from me. Yet not what I will, but what you will.” 37 And he came and found them sleeping, and he said to Peter, “Simon, are you asleep? Could you not watch one hour? 38 Watch and pray that you may not enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.” 39 And again he went away and prayed, saying the same words. 40 And again he came and found them sleeping, for their eyes were very heavy, and they did not know what to answer him. 41 And he came the third time and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and taking your rest? It is enough; the hour has come. The Son of Man is betrayed into the hands of sinners. 42 Rise, let us be going; see, my betrayer is at hand.”

Watch. Pray. Simple things in his hour of greatest need, and they failed him. They fell asleep. He gave them three opportunities. They failed every time. He didn’t become angry. He didn’t write them off. In his hour of need, he challenged them, he instructed them, he cared for their needs. After his resurrection he pursued them and entrusted them with the greatest commission of being his witnesses and changing the world.

Intentional Offense

But what about intentional offenses? What if someone is really out to hurt you, out to injure you, out to do you harm? What do you do when you know that there is malicious intent? How do you react? How did Jesus react? The prophet Isaiah foretells it this way:

Isaiah 50:6 I gave my back to those who strike, and my cheeks to those who pull out the beard; I hid not my face from disgrace and spitting.

Isaiah 53:7 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he opened not his mouth.

Peter holds Jesus up as an example for us:

1 Peter 2:21 For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you might follow in his steps. 22 He committed no sin, neither was deceit found in his mouth. 23 When he was reviled, he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten, but continued entrusting himself to him who judges justly.

Jesus instructs us:

Luke 6:27 “But I say to you who hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. 29 To one who strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also, and from one who takes away your cloak do not withhold your tunic either. 30 Give to everyone who begs from you, and from one who takes away your goods do not demand them back. 31 And as you wish that others would do to you, do so to them.

What kind of love is this? What kind of love is so selfless that it is not irritable, not resentful, not provoked to anger? What kind of love loves enemies? God’s love. While we were his enemies, God demonstrated his love for us (Rom.5:8-10). Having been loved like this, the Holy Spirit now works this kind of love in us. We can only love like this when we have first been filled to overflowing with his love.

I am not my own. I have been bought with a price. I am a slave sent to do my Master’s bidding. So I love because he first loved me.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

January 11, 2015 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Devoted To Prayer

01/04 Devoted To Prayer; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20150104_devoted-to-prayer.mp3

As I began my readings for the new year, a word in Acts 1 intrigued me. It is translated ‘were devoting themselves to’

The Greek word behind the English ‘devoted to’ is [προσκαρτερέω proskartereo]. Here is how some of the dictionaries define it:

[Mickelson’s Enhanced Strong’s Greek and Hebrew Dictionaries]

G4342 προσκαρτερέω proskartereo (pros-kar-ter-eh’-o) v.

1. to be earnest towards

2. (to a thing) to persevere, be constantly diligent

3. (in a place) to attend assiduously all the exercises

4. (to a person) to adhere closely to (as a servitor)

[from G4314πρός pros (pros’) prep.1. forward to, i.e. toward and G2594 καρτερέω kartereo (kar-ter-eh’-o) v.1. to be strong 2. (figuratively) to endure]

[Thayer] – Original: προσκαρτερέω; Transliteration: Proskartereo; Phonetic: pros-kar-ter-eh’-o

– Definition:

1. to adhere to one, be his adherent, to be devoted or constant to one

2. to be steadfastly attentive unto, to give unremitting care to a thing

3. to continue all the time in a place

4. to persevere and not to faint

5. to show one’s self courageous for

6. to be in constant readiness for one, wait on constantly

This is a strong word. It appears only 10 times in the New Testament. What is it that the early believers were devoted to, what were they earnest toward or constantly diligent or steadfastly attentive to; what is it they gave their unremitting care to? As we evaluate the successes and failures of a past year and look forward to a new year and seek to re-prioritize and re-purpose for the new year, it would do us well to look to what the early church was passionately committed to. Twice we find this word connected to another word. In Acts 1:14 and in Acts 2:46 we find the word translated ‘devoted to’ with the word [ὁμοθυμαδόν homothumadon], which is translated ‘together’ or ‘with one accord’ or ‘with one mind’

[Mickelson’s Enhanced Strong’s Greek and Hebrew Dictionaries]

G3661 ὁμοθυμαδόν homothumadon (hom-oth-oo-mad-on’) adv.

1. unanimously

[adverb from a compound of the base of G3674 and G2372]

Whatever it is that the early church was unanimously constantly diligent and steadfastly attentive to, is probably important for us to resolve to devote ourselves to as well.

Let’s look at some of the verses, see if we can pick up some themes, and think together about what we should do about it.

Acts 1:14 All these with one accord were devoting themselves to prayer, together with the women and Mary the mother of Jesus, and his brothers.

The early believers unanimously constantly diligent in prayer. Acts 2:42 adds three things to prayer.

Acts 2:42 And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

They were earnest towards the apostles teaching, fellowship, breaking bread and prayers.

Acts 2:46 has both of these words together.

[ESV] Acts 2:46 And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes, they received their food with glad and generous hearts,

It comes through more clearly in the Lexham English Bible, another literal translation.

[LEB] Acts 2:46 And every day, devoting themselves to meeting with one purpose in the temple courts and breaking bread from house to house, they were eating their food with joy and simplicity of heart,

They unanimously gathered to meet together in public, and they gathered in homes to break bread and to eat together. The next verse is telling.

Acts 2:47 praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to their number day by day those who were being saved.

As the early church was passionately committed to these things, God was saving people and connecting them with the growing church. There seems to be a connection between the unanimous devotion of the believers and the fruitfulness of the gospel in their communities.

Here is why the Apostles appointed others to oversee the charitable activities of the church:

Acts 6:2 …“It is not right that we should give up preaching the word of God to serve tables. …4 But we will devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word.”

The same word is used in Romans 12 and Colossians 4.

Romans 12:12 Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.

Colossians 4:2 Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.

So we see repeatedly that the early church devoted themselves to prayer. We also see that they devoted themselves to preaching and hearing the word, to breaking bread, to fellowship, to eating together. If these are things the early Christians were earnestly and unanimously devoted to, these are things we to ought to be faithfully passionate about.

Why These Things?

But why have the followers of Jesus throughout history been committed to hearing and teaching the word, to table fellowship with the believers, to remembering Jesus in the breaking of bread, and primarily to prayer? What is it about these things that captured the heart and the attention of the church? What is it about prayer that is so clearly foundational and central to the Christian life?

Prayer

First, what is prayer? Simply put, prayer is our communication with God. When we address God with worship, with thanksgiving, with confession, with requests, that is prayer. Prayer is our side of communication with God. Jesus had much to say about prayer. He exhorted his disciples to pray, he taught them how to pray (and how not to pray), he told them parables about prayer, and he modeled for them a life devoted to prayer.

Prayer, the way Jesus taught it, is humbling. If you think of the four aspects of prayer, worship is telling God how awesome he is, that he is greater than all else, including me. Worship is telling God all the things I admire about him, most of which are not true of me, and those things that are true of me in some degree are true in me only in an imperfect and flawed reflection of who he is. Worship is turning my attention away from me an to God, paying attention to him, celebrating and enjoying him for who he is. Confession is agreeing with God about the perfect standard and acknowledging how far I fall short of that standard. Thanksgiving is looking at the good things he gives that I don’t deserve and couldn’t earn and expressing gratitude as a humble recipient of great and glorious gifts. Requests are an expression of my need and his overwhelming generosity, of my emptiness and his fullness, of my brokenness and his wholeness, of my lack and his infinite supply. Being devoted to prayer means being constantly humbled in his presence.

And yet the privilege of prayer is amazing beyond comprehension. I can approach the all holy God in prayer because he so loved me that he gave his only Son to die in my place, pay my price, and purchase me as his own prized possession. Jesus opened to me the way of prayer through his own blood. I have been forgiven and cleansed and made new, and I can stand before him as a saint, a holy one. I have been adopted into the family of God, and can now address him as Father. He has taken me into his confidence, and I can address him as Friend. I have been granted bold access to the throne of grace. That is a humbling amazing reality that I am reminded of when I pray.

Prayer is our necessary connection to Jesus. Jesus used the metaphor of a vine with branches. He said:

John 15:4 Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me. 5 I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing. 6 If anyone does not abide in me he is thrown away like a branch and withers; and the branches are gathered, thrown into the fire, and burned. 7 If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. 8 By this my Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit and so prove to be my disciples.

We must stay constantly connected to Jesus in order to be alive and to bear fruit. The circulatory system must carry away waste and deliver nutrients to the branch and or the branch will die. We are to pray as if our life depended on it, because it does! We are to be devoted to prayer. A branch disconnected from the root will not last long. Prayer is to be as natural and constant as breathing; taking in life giving oxygen, exhaling to carry away dangerous waste. Our connection with Jesus is directly related to our life and fruitfulness. A Christian who is not constantly connected with Jesus will not grow or produce fruit.

The Apostles,

Acts 1:13 …Peter and John and James and Andrew, Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus and Simon the Zealot and Judas the son of James. 14 All these with one accord were devoting themselves to prayer, together with the women and Mary the mother of Jesus, and his brothers.

These men had been with Jesus. When Jesus had called them to follow him, they gladly left everything. They enjoyed being with him. They had spent time with Jesus. Jesus had poured into them, invested in them, spent time with them. He taught them, trained them, answered their questions, calmed their fears, assuaged their doubts, prepared them for the future. When Jesus told them that he was going away, ‘sorrow filled their hearts’ (Jn.16:6). They wanted nothing more than to be with Jesus. They longed to spend time in his company, being part of what he was doing, remaining connected. Jesus said:

John 16:22 So also you have sorrow now, but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you. …24 Until now you have asked nothing in my name. Ask, and you will receive, that your joy may be full.

Jesus was crucified and his disciples scattered. But he rose from the dead and appeared to his disciples. Their hearts rejoiced and no one could take their joy. Before Jesus ascended bodily to the right hand of his Father, he said

Matthew 28:20 …And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

We abide in Jesus, we maintain that intimate connection with Jesus through prayer, through worship, confession, thanksgiving and requests. We depend on him. Apart from him we can do nothing. If we abide in him and his word abides in us, we will bear much fruit.

The Word

Our side of the communication is called prayer. God’s side of the communication is called divine revelation, and this happens primarily through the preaching and hearing of the word. This is why we see an unswerving commitment to the proclamation of biblical truth among the followers of Jesus. We want his word to abide in us. Jesus said to the religious leaders,

John 5:39 You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.

The Apostles were Jews who had heard the Scriptures read all their lives. But they had met Jesus, and he created in them a new appetite for God’s word. When Jesus appeared to his disciples,

Luke 24:27 And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.

Luke 24:45 Then he opened their minds to understand the Scriptures,

Because we have been with Jesus, because we have experienced him as the Word made flesh, we have a new appetite for Jesus, a hunger for his words. We want to hear him speak. His words are life and they are light. We are to be devoted to, steadfastly attentive to the Apostles’ teaching.

The Gospel

The early followers were devoted to the breaking of bread. Jesus broke bread and said ‘do this in remembrance of me’ (Lk.22:19). Remembering Jesus by breaking bread is a way to keep our eyes fixed on the gospel. We must not lose sight of the gospel, the good news that Jesus died to save sinners. Jesus took bread.

1 Corinthians 11:24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.”

Jesus intended for us to remember him by breaking bread together. The early church was constantly diligent to break bread together. We too, should be devoted to the breaking of bread whereby we remember Jesus and keep our focus on the gospel.

Table Fellowship

The early church was devoted to fellowship. They ate together. They took food with joy and simplicity of heart. They ate at one another’s homes. Why eating together? The Corinthian church was rebuked for the way they ate together, each one going ahead with his own meal, not sharing and not waiting for one another. The purpose is not food, the purpose is building relationships. Eating together with joy and thankfulness is a way to build relationships. Having a meal together is a way of loving one another, and it can be a way to care for the needy. Discipleship, as Jesus did it, happened through the daily routines of life, walking, talking, traveling, fishing, eating, spending time caring for broken hurting people. The early church was devoted to table fellowship because our vertical relationship with God must bend outward to other people. Jesus said:

John 13:34 A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

The early disciples were earnest toward eating together as an expression of love. We too must be devoted to fellowship with other believers.

Devoted to Unity in Community

The early church was unanimous in their devotion to fellowship, breaking bread, the word and prayer. These were not only individual exercises. They were together devoted – praying together, listening together ‘with one accord’, eating together, ‘house to house’. The early church was devoted to unity in the context of community. They were together in public, and they were together in their homes. The early church valued one another. Their relationship with Jesus found expression in their attitudes and actions toward one another.

Hindrances to Unanimous Devotion

Why aren’t we devoted to the same things that the followers of Jesus passionately committed themselves to? What keeps us from being earnest toward the things of Christ? If we can identify some of the things that prevent our devotion to Christ, we can begin to weed them out and cultivate a deeper devotion to the things that we are called to be devoted to.

We live in an individualistic society. Our culture does not encourage us to spend time face to face with other human beings, interacting, doing things together, caring for one another, being involved in the lives of others. We have been trained with a consumer worldview, where we ask the question ‘what can I get out of this’ and ‘how does this benefit me’ rather than, ‘what can I give’ and ‘how can I benefit others?’ If we can root out the individualism and self-focus that prevents us from living in genuine community with others, we will be more free to devote ourselves to these things.

Sin clearly will hinder us from being devoted to the things of Christ. When we fill our souls with counterfeit food, we ruin our appetites for that which gives life. Our desires need to be transformed. We have an empty gaping hole in our souls, and we seek to cram it full of stuff to satisfy our longings. We need to unpack the junk so that we can recognize that our true longings can only be satisfied by a relationship with God. When we crowd our lives with busyness we are simply being pulled in too many directions to be devoted to anything. When we fill our lives with noise, it drowns out any opportunity to listen to his voice. We need to take a hard look. Some things may have to go so that we can devote ourselves to prayer, to the word, to the gospel, to love.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

January 4, 2015 Posted by | occasional, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment