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1 Corinthians 12:4-6; Distributions of the Triune God

08/31 1 Corinthians 12:4-6 Distributions of the Triune God;Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140831_1cor12_4-6.mp3

1 Corinthians 12 [SBLGNT]

1 Περὶ δὲ τῶν πνευματικῶν, ἀδελφοί, οὐ θέλω ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν. 2 οἴδατε ὅτι ὅτε ἔθνη ἦτε πρὸς τὰ εἴδωλα τὰ ἄφωνα ὡς ἂν ἤγεσθε ἀπαγόμενοι. 3 διὸ γνωρίζω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐδεὶς ἐν πνεύματι θεοῦ λαλῶν λέγει· Ἀνάθεμα Ἰησοῦς, καὶ οὐδεὶς δύναται εἰπεῖν· Κύριος Ἰησοῦς εἰ μὴ ἐν πνεύματι ἁγίῳ.

4 Διαιρέσεις δὲ χαρισμάτων εἰσίν, τὸ δὲ αὐτὸ πνεῦμα· 5 καὶ διαιρέσεις διακονιῶν εἰσιν, καὶ ὁ αὐτὸς κύριος· 6 καὶ διαιρέσεις ἐνεργημάτων εἰσίν, ὁ δὲ αὐτὸς θεός, ὁ ἐνεργῶν τὰ πάντα ἐν πᾶσιν. 7 ἑκάστῳ δὲ δίδοται ἡ φανέρωσις τοῦ πνεύματος πρὸς τὸ συμφέρον.

1 Corinthians 12 [ESV2011]

1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

4 Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5 and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; 6 and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone. 7 To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. 8 For to one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, 9 to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, 10 to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. 11 All these are empowered by one and the same Spirit, who apportions to each one individually as he wills.

Paul is addressing a new topic, the topic of who is spiritual, of what distinguishes someone as a spiritual person. The Corinthians, who were all about status and position, impressing others and being thought well of, emphasized the more dramatic and showy manifestations of the Spirit like the supernatural ability to speak in an unknown language. Paul brings them back to the basics of the gospel again, reminding them that all of humanity falls into only two categories, those who are being saved and those who are perishing (1:18); those who serve idols and those who worship Jesus and own him as their King. Authentic belief in Jesus as Lord is evidence of the Spirit’s work in the heart, because “no one can say ‘Jesus is Lord’ except in the Holy Spirit.” Paul says in Romans 8:

Romans 8:9 You, however, are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him.

Everyone who belongs to Christ has the Holy Spirit, and is therefore spiritual. The confession of faith ‘Jesus is Lord’ is enabled by the Spirit. So there can be no ranking of believers within the body of Christ as to who is more spiritual or less spiritual, because by Paul’s definition of spiritual, all those and only those who are indwelt by the Holy Spirit are spiritual.

Spirituals and Grace-gifts

In the next verses, Paul looks at the various distributions of gifts to individual believers. Where in verse 1, Paul used the Corinthians’ word [πνευματικῶν] ‘spiritual ones’ or ‘spiritual things’, focusing the attention on the status of the one who possessed a specific manifestation of the Spirit as spiritual, in verse 4, Paul changes to a different word [ χαρισμάτων] ‘grace-gift’, which shifts the focus to the giver and the free and undeserved nature of the gifts. This word has its roots in the word ‘grace’; a free and undeserved freely given gift. Paul used this word back in chapter 1 when he said:

1 Corinthians 1:4 I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that was given you in Christ Jesus, 5 that in every way you were enriched in him in all speech and all knowledge— …7 so that you are not lacking in any gift,

Because of the grace of God given to you, you were enriched in him and lack no grace-gift from him.

He uses this word again in chapter 7, referring to the gift of self-control in singleness and the gift of marriage.

1 Corinthians 7:7 …each has his own gift from God, one of one kind and one of another.

In Romans 12, as here in 1 Corinthians 12, he uses this word to refer to the free gifts of divine enabling by the Spirit.

Romans 12:6 Having gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us use them:

These are grace-gifts, they are given to us freely by God’s undeserved grace. Peter uses it the same way in 1 Peter 4:10.

1 Peter 4:10 As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God’s varied grace:

Grace-gifts are something we have received, they are a grace-gift, and they come to us through God’s multifaceted unearned favor. In Romans 5 and 6, Paul points to justification and eternal life as a grace-gift from God.

Romans 6:23 For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Notice the contrast between what is earned and what is freely given. The Corinthians wanted to boast about their spirituality, as if certain gifts were evidence of higher spiritual achievement. Paul undercuts their boasting by pointing to the free and undeserved nature of God’s grace, who freely gives good thing to the undeserving.

Varieties or Distributions

1 Corinthians 12:4 Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5 and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; 6 and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone.

Paul highlights the various distribution of these grace-gifts three times in this passage. The verbal form of the word translated ‘varieties’ is translated ‘apportions’ in verse 11:

1 Corinthians 12:11 All these are empowered by one and the same Spirit, who apportions to each one individually as he wills.

The word means to separate or distribute, and the focus is on the freedom of the Spirit to apportion or distribute what he wants to whom he wants. The emphasis of the context is on the sovereign distribution of various gifts to various individuals more than on the multiplicity of the gifts. There is a distinction arising from different distribution to different persons (Thayer). We could translate: ‘there are distributions of grace-gifts, …distributions of services, …distributions of activities …the same Spirit who distributes to each one individually as he wills’.

Gifts, Services, Activities

1 Corinthians 12:4 Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5 and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; 6 and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone.

Paul uses three words to describe the gifts of the Spirit. He calls them grace-gifts, services, and activities. We have already looked at ‘grace-gifts’ as pointing to the free and undeserved nature of the gifts.

The word ‘service’ or ministry is used in different ways. Sometimes it is used of serving food to the needy, sometimes of delivering money to the poor, sometimes of delivering the gospel to sinners. The root of this word is where we get our English word ‘deacon’, which is a servant or a minister. There are various distributions of of services, some that minister to physical needs, some that minister to financial needs, some that minister to spiritual needs. Services shifts the focus to the others-centered nature of the gifts.

There are distributions of activities. The word ‘activities’ and the word ’empowers’ later in this verse are the noun and verb forms of the same word [ἐνεργέω], where we get our word ‘energy’. It means ‘activity, effect, operation, that which is worked’. There are different things that are powerfully worked, but the power for working comes from God. There are various distributions of energies, but it is the same God who energizes them all in all.

Energies Energized by God

In Philippians 2 we are told to ‘work our your own salvation with fear and trembling’

Philippians 2:13 for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.

It is God’s working in us which causes our work to be effective and well pleasing to him. In Colossians 1, Paul speaks of the ministry he was given to make the word of God fully know, the mystery of Christ in you. He says:

Colossians 1:28 Him we proclaim, warning everyone and teaching everyone with all wisdom, that we may present everyone mature in Christ. 29 For this I toil, struggling with all his energy that he powerfully works within me.

Paul claims to carry out his God given ministry with the energy that God works in him in power.

Peter, speaking of the grace-gifts received by God’s free grace, says:

1 Peter 4:11 …whoever serves, as one who serves by the strength that God supplies—in order that in everything God may be glorified through Jesus Christ. To him belong glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.

All service, whether ministering to physical, financial, or spiritual needs, is to be done in the strength that God supplies so that God gets the glory. Workings or activities focuses on the divine source of the abilities.

The distributions of the Spirit are gifts of free grace, they are services to the saints, they are the workings of God’s power. Each spiritual gift is an undeserved grace-gift, a service to others, and a powerful working of God’s power.

Spirit, Lord, God

1 Corinthians 12:4 Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5 and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; 6 and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone.

Notice that all the gifts find their origin in the triune God. It is the same Spirit, the same Lord, the same God who works all in all. The Holy Spirit, the Son and the Father together freely give gifts to the saints.

In verse 11 we see that it is the “Spirit who apportions to each one individually as he wills.” But in verse 18 we see that “God arranged the members in the body, each one of them as he chose.” In verse 24, we see that “God has so composed the body”. In verse 28, ‘God has appointed in the church” the various gifts. We see here both the distinct personality and the full deity of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit is not an ‘it’, a force, a thing. The Spirit is a ‘he’. He performs actions. He wills, he distributes, he gives, he empowers. He is a personal being who chooses and acts, who plans and carries out his purposes. And the Spirit is put on the same level with the Father and the Son. What the Spirit does, God does. In verse 6 it is the Father who empowers all in all, but in verse 11, all the gifts are empowered by one and the same Spirit. God empowers and the Spirit empowers and that empowering is one. The Spirit wills and God wills and that willing is one.

We see this in the giving of the grace-gifts. We also see the work of the triune God in salvation; only by the Holy Spirit can one acknowledge Jesus as Lord, …to the glory of God the Father. In John 6, we see that the work of God is that you believe in him whom he has sent. Jesus said:

John 6:33 For the bread of God is he who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”

Jesus came from the Father to give his life for the world.

John 6:37 All that the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out.

The Father gives people to his Son.

John 6:44 No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him. And I will raise him up on the last day.

Only those that the Father draws will come to the Son.

John 6:63 It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh is no help at all. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life.

The Father gives people to the Son and draws them to him, the Son will raise them up on the last day, but it is the Spirit who gives life. The Father, the Son and the Spirit together give life to dead sinners.

Ephesians 2:18 For through him [Jesus] we both have access in one Spirit to the Father.

Salvation is through Jesus, in the Spirit, to the Father.

2 Thessalonians 2:13 But we ought always to give thanks to God for you, brothers beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the firstfruits to be saved, through sanctification by the Spirit and belief in the truth. 14 To this he called you through our gospel, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.

We are loved by the Lord, chosen by God, sanctified by the Spirit. The Father, Son and Spirit together secure our salvation.

In John 14, Jesus spoke of the Spirit who:

John 6:17 …the Spirit of truth, … he dwells with you and will be in you.

The Spirit will dwell in believers. Then in verse 18 Jesus says:

John 6:18 “I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. …20 In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you.

Jesus says ‘I will come to you, I will be in you. Then in verse 23 he says:

…23 Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him.

We will come to him and make our home with him. The Father, Son and Spirit residing in the believer. In 1 Corinthians 3:16 we are told that we are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in us. 1 Corinthians 6:19 tells us “your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God”

The work of salvation is the work of the triune God. The believer is then possessed by the triune God, and the believer is gifted, empowered and placed into service by the triune God.

Thesis

Paul gives his thesis statement in verse 7, a statement that he will explain, defend and unpack in the rest of chapters 12-14:

1 Corinthians 12:7 To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.

To each. Every believer is spiritual. Every follower of Jesus has been gifted, empowered and employed in service to God.

Is given. The gifts of the Spirit are gifts. They are undeserved. Freely given by a gracious God.

The manifestation of the Spirit. The gifts demonstrate the presence and activity of the Holy Spirit. They show off the Spirit, they make known the Spirit.

For the common good. This is the purpose. Literally, ‘toward the coming together.’ The gifts, and those who are spiritual are for others. We are to serve others. Gifts are not given for personal advancement. Gifts are given to bless others, to benefit all, for the profit of all. Grace-gifts, ministries, empowerings, all the manifestations of the Spirit are for the common good.

Conclusion:

To answer the question ‘who is spiritual?’ It is the one who has been gifted by, deployed into ministry by, and empowered by the Spirit, the Son and the Father. This is the one who is spiritual. The one who has been regenerated by the Holy Spirit, the one who confesses Jesus as Lord, the one who believes in God, this one is spiritual. Marvel at the generosity of our God, who raises the dead and gives us life. Wonder at the Spirit who pours out the riches of his unearned grace on us. Be amazed at our Lord, who makes us useful to him. Stand in awe of the God who empowers us to please him.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

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August 31, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 12:1-3; Belief and the Spirit

08/24 1 Corinthians 12:1-3 Belief and the Spirit Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140824_1cor12_1-3.mp3

1 Corinthians 12 [SBLGNT]

1 Περὶ δὲ τῶν πνευματικῶν, ἀδελφοί, οὐ θέλω ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν. 2 οἴδατε ὅτι ὅτε ἔθνη ἦτε πρὸς τὰ εἴδωλα τὰ ἄφωνα ὡς ἂν ἤγεσθε ἀπαγόμενοι. 3 διὸ γνωρίζω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐδεὶς ἐν πνεύματι θεοῦ λαλῶν λέγει· Ἀνάθεμα Ἰησοῦς, καὶ οὐδεὶς δύναται εἰπεῖν· Κύριος Ἰησοῦς εἰ μὴ ἐν πνεύματι ἁγίῳ.

1 Corinthians 12 [ESV2011]

1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

Now Concerning

In chapter 12, Paul signals with the words ‘now concerning’, that he is moving on to address another topic that the Corinthians had asked him about in a letter. Back in chapter 7, he said:

7:1 Now concerning the matters about which you wrote:

There he addressed abstinence, celibacy, and marriage; in 7:25 he said ‘now concerning virgins’; in 8:1 ‘now concerning things offered to idols’; here in 12:1 ‘now concerning the spirituals’; in16:1 ‘now concerning the collection for the saints’; and in 16:12 ‘now concerning Apollos’. These are issues about which the church had written asking specific questions, to which the Apostle responds. Paul moves back and forth in this letter between issues that they had raised by the Corinthians in their letter to him, and reports which had come to him from others. We do not know exactly what the questions were, but we have the benefit of Apostolic teaching on the issues.

The Spiritual Ones

To understand what the question was, we have to look at what Paul wrote to answer their question. He introduces this section with a somewhat ambiguous phrase ‘now concerning the spirituals’ [τῶν πνευματικῶν]. This adjective built on the noun [πνεῦμα] ‘spirit’ could mean ‘the spiritual things’ or it could mean ‘the spiritual people’. And in the context it is used both ways. In verse 4 he mentions [χαρισμάτων], the usual word for spiritual gifts, literally ‘grace-gifts’, built on the word [χάρις] ‘grace’. In verse 3 he refers twice to what is spoken ‘in the Spirit’. In verse 7 he talks about the various manifestations of the Spirit that are given. In 14:1, he exhorts them to be zealous for the [πνευματικά], especially to prophesy. So ‘the spiritual things’ or manifestations of the Holy Spirit, grace-gifts, fits the context. But in 14:37, where he is concluding this section on [πνευματικῶν], he refers to anyone who thinks he is spiritual, clearly referring to a spiritual person. Back at the end of chapter 2 he contrasts the natural person with the spiritual person, and in 3:1, he laments that he cannot address the Corinthians as spiritual, but as fleshly, mere infants in Christ.

We know that pride and self-seeking were major issues in Corinth, a desire to impress others and be thought well of, to seek to advance one’s own status and standing in the community. There were divisions between rich and poor, wise and foolish, strong and weak, There was a severe vacuum of love, a lack of care and concern for the good of the other that repeatedly surfaces in Paul’s instructions to this church.

In these chapters, Paul addresses the diversity of the gifts given by the one Spirit, the mutual need of the different members for one another, the worthlessness of all the gifts without love, the essential purpose of the gifts to build up the church, and the priority of gifts that build up the church over gifts that build up the individual.

So we could re-create the Corinthian questions something like this: What is the measure of true spirituality? Some thought they were spiritual because they manifested more obviously supernatural gifts like speaking in tongues. They may have looked down on those who did not have such outwardly supernatural gifts as if they had not attained the same height of spirituality. Those without the showy gifts began to feel second rate and useless, unimportant appendages who did not have anything to offer, who simply didn’t belong. Those who didn’t possess these showy gifts may have even questioned the validity of those supposedly supernatural manifestations of the Spirit that were flaunted by some in their congregation. What about those so-called gifts? How are they to be used? Who are the truly spiritual ones?

Outline and Structure

Paul speaks to these issues with skill and pastoral wisdom. He addresses them as brothers, a term of affection, and he lays some theological groundwork before he confronts the abuses and improprieties in the way they treat one another. This is very similar to how he addressed the issue of idolatry back in chapters 8-10. He began in chapter 8 by clarifying the underlying theology that was foundational to the issue. Then in what seems at first glance to be a digression to another topic in chapter 9, he illustrates the principle of foregoing ones own rights out of service to others for their good. Then in chapter 10, he comes back to the issue with some very clear and direct commands that he expects them to understand and obey.

Here in chapters 12-14, Paul’s tactic is similar. In chapter 12, he lays some theological groundwork for the issue. In chapter 13, the love chapter, which many see as an out of place insertion in the middle of a discussion on spiritual gifts, he holds up the fruit of the Spirit as more essential to the Christian life than any particular manifestation of the gifts of the Spirit. Then in chapter 14, he comes back to the issue of spiritual gifts with some very direct commands on how we should conduct ourselves and treat one another relating to spiritual gifts in the church of God.

Let’s look at this introductory section together:

12:1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

Paul appeals to their desire for knowledge. He does not want them to be uninformed. He says ‘I want you to understand’. And he refers to their previous life of ignorance in idolatry. You recall, when you were pagans, before you heard the gospel and believed, you were led astray to unspeaking idols.

Idolatry

Idolatry was a significant part of life before Christ, and continued to be a struggle in first century Corinth, as is evidenced by chapters 8-10. Idolatry is centering one’s life around anything or anyone other than God. Sports or leisure or power or status or wealth or things or recreation or relationships, anything other than God that becomes the focal point of life is an idol. And idols cannot deliver on what they promise. Money cannot buy happiness. Things break. Experiences leave us longing for more. Relationships cannot bear up under the weight of expectations and ultimately disappoint.

The prophets of the Old Testament have much to say about the idiocy of idolatry.

Habakkuk 2:18 “What profit is an idol when its maker has shaped it, a metal image, a teacher of lies? For its maker trusts in his own creation when he makes speechless idols! 19 Woe to him who says to a wooden thing, Awake; to a silent stone, Arise!Can this teach? Behold, it is overlaid with gold and silver, and there is no breath at all in it 20 But the LORD is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence before him.”

The foolishness of idolatry is glaring. Our Creator God invites us to find our satisfaction in him alone, and we turn from him and go searching for pleasure under every rock and tree and hole in the ground. Romans describes the rebellious sinful idolatry of all humankind this way:

Romans 1:18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. 19 For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. 20 For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. 21 For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Claiming to be wise, they became fools, 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images resembling mortal man and birds and animals and creeping things.

We all tend toward idolatry in our hearts. Our desires lead us astray. We trade in the glory of knowing the immortal God for fleeting glimpses of his reflection in his creation.

Isaiah 53:6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; …

However we were led, we were all led astray.

Jesus is Lord

12:1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

Therefore, in relation to your question of what is spiritual, I do not want you to be uninformed; I want you to understand. No one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed”. Jesus spoke of the Spirit’s coming in John 15 and 16.

John 15:26 “But when the Helper comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me.

John 16:14 He will glorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you.

The Spirit of God will always bear witness about Jesus and bring glory to Jesus. No one who is spiritual would ever speak evil about Jesus. This would be unthinkable for any follower of Jesus to say.

3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

No one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit. Notice that the apostle uses the language of inability. No one is able, no one can.

When Peter made his confession of Jesus as the Christ, the Son of the living God, Jesus said:

Matthew 16:16 Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” 17 And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven.

Flesh and blood has not revealed this to you. The confession of the identity of Jesus as God is not of human origin. The recognition of Jesus for who he is is a supernatural revelation from the Father through his Holy Spirit.

This was clearly Paul’s own experience, as he was ‘still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord’ (Acts 9:1) when Jesus interrupted him on the road to Damascus.

Paul pointed this direction earlier in this letter when he:

1 Corinthians 2:2 For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. …4 and my speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 5 so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God.

He goes on to say that the rulers of this age did not understand the gospel,

1 Corinthians 2:8 … for if they had, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory. 9 But, as it is written, “What no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man imagined, what God has prepared for those who love him”— 10 these things God has revealed to us through the Spirit. For the Spirit searches everything, even the depths of God.

The good news of what God has prepared for those who love him, the gospel of the crucifixion of the Lord of glory for us and for our salvation, these things God has revealed to us through the Spirit.

1 Corinthians 2:11 For who knows a person’s thoughts except the spirit of that person, which is in him? So also no one comprehends the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God. 12 Now we have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, that we might understand the things freely given us by God.

We have received the Spirit of God so that we might understand the God’s gracious good news. Without God’s Spirit we could not understand the gospel. This is what he goes on to say in the next verses.

1 Corinthians 2:13 And we impart this in words not taught by human wisdom but taught by the Spirit, interpreting spiritual truths to those who are spiritual. 14 The natural person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned. 15 The spiritual person judges all things, but is himself to be judged by no one. 16 “For who has understood the mind of the Lord so as to instruct him?” But we have the mind of Christ.

The natural person, the person who has not experienced the work of the Holy Spirit supernaturally revealing that Jesus Christ crucified is good news for us, this person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God. He rejects the gospel because it is foolishness to him. He thinks it stupid. He is not able to understand the gospel, because the good news is spiritually discerned. The spiritual person who understands is only spiritual because the Holy Spirit is at work in him revealing Christ and the beauty of the gospel to him.

In 2 Corinthians 4, Paul points to the blindness of unbelievers.

2 Corinthians 4:3 And even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing. 4 In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.

They are blind and cannot see the light of the good news of the glory of Christ. Only a sovereign omnipotent God can overcome this spiritual blindness and create light in the midst of darkness.

2 Corinthians 4:6 For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

God is the one who gives the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. He shines in our hearts and opens our blind eyes so that we can see the truth and beauty of the gospel.

Paul says here in 1 Corinthians 12 that:

12:3 …no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

Of course this does not mean that no unbeliever can mouth those words. Mockers can mouth the words. Hypocrites can mouth the words. Pretenders can mouth the words ‘Jesus is Lord’. Jesus himself warned of this.

Matthew 7:21 “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. 22 On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ 23 And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.’

It is possible to call Jesus Lord out of a heart of unbelief in him, seeking to do things for him to earn his favor, refusing to depend on him alone for what he has done for us. Amazingly, in this passage, those who were not known by Jesus are not only calling Jesus Lord, but they are manifesting some of the same spiritual gifts that the Corinthians thought marked them out as spiritual. Even these apparently spiritual acts could be bad fruit from an unbelieving root.

It is not merely vocalizing the syllables, as if they were some kind of magical incantation, that has any effect. Romans 10:9 says:

Romans 10:9 because, if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.

This confession that Jesus is Lord is evidence of a Spirit wrought transformation of my hard heart. When I say ‘Jesus is Lord’, I am owning him as the one to whom I pledge my allegiance, the one to whom I owe all my devotion, the one to whom I will ultimately answer. He is the one under whose authority I now gladly bow. He is my Lord, he is my King, my only Master, and I would have it no other way. I have been given new affections, new desires, desires to obey and submit to Jesus, affections for Jesus, longings to please him, hunger to worship him, eagerness to gather with his people, to walk with him, to know him. I cannot genuinely celebrate the Lordship of Jesus without the transforming life creating work of the Spirit. Belief, the basic confession of Jesus as Lord, is evidence of the Holy Spirit’s regenerating work in my heart.

12:1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

Conclusion:

Do you see what Paul has done here? The Corinthians are asking about grace-gifts and wanting to know who are the truly spiritual ones. He has leveled the playing field. There are no more spiritual or less spiritual believers. Every believer is spiritual, because belief is the work of the Holy Spirit. No spiritually blind spiritually dead person can truly say ‘Jesus is Lord’. The Holy Spirit creates life in a dead heart and opens blind eyes so that a sinner can see the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ and believe in him. This saving faith, believing in Jesus as Lord, is evidence of Holy Spirit transformation, evidence of true spirituality.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

August 24, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 11:27-34; Judgment and Discipline

08/17 1 Corinthians 11:27-34 Judgment and Discipline ; Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140817_1cor11_27-34.mp3

1 Corinthians 11 [SBLGNT]

27 Ὥστε ὃς ἂν ἐσθίῃ τὸν ἄρτον ἢ πίνῃ τὸ ποτήριον τοῦ κυρίου ἀναξίως, ἔνοχος ἔσται τοῦ σώματος καὶ τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ κυρίου. 28 δοκιμαζέτω δὲ ἄνθρωπος ἑαυτόν, καὶ οὕτως ἐκ τοῦ ἄρτου ἐσθιέτω καὶ ἐκ τοῦ ποτηρίου πινέτω· 29 ὁ γὰρ ἐσθίων καὶ πίνων κρίμα ἑαυτῷ ἐσθίει καὶ πίνει μὴ διακρίνων τὸ σῶμα. 30 διὰ τοῦτο ἐν ὑμῖν πολλοὶ ἀσθενεῖς καὶ ἄρρωστοι καὶ κοιμῶνται ἱκανοί. 31 εἰ δὲ ἑαυτοὺς διεκρίνομεν, οὐκ ἂν ἐκρινόμεθα· 32 κρινόμενοι δὲ ὑπὸ κυρίου παιδευόμεθα, ἵνα μὴ σὺν τῷ κόσμῳ κατακριθῶμεν. 33 Ὥστε, ἀδελφοί μου, συνερχόμενοι εἰς τὸ φαγεῖν ἀλλήλους ἐκδέχεσθε. 34 εἴ τις πεινᾷ, ἐν οἴκῳ ἐσθιέτω, ἵνα μὴ εἰς κρίμα συνέρχησθε. Τὰ δὲ λοιπὰ ὡς ἂν ἔλθω διατάξομαι.

1 Corinthians 11 [ESV2011]

17 But in the following instructions I do not commend you, because when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse. 18 For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you. And I believe it in part, 19 for there must be factions among you in order that those who are genuine among you may be recognized. 20 When you come together, it is not the Lord’s supper that you eat. 21 For in eating, each one goes ahead with his own meal. One goes hungry, another gets drunk. 22 What! Do you not have houses to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I commend you in this? No, I will not. 23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes. 27 Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a person examine himself, then, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself. 30 That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. 31 But if we judged ourselves truly, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world. 33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for one another— 34 if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home—so that when you come together it will not be for judgment. About the other things I will give directions when I come.

Intro:

Paul is correcting problems in the church in Corinth. The Corinthians were self centered. They thought very highly of themselves. They were proud. One would put himself above another. Each was looking out for his own interests. Their actions and attitudes were out of step with the gospel. Things were so bad in Corinth that Paul tells them ‘when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse’, specifically in relation to their celebration of the Lord’s supper. Christ commanded his followers to remember him with bread and wine. But what the Corinthians were doing, one going hungry, another getting drunk, divisions, factions, despising the church of God and humiliating those who have nothing was worthy of judgment.

Paul lays out the problem in verses 17-22, he rehearses the history of the institution of the Lord’s supper by Jesus in verses 23-26, and then in verses 27-34 he gives his conclusion and corrective action for fixing the problem.

Jesus gave his life as a sacrifice for others. The Corinthians took what they wanted and neglected the needy among them.

Jesus humbled himself, surrendering his rights so that we could live. The Corinthians wanted recognition and honor, and they got it by humiliating others.

Jesus poured out his own blood as a new covenant agreement between us and God, securing our transformation by the Spirit. The Corinthians acted as if they were unchanged and failed to evidence the fruit of the Spirit.

Jesus loved the church and died to make her his own. The Corinthians despised and divided the church, even in the act of gathering together for worship.

Jesus is coming back for his church. That is intended to be a joyful celebration. The Corinthians instead are making it an occasion for judgment.

Communion is to be a proclamation of our Lord’s death. Our attitude, how we treat one another, is to preach the good news to those around us. We are to display the cross in our lifestyle, in everything, and especially in our celebration of communion.

Judgment

Paul warns then, that eating the bread or drinking the cup of the Lord unworthily brings guilt concerning the body and blood of the Lord. This passage is riddled with judgment language. Verse 28 encourages self-examination, then in verses 29-34 there are 7 occurrences of the word ‘judge’ or related words.

29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning [judging] the body eats and drinks judgment on himself. 30 That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. 31 But if we judged ourselves truly, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned [judged] along with the world. 33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for one another— 34 if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home—so that when you come together it will not be for judgment.

This is meant to sober us. The Lord is coming. Jesus said in John 5 that the Father…

John 5:27 And he has given him authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man.28 Do not marvel at this, for an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice 29 and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment.

Peter tells his readers:

1 Peter 4:17 For it is time for judgment to begin at the household of God; and if it begins with us, what will be the outcome for those who do not obey the gospel of God?

In 2 Thessalonians we get a glimpse of Jesus that we may not often think of:

2 Thessalonians 1:7 … when the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven with his mighty angels 8 in flaming fire, inflicting vengeance on those who do not know God and on those who do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus. 9 They will suffer the punishment of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might, 10 when he comes on that day to be glorified in his saints, and to be marveled at among all who have believed, because our testimony to you was believed.

This is serious. Jesus will inflict the fiery vengeance of eternal punishment on those who do not obey his gospel.

Is this meant to scare us? Yes. Yes it is. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. This is passage is a warning to us so that we will examine ourselves and avoid judgment.

Unworthy

27 Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a person examine himself, then, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup.

I do not want to be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. I do not want to incur judgment by despising the church of God. What does it mean to eat or drink in an unworthy manner? Aren’t we all unworthy? Romans tells us in absolute terms:

Romans 3:10 as it is written: “None is righteous, no, not one; 11 no one understands; no one seeks for God. 12 All have turned aside; together they have become worthless; no one does good, not even one.”

…20 For by works of the law no human being will be justified in his sight, since through the law comes knowledge of sin.

…23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,

We are all condemned under sin. Not one of us is worthy. Jesus tells us:

Matthew 5:48 You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.

and

Mark 10:18 …No one is good except God alone.

James tells us:

James 2:8 If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you are doing well. 9 But if you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors. 10 For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become accountable for all of it. 11 For he who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” If you do not commit adultery but do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law. 12 So speak and so act as those who are to be judged under the law of liberty. 13 For judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment.

‘Whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become accountable for all of it.’ Any sin is a sin against the one who gave the law. Just one sin makes me a transgressor of the law. So who is worthy? No one. No not one.

But this verse does not tell us that we must be worthy. We are not worthy and we cannot become worthy. This word is an adverb, not an adjective. An adjective modifies a noun, which would mean that the ‘whoever’ who eats and drinks would need to be worthy. But this is an adverb, which modifies the verbs in the sentence; eat and drink. It is translated ‘to eat or drink unworthily, or in an unworthy manner’. To be unworthy and to partake unworthily are very different things. Can we who are unworthy, partake of the Lord’s supper worthily?

That is the goal of Paul’s admonition. He wants us, sinners saved by grace, to examine ourselves and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup of the Lord in a worthy manner. So what does this mean? First, to participate worthily necessitates that I acknowledge my own unworthiness. To eat broken bread that symbolizes the Lord’s body given to me and to drink the cup which reminds me of his blood shed for me, all the while denying that I have done anything worthy of death is a gross contradiction. The whole reason Jesus came to die was me. My sins nailed him to the cross. To deny my own helplessness and desperate need for a Savior while receiving the symbols of his sacrificial death would be to eat and drink in a most unworthy manner.

Remember the story of the prodigal son? The son came to his senses and recognized his own unworthiness.

Luke 15:18 I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. 19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.”’

It was this son, who acknowledged his sin and his own unworthiness that the father ran with compassion and embraced and welcomed home. It was the older son who remained outside and refused to come in, who said:

Luke 15:29 but he answered his father, ‘Look, these many years I have served you, and I never disobeyed your command, …

Examine Yourself

Paul’s command is to examine ourselves. Come to your senses. Realize that you are only ever a sinner saved by the riches of God’s grace. Recognize that you are not being treated as you deserve. Acknowledge that it is the extravagant love of the Father who sent his only Son to be the sin bearing substitute for my sins that we celebrate. We are unworthy recipients of the lavish generosity of a merciful God. Examine yourself, see yourself as you really are, a rebel convicted of treason, sentenced to death, but extended pardon and adopted as a son of the very King against whom you revolted. ‘Examine yourself and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup.’ Do not examine yourself, conclude you are unworthy and decline. Examine yourself, agree with him that you are unworthy, and gladly receive his unmerited offer of grace!

Discerning the Body

27 Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a person examine himself, then, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself.

Here is more clarification on what it means to eat or drink in an unworthy manner. To partake unworthily is to eat or drink without discerning the body. The form of the word ‘judge’ here translated ‘discerning’ has a prefix that means to separate or make a distinction, to differentiate, to evaluate discerningly. Paul used this word back in chapter 4 this way:

1 Corinthians 4:6…that none of you may be puffed up in favor of one against another. 7 For who sees anything different in you? What do you have that you did not receive? If then you received it, why do you boast as if you did not receive it?

Who judges between one and another? None of you have a right to be puffed up, to consider yourself better than anyone else. Everything you have is a gift. You might be rich, you might be poor, but whatever you have is a gift from our good God. If your sins are forgiven, that is not something to boast about as if you are better than someone else; you have received unearned grace from our generous God. But in this verse what we are to differentiate or evaluate discerningly is ‘the body’ The body, in the immediate context is the body of Christ which is given for us. That body is absolutely unique. God the Son took human flesh so that he could stand in our place as the perfect substitute. He who knew no sin became sin for us (2Cor.5:21). As we come to Jesus and trust in him, believe on him, we become one body, as Paul said back in chapter 10:

1 Corinthians 10:16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.

When we participate in the body of Christ through faith, we together become his body, the church. In the next chapter, he will go on to deal more with the unity of the body:

1 Corinthians 12:12 For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. 13 For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body— Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

…25 that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another.

The Corinthians were dividing between rich and poor, those of status and those with none, those who were powerful and educated and those at the bottom of the social ladder. But the real division is between Jesus and us. He is Lord, we all are his servants. He is guiltless and we all are guilty. We owed an infinite debt, and he paid our debt in full. To fail to discern the body in this sense is to eat and drink judgment on ourselves. We miss the whole point of why Jesus came and what he accomplished, the very thing we are to be remembering as we celebrate the Lord’s supper.

29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself. 30 That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. 31 But if we judged ourselves truly, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world.

Discipline

This is a serious issue. There were tangible consequences in the church in Corinth. Many were weak and sick, and some even died. This was serious, and Jesus intended to get their attention. If we judge or evaluate ourselves discerningly, we would not be judged by the Lord. When we are judged by the Lord, it is not final condemnation. We are being trained as his children. Hebrews tells us:

Hebrews 12:6 For the Lord disciplines the one he loves, and chastises every son whom he receives.” 7 It is for discipline that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons. For what son is there whom his father does not discipline? 8 If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons.

The purpose of this parental training is to prevent our final condemnation. “we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world.” this form of ‘judge’ has a prefix that means to judge against or to sentence, to condemn.

Romans 8:1 There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.

The prospect of sickness, weakness, even death because of our sin may seem scary, (and the bible is clear that not all sickness, weakness or death is a result of sin; see the book of Job), but if it is because of our sin, we can thank God for loving us enough to not leave us in our sin and ultimately condemn us. If we are truly his children, if we are in Christ, adopted into his family, he will be faithful to discipline and train us in the way that we should go.

In John 5, where Jesus talks about the Father giving him the authority to judge, he says:

John 5:21 For as the Father raises the dead and gives them life, so also the Son gives life to whom he will. …24 Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life. He does not come into judgment, but has passed from death to life.

‘Whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life. He does not come into judgment but has passed from death into life.’ There is no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. The Son gives life. Those who hear and believe have eternal life. They have passed from death to life. They will never come into judgment. It is after this that he says:

John 5:28 …an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice 29 and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment.

So those who have done good are those who have believed, because they have already been given life. They have done good in response to the transformation of the Holy Spirit. That is what the New Covenant in his blood is all about. Those who have done evil are those who have not believed in Jesus.

John 3:18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

They are condemned because they have not believed. Their works are evil because, no matter how good they seem, they do not honor God, they do not receive his gift or give him thanks.

Final Instructions

Paul gives his final instructions on this issue.

33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for one another— 34 if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home—so that when you come together it will not be for judgment. About the other things I will give directions when I come.

When you come together. This is Paul’s corrective for his opening statement:

1 Corinthians 11:17 …when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse. 18 For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you…

Now he says when you come together as a church, in your regular celebration of the Lord’s supper, wait for one another. Wait for one another in the sense of receiving one another, welcoming one another, eliminating the divisions where one feels he is better than another, where one goes hungry and another gets drunk. Receive one another as God in Christ has received you. The gathering of the believers is to celebrate the cross in word and in deed. We must sacrifice our own rights, our own desires, for the good of the other, just as Christ laid down his rights and died for sinners to make us his. If you are hungry, if you are showing up simply to satiate your appetite with a complete disregard for Christ and for those for whom he died, then stay home. Eat at home. Be a glutton at home. But don’t despise the church of God and eat and drink judgment on yourself.

1 Corinthians 11:23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

August 17, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1 Corinthians 11:23-26; Proclaiming the Lord’s Death

08/10 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 Proclaiming the Lord’s Death Audio available at: http://www.ephraimbible.org/Sermons/20140810_1cor11_23-26.mp3

1 Corinthians 11 [SBLGNT]

23 Ἐγὼ γὰρ παρέλαβον ἀπὸ τοῦ κυρίου, ὃ καὶ παρέδωκα ὑμῖν, ὅτι ὁ κύριος Ἰησοῦς ἐν τῇ νυκτὶ ᾗ παρεδίδετο ἔλαβεν ἄρτον 24 καὶ εὐχαριστήσας ἔκλασεν καὶ εἶπεν· Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν· τοῦτο ποιεῖτε εἰς τὴν ἐμὴν ἀνάμνησιν. 25 ὡσαύτως καὶ τὸ ποτήριον μετὰ τὸ δειπνῆσαι, λέγων· Τοῦτο τὸ ποτήριον ἡ καινὴ διαθήκη ἐστὶν ἐν τῷ ἐμῷ αἵματι· τοῦτο ποιεῖτε, ὁσάκις ἐὰν πίνητε, εἰς τὴν ἐμὴν ἀνάμνησιν. 26 ὁσάκις γὰρ ἐὰν ἐσθίητε τὸν ἄρτον τοῦτον καὶ τὸ ποτήριον πίνητε, τὸν θάνατον τοῦ κυρίου καταγγέλλετε, ἄχρι οὗ ἔλθῃ.

1 Corinthians 11 [ESV2011]

17 But in the following instructions I do not commend you, because when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse. 18 For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you. And I believe it in part, 19 for there must be factions among you in order that those who are genuine among you may be recognized. 20 When you come together, it is not the Lord’s supper that you eat. 21 For in eating, each one goes ahead with his own meal. One goes hungry, another gets drunk. 22 What! Do you not have houses to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I commend you in this? No, I will not. 23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes. 27 Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a person examine himself, then, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself. 30 That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. 31 But if we judged ourselves truly, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world. 33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for one another— 34 if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home—so that when you come together it will not be for judgment. About the other things I will give directions when I come.

Paul is confronting the Corinthians abuse of the Lord’s supper. Communion was celebrated regularly in the church. The communal meal had become an occasion for discrimination against the poor, where the rich flaunted their luxury and let those who had nothing go hungry. In the first section (17-22), Paul expressed his horror and consternation over their outrageous practices. What they were doing was not in step with the gospel, the message of the cross. So once again he brings them back to the sacrifice of Jesus for others. For the Lord’s supper to truly be the Lord’s supper, it must be an expression of the gospel, not only in word and symbol, but also in the way they treat one another. The gospel is not only a message to be believed, but also a lifestyle to be lived. The good news of a crucified Messiah must define the Christian life.

In this section, (23-26) Paul takes them back to the event, to the history of the Lord’s supper to inform and correct their actions. It is a faulty theology, a flawed understanding of Jesus, who he is, what he came to do, that manifested itself in the abuses that were happening in the church. Then, in verses 27-34 he gives his corrective instructions.

If we keep our eyes on Jesus, it is easy to follow him. It is when we look away that we veer off course.

The Lord

23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you,

Paul received from the Lord. LORD in the Old Testament is the translation of YHWH, the great I AM, God’s proper name. The New Testament writers refer to Jesus as the Lord. The word ‘Lord’ means the sovereign, the king, the one in authority. In the next phrase he refers to the Lord Jesus. Jesus is the Master. Jesus is the King. He is the one who has all authority. He is the one we are to follow. He is the one we must obey. He is the one who dictates what takes place in his church and the celebration which he instituted for us to remember him by. The Corinthians need to be reminded who is in charge of the church. The people with influence thought they could run the church however they wanted. They needed to be reminded that Jesus is Lord. He is in charge, he alone is the Lord of his church. Paul, the Apostle, is still under orders. Paul is authorized to pass on only what he has received from the Lord Jesus.

Delivered

What Paul received from the Lord, he delivered to the churches. He faithfully handed over that which he had been entrusted with. He had been given the truth of an historical event. This is what he passed along to the churches.

This word ‘delivered’ is the same word translated ‘betrayed’ later in this verse. ‘The Lord Jesus, on the night he was delivered up…’. This is the word used in the gospels to describe what Judas did. But it is also the word used when the chief priests and elders delivered Jesus over to Pilate (Mt.27:2, 18), and of Pilate delivering Jesus to the soldiers to be crucified (Mt.27:26).

But this is not the only way this word is used.

Romans 4:24 …It will be counted to us who believe in him who raised from the dead Jesus our Lord, 25 who was delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification.

In Romans 8, we are told that it was the Father who delivered Jesus up to be crucified for us.

Romans 8:32 He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?

This fits with what we are told in Isaiah 53.

Isaiah 53:4 Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.

The Greek translation of the Old Testament uses this word ‘delivered up’ to translate the last phrase of verse 6. It reads ‘and the Lord delivered him up for our sins’. Down in verse 10 we read:

Isaiah 53:10 Yet it was the will of the LORD to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. 11 Out of the anguish of his soul he shall see and be satisfied; by his knowledge shall the righteous one, my servant, make many to be accounted righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities.

Judas delivered up Jesus to be crucified, but God the Father delivered up his only Son to bear our sins on the cross. We see this in the preaching of the Apostles in the book of Acts

Acts 2:23 this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men.

And in the prayers of the early church.

Acts 4:27 for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, 28 to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place.

We see yet another side of this in some of the New Testament letters.

Galatians 2:20 I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

The same word appears here. Jesus delivered himself up for me.

Ephesians 5:2 And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.

25 Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her,

Judas delivered Jesus up, the chief priests delivered him up, Pilate delivered him up, but ultimately God the Father delivered up his only Son, and Jesus willingly delivered himself up for our sins.

This night of all nights, when Jesus was delivered up, the Lamb of God who takes away our sins, the fulfillment of the passover sacrifice, in the last passover celebration with his followers,

23 …the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.”

Gave Thanks

Jesus thanked his Father for his good gift of provision. Every good gift comes from God, and Jesus was determined to recognize the giver. Jesus, on the night he was being delivered up to be crucified, gave thanks to God. God is the one who provides for all our needs, and God is the one who provided the ultimate sacrifice for us to take away our sin. And Jesus, who would soon cry out ‘my God my God, why have you forsaken me’ thanked his Father for this provision.

Bread Broken

Jesus took bread and broke it. Bread was a common part of every meal. Bread was broken so that it could be shared. This flew in the face of the Corinthian selfishness of the ones who had plenty gorging themselves while those who had nothing went hungry. The Corinthians were taking, taking the best for themselves and leaving some to go with nothing. Jesus was taking, taking bread with thanksgiving, breaking it so he could give it all away, knowing there was plenty for all. Jesus said ‘this is my body which is for you’. The commemoration of this selfless act of sacrificial giving had become an opportunity for self centered gluttony and greed.

Jesus offered his own body for others. This was the ultimate selfless act, forfeiting his own life to save the lives of countless others. His own physical body was to be broken, crushed under weight of all our sins. Jesus’ death was in essence a substitution. He gave his body for us. He put himself in our place. We deserve to be separated from a good God for eternity, but instead he, the eternal Son was separated from his Father. His death was for me, his body was broken for me.

In Remembrance

23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”

Jesus commands us to break bread together as a church in remembrance of him. What does it mean to remember someone? In a memorial service, we call that person to mind, reflect on who they were, what they accomplished. Is this what Jesus meant when he told us to ‘do this in remembrance of me’? Certainly that is part of it, but is that the whole story? If we look back to the Old Testament, we get a clearer picture of what it means to remember.

In Genesis 8:1, we are told that ‘God remembered Noah’. Does this mean that God was preoccupied with other things while the ark was bobbing around on the surface of the water and it suddenly dawned on him that Noah and the animals were in there and might need some help?

Exodus 2:24 And God heard their groaning, and God remembered his covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob.

Are we expected to believe that God had forgotten about his promises for about 400 years until the people started groaning? When we are told that God remembered Noah, it meant that he was beginning to act for the sake of the one he remembered. When God remembered his covenant promises with the patriarchs in the exodus generation, it meant that he was about to leap into action appropriate to the promises he had made. Remembering involved acting in a certain way. To remember Jesus, who sacrificially gave his life for others, means not only to reflect on him, his character, and his sacrifice, but also to act in a way that corresponds with his sacrifice.

When Moses addressed the generation about to enter the promised land, the generation that had been born free in the wilderness, he said:

Deuteronomy 5:15 You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the LORD your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm.

That generation had never been slaves in Egypt. But as Moses instructs them how to treat slaves, he asks them to remember that they were slaves in Egypt. Looking toward future generations, Moses gave instructions

Exodus 13:8 You shall tell your son on that day, ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt.’

These future generations celebrating passover had never been slaves in Egypt. But they were part of God’s people, and what God had done for their ancestors, he had done for them. They were to so identify with the exodus generation that they could say ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me.’ In a much more direct way, we can say ‘it is because of what the Lord Jesus did for me when he set me free from my slavery to sin’.

New Covenant

25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

Just as Jesus had taken bread, gave thanks, and served it to his disciples, saying ‘this is my body which is for you’, now he takes the cup of wine and says ‘this cup is the new covenant in my blood’. To understand what Jesus says, we need to understand what a covenant is, and what makes this covenant new. A covenant is a binding committed relationship. Covenants were entered into through a solemn ceremony involving the shedding of blood. Animals were cut in half, and the two parties making the covenant would walk between the animal halves, saying ‘if I do not keep my promises, let what was done to these animals be done to me.’ God made a covenant with his people when they came out of Egypt. The people promised ‘all that the Lord has spoken we will do, and we will be obedient’ (Ex.24:7). God warned Moses that the people will ‘whore after foreign gods, and they will forsake me and break my covenant that I have made with them; they will turn to other gods and serve them, and despise me and break my covenant’ (Deut.31:16, 20). Israel went astray in their hearts. They broke God’s covenant with them. But in Jeremiah 31, God promised to make a new covenant with them.

Jeremiah 31:31 “Behold, the days are coming, declares the LORD, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, 32 not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the LORD. 33 For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the LORD: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people. 34 And no longer shall each one teach his neighbor and each his brother, saying, ‘Know the LORD,’ for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the LORD. For I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”

Forgiveness of sins, and God’s law written on their hearts. Ezekiel puts it this way:

Ezekiel 36:25 I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you shall be clean from all your uncleannesses, and from all your idols I will cleanse you. 26 And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. And I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. 27 And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules.

A new heart and a new spirit, God’s Spirit inside, causing them to walk in his ways. No longer external regulations, but now internal transformation. And Jesus says that this new covenant, is the new covenant in his blood. Jesus instituted the covenant, not with the blood of animals, but with his own blood poured out in death. Now that the Holy Spirit is living inside, we have God’s power to love him above all else and serve him with our whole heart. Our desires are being transformed so that we want to do what pleases him. The Corinthians in their selfishness, were acting exactly contrary to the new life of the Spirit, which is a life of self-sacrificial love for others.

Proclaiming the Lord’s Death

25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

In eating the bread and drinking the cup we preach the message of the cross. The word ‘proclamation’ is most often used of the preaching of the gospel. From the beginning of this letter, Paul pointed us to the preaching of the cross, the good news of Christ crucified. Now he says that in a right participation in communion, we preach the gospel. How is it that our celebration of the Lord’s supper can be an act of proclamation? Paul was very clear in his rebuke, that when one goes hungry and another gets drunk, that is not the Lord’s supper. But when we remember Jesus by contemplating his life of self sacrifice and conduct ourselves with the good of others above our own, when we joyfully forgo our own rights so that others can know Christ, when we are willing to lay down our very lives so that others can hear the gospel and be saved, when we remember him by acting in the way that he would act, then we have become a living proclamation of the death of our Lord. We have become a living illustration of the cross, where love expresses itself in self-sacrifice for the good of others.

Until He Comes

26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

This is not indefinite. There is a termination point for this way of remembering Jesus. Jesus is returning. Physically, bodily he will come back. Jesus told many parables about a king who went away for a time and then returned. He was very clear as to how the servants of the king are expected to conduct themselves in the absence of the king. The Master will return. He will find either evidence of self centered pride, or of a life devoted to the Master, transformed by his Spirit, displaying his character.

23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

Pastor Rodney Zedicher ~ Ephraim Church of the Bible ~ www.ephraimbible.org

August 10, 2014 Posted by | 1 Corinthians, podcast | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment